Category: Manuscripts

Processing the Quincy Scott Political Cartoons

Special Collections and University Archives is currently processing and writing a finding aid for the Quincy Scott collection of twentieth century political cartoons (GA Sc 85). This project was generously supported through an LSTA grant and will also include digitization of a selection of cartoons through the assistance of UO Libraries’ Digital Scholarship Services. This archival and digital collection will provide access to Oregonian political and social perspectives during the Great Depression and World War II through the humor and wit of political caricature. A future blog post will announce when the collection is fully processed and available to the public.

Quincy Scott for The Oregonian, “Has he bitten off more than he can chew?,” 1934 June 24. GA Sc 85. Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.

Portland resident Quincy Scott (1882-1965) was the editorial cartoonist for The Oregonian from 1931-1949 and this collection includes original artwork produced during his tenure at the newspaper, comprised of over 4,600 almost daily political cartoons. Scott was a faithful member of the Republican Party and his cartoons strongly reflect his personal stance on local, national, and international political topics, though Scott’s son/biographer notes that these opinions did not always fully align with those of the newspaper’s general editorial team. These cartoons illustrate early twentieth century life and politics in Oregon and will be particularly of interest to those researching the history of critical or conservative receptions of Depression-era legislation. Some of Scott’s frequently illustrated subjects will be highlighted in this post.

Continue reading

New Accessions: La Follette papers

Special Collections and University Archives is pleased to announce accessions of new poetical works in the Cameron La Follette papers. The finding aid for this collection (Coll 432) is available here.

Cameron La Follette is a graduate of the University of Oregon in 1984 and received a J.D. in Law from Columbia and a M.S. in Psychology from New York University. La Follette is a notable environmental activist in the state of Oregon who currently works as the Executive Director for the Oregon Coast Alliance. Her efforts in coastline preservation have also included work for the Coastal Futures Project for 1000 Friends of Oregon and the Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition.

Cover of Anamchara (2006) by Cameron La Follette.

La Follette is also a prolific poet whose work is intertwined with her environmental activism. La Follette has had one book of poetry published, in 2006, entitled Anamchara, of which SCUA has a copy. SCUA also holds a complete archive of La Follette’s poetry, which includes many hundreds of pieces. The collection includes original manuscript drafts, notebooks and typescripts of her poetry on the subjects of spirit, myth, and nature. La Follette also leads a Classical Poetry Group in her home of Salem, Oregon. This collection showcases an Oregonian environmental perspective in professional and creative works, both of which uniquely inspire and inform the other.

 

Continue reading

New Acquisition: Kentucky Manumission, 1801

Special Collections and University Archives has recently added to its collections a manumission written in 1801 by Moses Hall of Nicholas County, Kentucky. This manuscript document is a contract stating that Hall will free Dinah, a black female slave, when she reaches her 23rd birthday in five months (March 10, 1802).

Manumission was the act of freeing a slave by a slave owner, through a deed or will. This act of an individual contrasts with a governmental directive to free slaves, such as the Emancipation Proclamation issued by President Lincoln in 1863. Manumission in the United States was done for a variety of reasons, ranging from a sentimental gesture to a method of incentivizing obedience at the prospect of eventual freedom. However, the practice became increasingly regulated in order to limit the population of freed black residents in the colonies starting in Virginia in 1691 when a law was passed that required freed slaves to leave the colony within six months and for the previous slave owner to pay for the trip.

Continue reading

New Acquisition: Medieval Deed

The library has recently acquired a Medieval deed recording the sale of a parcel of land in Norfolk that will aid students and researchers interested in the study of the history of law and land-holding in Western Europe.

This document is a type of late Medieval land deed called a feoffment which records the sale of real land or structures between two parties. These types of deeds were born out of the feudal system of land holding in England where a vassal was granted possession of a lord’s land (a fief) in exchange for service and the serfs, peasants who lived on the land, in turn served the land-holders. When granting a fief a vassal promised an oath of fealty, from the Latin fidelitas or fidelity, which included military or non-military service to the lord.

Continue reading

New Acquisition: Collection of Medieval Paleography and Illumination Specimens

Special Collections and University Archives has added to its collections a packet of ten individual manuscript leaves useful for the teaching of medieval manuscript writing and illumination of Western Europe from the 13th to 15th century.

The set represents a variety of scribal hand styles, levels of decoration, and time periods in manuscript codex production including the late Middle Ages and early Renaissance. Over this span of time, manuscript production became increasingly secularized as books came to be created and bound outside of the monastic scriptoria in Europe and available to the laity. The specimen leaves are exclusively works on parchment, but they vary in dimension, layout, and genre, including choirbooks, devotionals, and contemporary Medieval writing. Most are written in Latin, but vernacular works are also represented, including a Dutch Book of Hours. Continue reading