Tagged: photography

New Finding Aid | Dan Powell Photographs

Special Collections and University Archives is pleased to announce a newly updated finding aid for the Dan Powell photograph collection (PH297) now published on Archives West. This collection consists of constructed imagery and large format photographic prints taken by Powell between 1978 and 2012. Many of his works are also available to view online in the Dan Powell digital collection in Oregon Digital.

Dan Powell, “North of Alvord Desert,” 1989. PH297 Special Collections & University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, OR.

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New Collection: “Standoff” Photographs of Malheur NWR Occupation

Photograph from "Standoff" portfolio by Shawn Records.
Photograph from “Standoff” portfolio by Shawn Records. PH365, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.

Special Collections & University Archives is pleased to announce the recent acquisition of “Standoff,” a portfolio of photographs by Portland-based photographer Shawn Records. The photographs document the armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in January of 2016. Included are portraits of the militant Ammon Bundy and his family, as well as images of the media circus and protests that surrounded the occupation. This was a pivotal moment in Oregon and US history, when a group of armed men were able to occupy a government building without significant legal repercussion. The photographs are quiet and subtle, exploring the complex and fraught history of land use and cowboy culture in the American West. The portfolio is now available for viewing within the Special Collections & University Archives reading room.

Photograph from "Standoff" portfolio by Shawn Records.
Photograph from “Standoff” portfolio by Shawn Records. PH365, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.
Photograph from "Standoff" portfolio by Shawn Records.
Photograph from “Standoff” portfolio by Shawn Records. PH365, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.

By Danielle Mericle, Curator of Photography Collections

New Photograph Collection: Jacqueline Moreau papers

Chief Johnny Jackson stands at Lyle Point on the Columbia River. [Jacqueline Moreau papers, Coll 459, Box 10, Folder 4; Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.]
Chief Johnny Jackson stands at Lyle Point on the Columbia River. [Jacqueline Moreau papers, Coll 459, Box 10, Folder 4; Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.]
We are pleased to announce that a finding aid for the Jacqueline Moreau papers is now available on Archives West. The Jacqueline Moreau papers consist of an equal mixture of manuscript materials and photographs. The biographical material, correspondence, subject files, publications, and clippings that comprise the manuscript portion complement the photographic materials, providing historical context, and descriptive information about the photographs and Ms. Moreau’s work.

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From Curtis to Corinne: Selections from the University of Oregon Photography Collection

Special Collections and University Archives is pleased to announce the opening of its summer exhibition, From Curtis to Corinne: Selections from the University of Oregon Photography Collection. The exhibition features photographs from seven discrete collections, with work spanning over a century and addressing some of the most pressing issues of our time.

A Nakoaktok Chief's Daughter
A Nakoaktok Chief’s Daughter, Volume 10, The North American Indian

Chronologically the exhibition begins with photographs by Edward S. Curtis, who documented tribal life during the first half of the 20th century in his seminal project, The North American Indian.  This was a volatile period due to the effects of U.S. colonization of indigenous lands, which was radically altering and reshaping life for Native Americans in the area.  He wrote: “The information that is to be gathered . . . respecting the mode of life of one of the great races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost.”  As a counterpoint to Curtis’s work, we present images from the Angelus Company, a photography studio based in Portland in the early part of the 20th century.  These photographs document the impact of westward expansion on the environment and local terrain, and the growth of cities in the area.  Detached from their broader context, the Angelus images can be viewed as celebrations of modernity and the taming of the “Wild West.” When viewed alongside the Curtis images, they suggest a more sinister side to the assumptions of “manifest destiny,” forcing us to question what was being displaced as part of this process.   

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