SOJC’s “What Is Information?” Conference

Coming up this weekend (starting tonight in fact!) is the SOJC’s annual “What Is…?” conference that is always of interest to the NMCC community. The event is free and open to everyone in the UO community. Check it out for a little bit of isolation relief.

 

This year’s theme and conference title is What is Information?

 

 

What is Information? (2020) will investigate conceptualizations and implementations of information via material, representational, and hybrid frames. The cyberconference will consider information and its transformational effects and affects—from documents to data; from facts and fictions to pattern recognition; from differential equations to physical information; and from volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity to collective intelligence and wisdom.

 

This conference is free and open to all UO affiliates.  Please click on the registration link (https://blogs.uoregon.edu/whatisinformation/registration/) to join a waitlist so you can be verified by conference organizers before receiving the link for the virtual sessions.

 

… and a special thanks to Janet Wasko and Jeremy Swartz for their quick work in porting the annual conference to an online format this year!

Feb 27 Book Talk: How We Became Our Data

Join Us for a Public Book Talk on:

How We Became Our Data

by NMCC Director & Assoc. Prof. Colin Koopman

 

Thursday, Feb. 27, 6:30 p.m.
110 Knight Law Center on the UO Campus
1515 Agate St.

In his book How We Became Our Data, UO philosophy professor Colin Koopman excavates early moments of our rapidly accelerating data-tracking technologies and their consequences for how we think of and express our selfhood today. Koopman explores the emergence of mass-scale record keeping systems like birth certificates and social security numbers, as well as new data techniques for categorizing personality traits, measuring intelligence, and even racializing subjects. This all culminates in what Koopman calls the “informational power” we are all now subject to.

 

Colin Koopman is associate professor of philosophy and director of the New Media & Culture Program at the University of Oregon. His previous books include Pragmatism as Transition: Historicity and Hope in James, Dewey, and Rorty (2009); Genealogy as Critique: Foucault and the Problems of Modernity (2013). His essays and articles have appeared in The New York Times and Aeon as well as in academic journals such as Critical Inquiry, Contemporary Political Theory, Diacritics, and New Media & Society.

 

This event is presented by the Wayne Morse Center’s Program for Democratic Governance. Cosponsored by the UO Department of Philosophy and UO Data Science Initiative.

New Class on Media Archaeology coming in Spring of 2020

A quick update on a new course being taught by NMCC Director Colin Koopman. I’m now in my second year as Director of NMCC and I’m very happy to announce a new graduate course on media archaeology and media genealogy I’ll be teaching in Spring of 2020 (note the year, not this coming term, but in a year from now).

From Archaeology to Media Genealogy will be a graduate offering focusing on the canonical work of media archaeologists such as Friedrich Kittler, Cornelia Vismann, and Wolfgang Ernst (as well as other figures of the ‘German School of Media Archaeology’). We will then explore recent work moving toward media genealogy, some of which was announced in a recent special section on Media Genealogy at the International Journal of Communications. All of this will take place against the trajectory of the work of Michel Foucault, and his own movement from philosophical archaeology to philosophical genealogy, though no prior knowledge of Foucault will be expected.

The course will be offered through the Philosophy Department and will be open to graduate students of any major. The course will be focused primarily on theory and history, but I have expansive conceptions of both of these. I’d love (!) to have NMCC students from any discipline in this course and in fact you all are the reason I am teaching this.

[Note that the course will be offered as a 400/500 but will be taught at the graduate level throughout and will also include separate grad-student-only meetings once per week (the times for these will be built into the class schedule announced on DuckWeb once the course is up for registration).]

If you have any questions, please email me at koopman@uoregon.edu.

Open GE position with NMCC co-founder Dr. Carol Stabile

Check out a new GE position providing support to the Associate Dean for Strategic Initiatives on the Tykeson Hall programming project:

https://gradschool.uoregon.edu/node/3143

The position include basic research as requested, creating, filing, archiving, organizing and otherwise managing electronic content, including documents, photographs, files and folders; use and management of Excel files and databases, communications support (i.e. emails to faculty); meeting and event staffing and support; proofreading and fact-checking, and other duties as assigned.

Applicants should send their materials (standard GE application and one page cover letter) to the casdean@uoregon.edu inbox by March 1.

