Category Archives: Faculty

Online Report Card: Tracking Online Education in the United States

The 13th and final comprehensive annual report on online education, put out by the OLC, the Babson Survey Research Group, and others. Full report available for download.

The decision to end the reports in their current form is also based on the maturation of distance education programs in higher education and the growing number of other reports and surveys that have launched since we began this particular effort back in 2003. When more than one-quarter of higher education students are taking a course online, distance education is clearly mainstream.

Allen, I. Elaine, and Jeff Seaman, with Russell Poulin and Terri Taylor Straut. Online Report Card: Tracking Online Education in the United States. February 2016.

 

Links: Stanford Launches New Innovative Teaching and Course Design Grant Program

Stanford’s new grant program seeks to provide internal financial support for innovative uses of technology in learning, including course design or re-design.

The goal of the new grant program is to support future-facing, faculty-driven innovation.

Read more at Campus Technology (January 27, 2016), or read the official announcement.

Link: Online Teaching, it Turns Out, Isn’t Impersonal

Excellent reflections by UCONN professor Gregory Semenza, who taught an online course for the first time this year, over on the Chronicle’s Vitae site.

Now that I’ve completed this first course, I feel strongly that Edmundson and other critics — however well-intended — are simply misguided about online learning being too impersonal. I got to know my group of 30 online students as well as, or better, than any undergraduate course I’ve taught in recent years.

Read the full article here.

File: Educational Technology and Faculty Development in Higher Education

This report looks across EDUCAUSE Core Data Service (CDS) and ECAR resources to tell the story about how faculty use technology, how students experience technology, and how institutional practices support educational technology. Together, the findings from these sources provide a three-dimensional perspective for how technologies in the teaching and learning environment are used by faculty, consumed by students, and supported by institutions.

Dahlstrom, Eden (2015). Educational Technology and Faculty Development in Higher Education. EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research, EDUCAUSE.

File: Against the Natural Order of Things: Why E-Learning Refuses to Take Off

A well-written and comprehensive overview of the pitfalls of advocating for technological change without due consideration of faculty expertise. Highly recommended.

This helps to explain why many predictions of the future fail: not because the technology itself will not materialize, but because the people doing the predictions are not experts in the situations or domains they are aiming to affect. They develop tools without watching the way people work. This is why their visions strike us as funny, odd, or even offensive. And it’s why, when a technologist tries to tell a designer, a doctor, or a teacher “you will work like this in the future,” they laugh.

Baldwin, Jonathan. “‘Against the Natural Order of Things’: Why E-Learning Refuses to Take Off.” In Centennial Conversations: Essential Essays in Professional, Continuing, and Online Education. UPCEA, 2015.

Link/File: ECAR Study of Faculty and IT (2015)

The second annual Study of Faculty and Information Technology (2015) has been released by the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research. Customized results for UO are also available.

Interestingly, faculty in this study believe that IT may not have the funding or capacity to manage change as well as it could, suggesting potential for powerful, combined advocacy for appropriate technology investment. e greatest value of a study like this is not the conclusions it reaches but the campus conversations it begins.

Link: Redefining Service for the Digital Academic: Scholarship, Social Media, and Silos

A reflection on the ways in which technology mediates the traditional balance of research, teaching, and service for faculty.

Some days, I see my academic self as multiplatform, in a sense.  That self is fluid, moving with some ease among the silos of research, service, and teaching; that movement is facilitated by the networks I’ve created and the networks I share throughout the digital space.  Like the pathways in a brain, they crisscross, they intersect, there are multiple conduits for information and multiple opportunities for synthesis.

Utell, Janine. “Redefining Service for the Digital Academic: Scholarship, Social Media, and Silos.” Hybrid Pedagogy, November 2015.

Link: 7 Things You should Know About Video Communication

Educause (2013)

Live video communication is becoming a staple in educational venues, where instructors employ it for office hours, online courses, presentations by special lecturers, just-in-time learning, or coordination with researchers in the field. It can offer a convenient venue for faculty meetings, staff liaising, and project planning when not all parties are on-site.

Read the full article here.