Tagged: activism

Collection Highlight | Oregon Women’s Political History Collection

 

Political poster that reads "Win with Women"
Political poster, Oregon Women’s Political Caucus Records, Coll 369, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon

In honor of Women’s History Month, Special Collections and University Archives is highlighting the Oregon Women’s Political History Collection.

The Oregon Women’s Political History Collection comprises over a dozen individual manuscript collections. These collections constitute over 200 linear feet of manuscript material and represent women’s political and activist work in Oregon in the latter half of the twentieth century.  The collection was started in the 1990s as a collaborative collection development effort among UO Libraries, the Center for the Study of Women in Society (CSWS), and the Friends of the Oregon Women’s Political History Collection.

The collections include:

  •  Anderson, Jean Fuller Papers (Coll 312) 1978-1990, Finding aid
  • Davis, Eleanor Papers (Coll 351) 1963-1989  Finding aid
  • Dost, Jeanne Papers (Coll 366) 1972-1988  Finding aid
  • Dunn, Nancy Papers (Coll 362) 1986-1990  Finding aid
  • Eugene Women’s Crisis Center Records (Coll 313) 1977-1991  Finding aid
  • Fadeley, Nancy Papers (Coll 349) 1971-1989  Finding aid
  • Frye, Helen Papers (Coll 348) 1971-2011  Finding aid
  • Hendriksen, Margie Papers (Coll 365) 1971-1992  Finding aid
  • Kafoury, Gretchen Papers (Coll 353) 1971-1983  Finding aid
  • Milligan, Marian Papers (Coll 370) 1974-1983  Finding aid
  • Novick, Jane Papers (Coll 368) 1968-1990  Finding aid
  • Oregon Now Records (Coll 371) 1971-2006  Finding aid
  • Oregon Women’s Political Caucus Records (Coll 369) 1971-1999  Finding aid
  • Ryles, Nancy Papers (Coll 364) 1972-1990  Finding aid

Political pamphlet that says "We have a lot to win"Pol,tical button that says "I'm pro-choice and I vote"The activist women represented in these collections worked to increase women’s political engagement in Oregon and empower women to fully participate in elective politics and government agencies at the local, county, and state levels. The story of women’s political work in Oregon in the mid-to-late twentieth century has not been fully told; these primary documents–the sources necessary for the writing of history–are essential to that process. Through support by LSTA funding administered by the Oregon State Library, grant project staff were able to process, catalog, and publish finding aids for these collections and provide access to these collections.

Researchers can find out more about related SCUA collections documenting Women, Gender, and Sexuality in our research guides.

New Accessions: La Follette papers

Special Collections and University Archives is pleased to announce accessions of new poetical works in the Cameron La Follette papers. The finding aid for this collection (Coll 432) is available here.

Cameron La Follette is a graduate of the University of Oregon in 1984 and received a J.D. in Law from Columbia and a M.S. in Psychology from New York University. La Follette is a notable environmental activist in the state of Oregon who currently works as the Executive Director for the Oregon Coast Alliance. Her efforts in coastline preservation have also included work for the Coastal Futures Project for 1000 Friends of Oregon and the Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition.

Cover of Anamchara (2006) by Cameron La Follette.

La Follette is also a prolific poet whose work is intertwined with her environmental activism. La Follette has had one book of poetry published, in 2006, entitled Anamchara, of which SCUA has a copy. SCUA also holds a complete archive of La Follette’s poetry, which includes many hundreds of pieces. The collection includes original manuscript drafts, notebooks and typescripts of her poetry on the subjects of spirit, myth, and nature. La Follette also leads a Classical Poetry Group in her home of Salem, Oregon. This collection showcases an Oregonian environmental perspective in professional and creative works, both of which uniquely inspire and inform the other.

 

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The Bureaucracy and Red Tape: President Boyd’s Obstacles to Change at UO

This is the eighth of a series of blog posts highlighting the ongoing work of the Documenting UO History Project within the University Archives. A major part of this project is researching and documenting the often untold and hidden histories of the university’s diverse and underrepresented communities. This year our focus will continue to highlight Black history on campus, specifically Black student activism from the 1960s to present. Prior posts can be seen here.

President Boyd and “Animal House Director John Landis 1977, Courtesy University of Oregon Libraries

President William Beaty Boyd served as the University of Oregon President from 1975 to 1980. Boyd is remembered for restructuring the universities administration, and giving the provost predominant control of daily operations. He also worked with production crews from the creators of “Animal House,” and secured a contract so that the Oregon campus could serve as a backdrop for the film. Boyd’s tenure followed an incredibly contentious time for the university, though Boyd enjoyed a relatively calm period for the university. This post highlights his brief tenure and specific achievements related to committees and minority activism.

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New Faces: Similar Challenges

Anetra Brown 2013, photo courtesy of Anetra Brown

This is the sixth of a series of blog posts highlighting the ongoing work of the Documenting UO History Project within the University Archives. A major part of this project is researching and documenting the often untold and hidden histories of the university’s diverse and underrepresented communities. This year our focus will continue to highlight Black history on campus, specifically Black student activism from the 1960s to present. Prior posts can be seen here.

“It was the first time I noticed that being a black woman was going to be different here (Eugene).”

–Anetra Brown

2015 Oregon graduate and Black Student Union member Anetra Brown has remained in Eugene since graduation and has stayed connected with the University of Oregon through organizations like the Black Alumni Network, a group that has helped Brown feel more at home in Eugene. Anetra came to Eugene in September of 2011 to run on the track and field team, but academics were always her primary focus. Brown was born in San Francisco and moved to Indianapolis when she was 10. Upon her arrival to Eugene, Oregon’s lack of racial diversity was glaring. Although she describes the community as friendly, Brown says the feeling of isolation was undeniable. Through a recent oral history interview with Anetra for this project, this post highlights her specific experience at the University of Oregon and explores her reasons for choosing to remain in Eugene after graduation.

Brown said, “Living in the dorms was not the best experience, because I had a hard time finding girls I could relate to. It was the first time I noticed that being a black woman was going to be different here. Even things like hair — when I straightened my hair or even not washing my hair every day – and having to explain to roommates why I did that. It was the first time in my life where I felt different. I felt like I had to explain each thing I did. Or even not trying to come off as too aggressive in fear of being portrayed as the ‘angry black girl.’”

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New Resources for LGTBQ Special Collections

The University of Oregon Special Collections and University Archives holds a number of fascinating collections focused on LGBTQ history at the UO and throughout Oregon.

students

 

Creating Change: Forty Years of LGBTQ Activism at The University of Oregon is a new digital exhibit that celebrates the long history of LGTBQ activism at the University of Oregon. First staged as a physical exhibit at the Eugene Airport (Mahlon Sweet Field), its transitioned into a digital exhibit in time for the 25th anniversary of the formation of the Standing Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Concerns at the University of Oregon.

 

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