3. Two Worlds Meet




(This is the Learning Episode 3 for Julie Cajune’s teaching unit, “Sxwiwis – The Journey.)

*We respectfully request that any teacher who downloads any materials being provided by Julie Cajune for this Teaching, please only use such items in the classroom.  None of these materials is intended for publication in any form without permission; everything is copyrighted.

 

LESSON 8

TRADITIONS OF HOSPITALITY

CCSS.ELA

Literacy.SL.11-12.1

Materials

Entry Question

  • How do we define home?
  • What are our traditions of hospitality?

Learning Objectives

  • Responding to and posing questions during discussion
  • Listening for understanding
  • Analytical viewing and discussion of cultural information embedded in film
  • Write the word “home” on the board. What is it? Where is it? Ask students to give definitions of the word. Then ask them to respond to the sayings:
    • There’s no place like home.
    • Home is where the heart is.
    • Charity begins at home, but should not end there.
    • Where thou art, that is home.
  • What happens when someone comes to our home? Someone we know? Someone we don’t know? Someone invited? Someone uninvited? What are the traditions of hospitality at your home? What are the traditions of hospitality at our school? What are the traditions of hospitality of our state and national leaders and agencies?
  • Discuss the Salish perspective that home is the land. Ask students to give specific examples that portray this concept.
  • Ask students to discuss in their group what they think the Salish would do when someone came into their homeland – someone they knew, someone they didn’t, someone invited, someone uninvited.
  • Students now discuss in their group what they think the Salish did (and why) when the Lewis and Clark Expedition entered Salish homelands.
  • Set up film clips (that you have already viewed). Show dougL&C.mov first. It is the introduction that sets up the story. Then show the first seven minutes and 42 seconds of the film clip meetL&C.mov Ask students the following questions; you can also use these questions for guided viewing of the film clip: How did the Salish protect their homelands? How did they determine and extend hospitality? Have students keep this question in mind as they view the rest of the film clip: What were the Salish rituals and traditions of hospitality? Show the remaining twenty-two minutes of the film.

Assessment

Students write a one-page essay on what traditions of hospitality communicate about us. Students plan and host an event with invited guests and design and enact hospitality protocols.

 

LESSON 9

CULTURAL PERCEPTIONS

CCSS.ELA

  • Literacy.RI.11-12.1
  • Literacy.SL.11-12.6

Materials

Student copies of Lewis and Clark Expedition journal entries about the Salish

Entry Questions

  • How do you think the Expedition viewed American Indian people?
  • What informed their opinions and perspectives?

Learning Objectives

  • Making inferences from prior knowledge
  • Analyzing text for viewpoints and purpose
  • Exploring text through dramatic interpretation
  • Pose the entry questions for students to discuss in their groups. Ask groups to share at least one response with the whole class.
  • Give students copies of the journal entries and direct them to highlight descriptive words used to characterize or describe the Salish people.
  • After they have finished reading all of the journal entries, ask students to write a summary paragraph on the expedition’s perspective of the Salish.
  • Assign each group a different journal entry. As a group they are to develop and deliver a dramatic reading of the journal entry. They can do the reading chorally as a whole group, or members can take specific parts to say individually. Discuss various tones they might utilize to add meaning or nuance such as formal, arrogant, paternalistic, condescending, angry, bored, etc. Poetic license can be employed by repeating phrases or words. Give 15 minutes for groups to rehearse their presentations.
  • Groups take turns delivering their dramatic readings.
  • Students identify the various tones utilized and how they affected the meaning of the text.

Assessment

Utilize student summaries of the journal entries from step 3 along with their dramatic readings.

 

 

LESSON 10

CULTURAL PERCEPTIONS

CCSS.ELA

  • Literacy.RI.11-12.1
  • Literacy.SL.11-12.6

Materials

Entry Questions

  • How do you think the Salish viewed the expedition?
  • What factors informed their perspective?

Learning Objectives

  • Making inferences from prior knowledge
  • Analyzing text for viewpoints and purpose
  • Exploring text through dramatic interpretation
  • Pose the entry questions for students to discuss in their groups. As a whole class, discuss ideas on how the Salish would judge, view, and determine the intentions of the expedition.
  • Provide students copies of the oral histories and give them time to read and discuss in their group. What did the Salish think of the expedition members? What did they base their opinions on?
  • Select an oral history for each group to design and deliver a dramatic interpretation. As with the journal entries, ask groups to utilize tone to emphasize or add meaning and complexity to the text. Give 15 minutes for design and rehearsal. Again, this can be done chorally, or individual group members can recite specific passages. Poetic license can be employed to repeat phrases or words.
  • Groups take turns providing their dramatic interpretations.
  • Select several audio files from the website and play for students.
  • Read through the Socratic Circle instructions and arrange the class in an inside and outside circle. Explain the process and purpose of a Socratic Circle. Choose from the following questions or design your own: Did the Salish know the intention of the expedition? What might have happened to the expedition if the Salish had not provided supplies and horse? Did members of the expedition have any cultural bias toward American Indians? Did members of the Salish band have any cultural bias toward the expedition?

Assessment

Utilize student oral responses during the Socratic Seminar as a formative evaluation.