Category: Manuscripts

New Finding Aid | Paula Gunn Allen papers

Special Collections and University Archives is pleased to announce a newly published finding aid for the Paula Gunn Allen papers (Coll 519). The finding aid is available on Archives West.

Publicity photo of Gunn and publishing contract
Publicity photo of Gunn and publishing contract, Paula Gunn Allen papers, Coll 519, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.

Paula Gunn Allen (1939-2008) was a Native American author, literary critic, activist, and scholar known for her contributions to American Indian studies and the nascent field of Indigenous feminism. She was also a founding leader in the contemporary women’s spirituality movement.

The collection documents Allen’s career as a poet, novelist, essayist, literary critic, and educator. The papers include manuscripts and supplementary material for the following published books: Grandmothers of the LightThe Woman Who Owned the ShadowsOff the ReservationSpider Woman’s GranddaughtersSong of the TurtleThe Sacred HoopAs Long as the Rivers Flow, and Skins and Bones. Other manuscripts include a collection of “haggles,” or short essays, screenplays, prefatory material, and unpublished works.

The collection also includes instructional material created by Allen including lecture transcripts, notes, diagrams, and handouts for workshops and seminars led by Paula Gunn Allen in Seattle and the Bay Area between 1984 and 1987. The subjects of these workshops include comparative spirituality, shamanic writing, and Rainbow Warriors. The collection also includes audio recordings of “haggles” and workshops, which require advance notice for use and the production of listening copies.

New Finding Aid | Sadakichi Hartmann papers

Special Collections and University Archives is pleased to announce a newly updated finding aid published for the Sadakichi Hartmann papers (Ax 523). The finding aid is available on Archives West.

The Sadakichi Hartmann papers is a collection compiled by writer, playwright, poet, actor, artist, art critic, and Bohemian, Sadakichi Hartmann (1867-1944). Hartmann was one of the early Greenwich Village and southern California Bohemians during the late 19th to early 20th centuries. The collection contains draft manuscripts and published works, many of which pertain to the arts, as well as correspondence, family photographs, and artwork.

Hartmann was born in Nagasaki, Japan to a German father and Japanese mother in 1867. In an autobiographical work published in Greenwich Village (1915), Hartmann described himself as:

Greenwich Village, edited by Guido Bruno, New York, 1915, Sadakichi Hartmann papers, Ax 523, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.

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New Finding Aid | Ursula K. Le Guin papers

Special Collections and University Archives is pleased to announce a new finding aid published for the Ursula K. Le Guin papers (Coll 270). The finding aid is available on Archives West.

[Portrait of Ursula K. Le Guin by Marian Wood Kolisch]
The Ursula K. Le Guin papers document Le Guin’s career as a novelist, short story writer, children’s author, essayist, and poet best known for her world-building science fiction and fantasy works. Her papers not only capture her public persona as an author, a teacher and mentor of other writers, and an activist for various causes throughout her lifetime, but also as a private individual devoted to the welfare of her family, friends, and community. The papers include correspondence, literary works, legal and financial files, public appearances and publicity materials, personal papers, photographs and artwork, audiovisual material, website and social media, and writing of others.

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Exhibit Highlight | UO Women’s Track and Field

We proudly celebrate the recent accomplishments of the UO women’s track and field team winning third place, winning 1st place in the distance medley relay, and winning the 3,000m individual title at the 2019 NCAA Division I Indoor Track and Field Championships.

The current exhibit, “Oregon Spirit: The Legacy of Track and Field,” highlights some key moments in the history of women’s track and field. The Women’s Athletic Association was founded in 1913, which offered additional opportunities for women to engage in athletics beyond physical education courses. According to the 1914 edition of the Oregana:

The first athletic organization ever to be perfected in the University in the interests of women’s athletics is the Women’s Athletic Association, which was organized during the past year. The purpose of this association is to encourage athletics among the women of the University and to develop a physically more efficient Oregon woman. (p.261)

Women participated in intramural, interclass and intercollegiate contests.  The exhibit includes two field day programs featuring track contests held on the hockey field, and on cemetery ridge.

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New Finding Aid | William Henry Fluhrer papers

Special Collections and University Archives is pleased to announce a new finding aid published for the William Henry Fluhrer papers (Ax 035). The finding aid is available on Archives West.

Portrait
[Portrait, William Henry Fluhrer papers, Ax 035, Box 1 Folder 1, Special Collections & University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.]
William H. Fluhrer, (1899-1948) known to friends and family as “Heinie,” was a prominent Medford, Oregon resident, and a veteran of both World War I and II. He was born on the Oregon Trail in 1899. His parents were German immigrants and established the Fluhrer Bakery in Medford Oregon, which William later ran. Fluhrer served in the Air Force in both World Wars. During his service in World War II he raised to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He was stationed in South America, Africa, Europe, and Asia during his service. Upon his return to the United States, Fluhrer ran for state office in Oregon in 1948. Fluhrer died in a plane crash before the election along with two state representatives and a representative nominee, whom Fluhrer was hosting at Lake of the Woods near Medford. Newspaper articles reporting on Fuhrer’s death included in the collection exemplify the significant presence he had in his community.

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