Category: Rare Books

New Acquisitions: Taller de Gráfica Popular

Special Collections and University Archives has recently acquired two works published by the Taller de Gráfica Popular, an artist’s print collective founded in 1937 in Mexico that produces art for political and revolutionary social causes, including anti-militarism, organized labor, and anti-fascism

Taller de Gráfica Popular (Spanish: “People’s Graphic Workshop”) was established by the artists Leopoldo Méndez, Pablo O’Higgins, and Luis Arenal after the dissolution of Liga de Escritores y Artistas Revolucionarios (LEAR, Revolutionary Writers’ and Artists’ League), a group of artists who supported the Mexican Revolution. TGP’s print shop specialized in linoleum and woodblock printing, often working collaboratively among members and international artists.

These works complement the collection objective of building on strengths in political activism and counter-culture. Much of the artwork also touches on cross-border and borderland issues between the United States and Mexico.

El Taller de Gráfica Popular: Doce años de obra artística colectiva (Mexico City, 1949)

A catalog of works produced by TGP between 1937-1949

The catalog “The Workshop for Popular Graphic Art: A Record of Twelve Years of Collective Work” was published in Mexico City in 1949 by La Estampa Mexicana, the TGP’s imprint for the sale of political posters, prints, song lyrics, and poetry. The catalog is bound in a spiral-bound album, and contains black and white illustrations with text in Spanish and English. The catalog also contains five original wood engravings signed in pencil by the artists Alfredo Zalce, Alberto Beltrán, G. Fernandez Ledesma, Francisco Mora and Carlos Merida.

Continue reading

New Exhibit | Tomorrow’s Scientists: Children’s Literature of the Cold War Era

University of Oregon Libraries and Eugene Public Library are pleased to announce a joint exhibition titled Tomorrow’s Scientists: Children’s Literature of the Cold War Era, now on display.

As we reflect on the 50th anniversary of the manned moon landing, this exhibition presents original manuscripts, artifacts, illustrations, and rare books which explore the intersection of politics, space, and technology in children’s literature published during the height of the Cold War.

The joint exhibits are on display at two locations:

Special Collections and University Archives
Knight Library, Paulson Reading Reading Room, Second Floor North
On display through March 2020 | check open hours here

Drawing upon Special Collections and University Archives’ extensive Children’s Literature Collections, this display presents original materials from twentieth century children’s book illustrators, authors, and publishers that highlight the complex intersections between American politics and children’s literature during the Cold War era.

This exhibit documents a range of political issues represented in juvenile popular culture during this period including: science education initiatives in America, responses to the launch of Sputnik I, developments in nuclear energy, the history of the US space program, and Communism ideologies and reactions.

Eugene Public Library
Downtown Library, Children’s Center, First Floor
On display through January 2020 | check open hours here

Little Golden Books, science texts for children, facsimile illustrations, and vintage toys on display at Eugene Public Library illustrate the impact of the space race on popular culture and boom of science publishing in the mid-twentieth century. In many of these works, authors and illustrators presented children of the 1950s–1960s with utopian visions of a future filled with space suits and flying cars on the eve of space exploration.

Continue reading

Isaac Newton’s Work on Calculus – De analysi (1711)

This is the first of a series of blog posts highlighting notable books from SCUA’s rare book collection brought to light during the preparation for an ongoing retrospective cataloging project, where card catalog records are converted to computerized records for materials held before computer cataloging began. The title described below was discovered in a sub-basement storage location being used as a temporary holding area. It is of interest to note that the item has a check-out sleeve pasted into the back cover indicating that it was at one time in the past part of the library’s circulating collection.

Special Collections and University Archives holds a copy of Isaac Newton’s Analysis per Quantitatum Series, Fluxiones, ac Differentias: cum Enumeratione Linearum Tertii Ordinis (London: Pearson, 1711), the first edition of the third of Newton’s major works on physics and mathematics, following Principia (1687) and Opticks (1704).

Continue reading

Kelmscottiana: Books Owned and Published by William Morris

Special Collections and University Archives has recently enlarged its holdings of materials related to British designer William Morris (1834-1896), including the purchase of two printed leaves from Kelmscott Press’s The works of Geoffrey Chaucer and the cataloguing of a sixteenth century book printed by Wynken de Worde that was previously part of Morris’s personal library at Kelmscott House.

Ex libris: From the library of William Morris

Bookplate
[Bookplate on interior cover, Andrew Chertsey, The floure of the commaundementes of god (London: Wynken de Worde, 1510), BV4655 .F55 1510, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.]
During recent conservation work, staff noted the presence of William Morris’s bookplate in a copy of Andrew Chertsey’s translated Floure of the commandments of God (ESTC S117724). The notable printer Wynken de Worde (d. 1534) printed this book at his London print shop on Fleet Street on September 13, 1510. The text was translated from the French La fleur des commandements de Dieu (1496), and it recounts stories of disobedient behavior and terrible punishments, with the aim to frighten readers into virtuous living. The bookseller’s description is tipped in on the inside cover which states that, “every story almost, partakes of the marvellous to a greater or less extent, and as persuasives they should prove successful, provided of course the receptive mind had a little of the 15th century credulity in such matters.”

Continue reading

New Acquisition: 1564 Spanish Antiphonary

Special Collections and University Archives has recently acquired a sixteenth-century Spanish antiphonary, a liturgical book containing the sung parts of the Divine Office. Chants include the antiphons sung with the psalms and canticles; the responsories of Matins and Vespers; and sometimes the hymns.

Page open to book of music.
[Readings for the Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, M2148 .L4 1564, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.]
The musical notation is in black nota quadrata on five line staves in red, with Latin text and rubrics. The book is printed on thick, imperfect parchment, bearing marks of stitched repairs and deep follicles. Illustrations include colored initials and decorative vignettes throughout. The book measures 51 x 34 cm. It is bound in embossed leather with intact bronze bosses (corner and center pieces) and clasps. The leather binding has been restored at the spine and foredges of the boards. A bookplate is pasted onto the interior of the back cover that reads, “Gabinetto di Restauro del Libro dell’Abbazia di Praglia,” which likely identifies the source of the restoration work. It is an imperfect copy, missing some leaves throughout.
Continue reading