Tag Archives: EAB

Link: Step One in Eliminating Course Bottlenecks

This blog post from the Education Advisory Board articulates the key factors (and their definitions!) that UW-Madison leaders used to determine which of their undergraduate courses were impeding timely graduation. These factors might serve as inspiration for UO or other comparable institutions.

Step One in Eliminating Course Bottlenecks: Find The Cause (EAB, January 2016)

LINK: Why One College Created a Full Analytics Office

In 2012, University of Maryland University College (UMUC) created an Office of Analytics, comprising a team of 14 people. The office focuses on marketing, enrollment management, retention, service centers, financials, and executive and academic program dashboards.  The office shares the four rules they follow and how UMUC benefits.

“We knew we had to take what we had left and invest in the priority: analytics.”

“Our approach is to demonstrate the ‘art of possible’ to the institution,” says Darren Catalano, VP of Analytics, “in other words, to make complex data simple.”

“Why one college created a full analytics office.” EAB Daily. November 4, 2015.

Link: Future Students, Future Revenues [EAB restricted content]

“This brief, based on conversations with over 150 higher education leaders across North America, analyzes the fundamental forces that will shape higher education over the next decade and highlights the strategies and competencies that colleges and universities will need to be successful.”

“Over the past decade, universities were able to grow revenue primarily by growing enrollment and increasing net tuition per student. But demographic and economic changes will make it increasingly difficult for all but a handful of institutions to grow tuition revenue at historic rates. Despite rising access rates, demographic projections suggest that the number of high school graduates will decline over the coming decade, leading to a dramatic drop-off in the overall rate of enrollment growth.”

Key Takeaways:

  •  Nontraditional students will drive enrollment and revenue growth, not traditional student population (18-22 year olds).
  • Need to invest in serving nontraditional students.
  • Online and hybrid education can assist, but strategy should be driven by student needs, not external forces.

“Future Students, Future Revenues — Thriving in a Decade of Demographic Decline.” EAB report. April 13, 2014.

Link: Understanding the Changing Market for Professional Master’s Programs

Education Advisory Board (EAB), “Understanding the Changing Market for Professional Master’s Programs.” July 2015.

In both core disciplines and new niche fields, the key to capturing emerging market growth is customizing offerings not just to “working professionals” but to distinct segments within this group— career starters, career advancers, career changers, and career crossers—through features such as flexible delivery, stackable credentials, practical experience, accelerated format, interdisciplinary pathways, and professional development.

With the market for master’s degrees growing and changing, this segment is estimated to outpace all other degrees. The program focus will be on specific job skills that help students gain a new job or advance in an existing position.

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