New Finding Aid | Paula Gunn Allen papers

Special Collections and University Archives is pleased to announce a newly published finding aid for the Paula Gunn Allen papers (Coll 519). The finding aid is available on Archives West.

Publicity photo of Gunn and publishing contract
Publicity photo of Gunn and publishing contract, Paula Gunn Allen papers, Coll 519, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.

Paula Gunn Allen (1939-2008) was a Native American author, literary critic, activist, and scholar known for her contributions to American Indian studies and the nascent field of Indigenous feminism. She was also a founding leader in the contemporary women’s spirituality movement.

The collection documents Allen’s career as a poet, novelist, essayist, literary critic, and educator. The papers include manuscripts and supplementary material for the following published books: Grandmothers of the LightThe Woman Who Owned the ShadowsOff the ReservationSpider Woman’s GranddaughtersSong of the TurtleThe Sacred HoopAs Long as the Rivers Flow, and Skins and Bones. Other manuscripts include a collection of “haggles,” or short essays, screenplays, prefatory material, and unpublished works.

The collection also includes instructional material created by Allen including lecture transcripts, notes, diagrams, and handouts for workshops and seminars led by Paula Gunn Allen in Seattle and the Bay Area between 1984 and 1987. The subjects of these workshops include comparative spirituality, shamanic writing, and Rainbow Warriors. The collection also includes audio recordings of “haggles” and workshops, which require advance notice for use and the production of listening copies.

New Finding Aid | Sadakichi Hartmann papers

Special Collections and University Archives is pleased to announce a newly updated finding aid published for the Sadakichi Hartmann papers (Ax 523). The finding aid is available on Archives West.

The Sadakichi Hartmann papers is a collection compiled by writer, playwright, poet, actor, artist, art critic, and Bohemian, Sadakichi Hartmann (1867-1944). Hartmann was one of the early Greenwich Village and southern California Bohemians during the late 19th to early 20th centuries. The collection contains draft manuscripts and published works, many of which pertain to the arts, as well as correspondence, family photographs, and artwork.

Hartmann was born in Nagasaki, Japan to a German father and Japanese mother in 1867. In an autobiographical work published in Greenwich Village (1915), Hartmann described himself as:

Greenwich Village, edited by Guido Bruno, New York, 1915, Sadakichi Hartmann papers, Ax 523, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.

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Book Talk | HandiLand: The Crippest Place on Earth

Join us for a presentation by Elizabeth A. Wheeler (Associate Professor, Department of English and Director, Disability Studies Minor) for her newest book, HandiLand: The Crippest Place on Earth. Disability in Young Adult and Children’s Books (University of Michigan Press, 2019).

Book Talk: HandiLand: The Crippest Place on Earth
by Associate Professor Elizabeth A. Wheeler, Department of English

Monday, October 28th, 2019
3:30-5:30 p.m.
Special Collections Paulson Reading Room, Knight Library

Event is free and open to the public
To be followed by a Q&A and refreshments

Sponsored by Special Collections and University Archives

HandiLand: The Crippest Place on Earth is the first disability studies book on contemporary children’s and young adult literature. HandiLand claims that literature for young readers is the ideal viewing stand for a parade of political changes as youth with disabilities have infiltrated public space. This viewing stand allows us to see how far we’ve come toward defeating ableism and how far we still need to go. HandiLand examines the new prominence of youth with disabilities in contemporary English-language books from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Ghana. Many of these books are bestsellers with a passionate fan base, including The Fault in Our StarsHarry Potter, and Wonder. Elizabeth A. Wheeler argues that these new portrayals result from the Americans with Disabilities Act (1990) and other worldwide rights laws, which enabled the movement of disabled youth into public space.

This event is free and open to the public. Accommodations for people with disabilities will be provided if requested in advance by contacting the UO Accessible Education Center. See: https://aec.uoregon.edu/content/support-and-services

 

Renovation Update

The renovations in the Paulson Reading Room in Special Collections and University Archives are well underway. Contractors have removed the old circular reference desk and barriers.

The carpet has also been removed from the reading room and exterior hallway, revealing the previous flooring.

For more information or status updates on this project see Campus Planning and Facilities Management’s website, https://blogs.uoregon.edu/cpfmnotifications/2019/08/15/knight-library-205-and-206-renovation-advisory-8-19-9-27-19/

 

Temporary Closure of Reading Room

University of Oregon Special Collections and University Archives will be closed to the public from August 19th through September 30th. During the closure we are renovating the reading room and enhancing research services for our patrons. We expect to reopen on Tuesday, October 1st. Please contact us (spcarref@uoregon.edu) if you are planning a research visit during the first two weeks of October. Thank you for your patience.