Secondary


We currently offer six Curricular Units that have been designed for secondary classrooms:

cajune“Sxwiwis – The Journey” has been authored by curriculum designer Julie Cajune (Salish). She writes: “A singular historic event can have significantly different outcomes for individuals or groups that are culturally, socially, or economically divers or dissimilar.”

PDF to download: Sxwiwis—The Journey


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  • “Living within the Four Base Tipi Poles” has been authored by curriculum designers Shane Doyle (Apsáalooke/Crow) and Megkian Doyle. They write: “Despite suffering tremendous loss of life, land, and economy, the cultural values and ideals of the Apsáalooke people have allowed them to continue to grow as a nation and persevere into the 21st century.”

PDF to download: Apsáalooke Basawua Iichia Shoope Aalahputtua Koowiikooluk / Living within the Four Base Tipi Poles of the Apsáalooke Homeland

  • “Tribal Oral Traditions and Languages in the Plains Region of the Lewis and Clark Trail” has been authored by curriculum designer Shane Doyle 

PDF to download: Tribal Oral Traditions and Languages in the Plains Region of the Lewis and Clark Trail  

  • “Traditional Native Games Along the Lewis and Clark Trail” has been authored by curriculum designer Shane Doyle.  

PDF to download: Traditional Native Games Along the Lewis and Clark Trail


Critical Thinking about Maps and Mapmaking” has been authored by curriculum designer Aisling Roche.

Aisling works at a public high school in Brooklyn, NY, teaching special education in the English Department at the Academy of Urban Planning. She has ten years of teaching experience, offering courses in English Language Acquisition, Model UN, Film Studies, Introduction to Visual Arts, Earth Science, Living Environment, and Algebra! She is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of Chicago and holds a Masters from Long Island University.

PDF to download: Critical Thinking about Maps and Mapmaking


There There by Tommy Orange, the Importance of Place, and Contemporary Native American Communities has been authored by curriculum designer Miriam Rock.

Miriam Rock currently lives in Philadelphia and is teaching high school English at Friends Select, a local Quaker school. She did her undergrad at Yale and her masters at Penn. She spent three years living in Maryland and working at Sandy Spring Friends School. During her time at Sandy Spring, Miriam had the good fortune to lead a week-long service trip to New Mexico and spend time getting to know a Navajo weaver and Zuni Mission muralist. In addition to two sophomore classes, she is teaching a junior American Literature course and a senior elective, titled “Race, Gender and Nationality in Literature.”

PDF to download: There There by Tommy Orange, the Importance of Place, and Contemporary Native American Communities