NMCC Lecture on Mon, Apr 16: Intel’s Melissa Gregg

“Counterproductive”

Please join us next Monday April 16th at 4pm for this year’s NMCC Lecture by anthropologist, author, and Intel researcher Melissa Gregg.  Her lecture, titled “Counterproductive: Time Management in a Knowledge Economy,” will focus on topics of contemporary time management and workplace imperatives of productivity, with special attention to the impacts of technological approaches to organizing our time. In bridging academic work in new media theory and research contributions to the tech industry, Gregg’s thinking charts ambitious new paths through our contemporary technological milieu.

 

Dr. Gregg’s presentation will be drawing from her in-progress book, Counterproductive: A brief history of time management (forthcoming with Duke University Press). Her previous publications include Work’s Intimacy (Polity, 2011), The Affect Theory Reader (Duke UP, 2010), Cultural Studies’ Affective Voices (Palgrave 2006), numerous articles in The Atlantic, and a contribution to the recent multi-author volume Data: Now Bigger and Better! (Prickly Paradigm Press, 2016).

Melissa Gregg is Principal Engineer and Director of Smart Home Research at Intel.

 

Following the talk, we will host a catered reception.

 

This event is sponsored by the New Media and Culture Certificate, the Art & Technology Program, the Graduate School, and the College of Arts & Sciences.

 

Join us on Monday, April 16th at 4pm in the Knight Library Browsing Room. 

 

 

NMCC Book Forum: Save the Date

'A Capsule Aesthetic' book cover

Save the date for the 2017-18 NMCC Book Forum, scheduled for Winter term on Friday March 9, 2018 at 2:00 in the Knight Library Browsing Room. Refreshments (and wine!) will be served after the conversation.

This year’s NMCC Book Forum will feature a panel of UO faculty discussing Kate Mondloch‘s just-out (to be published in January 2018, actually) A Capsule Aesthetic: Feminist Materialisms in New Media Art (University of Minnesota Press).

Our book discussants will be Michael Allan (UO, Comparative Literature), Stephanie LeManager (UO, English & Environmental Studies), and Daniel Rosenberg (UO, Clark Honors College, History).  The discussion will then feature a response from Kate Mondloch.  NMCC Director Colin Koopman will moderate the session.

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Welcome Back to a New School Year

As a new school year kicks into gear, NMCC wants to send a note of welcome (and welcome back) to NMCC students, new prospective students, and our faculty affiliates.

As you get ready for your classes, we wanted to draw your attention again to the list of NMCC-eligible courses. We updated this list over summer, so check it out to see if there’s a course of interest to you that can count toward your NMCC certificate.

We also wanted to draw your attention to one new course offering that came online over summer so would not have been on your radar back in Spring. Jeremiah Favara’s ‘Digital Cultures and Sexualities’ in WGS will interrogate digital cultures as multi-faceted sites composed of material technologies, social practices, and cultural meanings that convey ideas about sexuality and gender. Drawing on the work of gender studies and new media scholars, the course will explore how sexuality and gender is articulated through narratives of technological innovation, the role of sexuality and the digital in processes of identity formation, and the possibilities and limits of digital worlds for disrupting, reinforcing, and/or challenging sexualized and gendered dynamics of power. For more information on the course see our latest NMCC blog post.

Lastly, Colin and Laura just wanted to again introduce ourselves as the new NMCC leadership. Colin Koopman (Associate Professor of Philosophy) has taken over as Director of NMCC from Kate Mondloch in the College of Design — Colin works on the politics of information, media archaeology, and data genealogy. Laura Strait (an advanced Ph.D. candidate in Media Studies in SOJC) is our new social media coordinator and administrative assistant — she works on feminism and technology, and new media and social movements.

The two of us are excited to work toward further deepening the NMCC community here on campus. We will be organizing a few open houses over the course of the year as well as a few academic-plus-social events, including a faculty book discussion, and (we hope) an invited guest lecture. Stay tuned on the blog for details on our upcoming Fall open house. In the interim, contact one or both of us with any NMCC questions you may have and we can set up a meeting or chat via email.  We’re here for you.

Fall Course Listings Updated

Taking a brief break from summer here in anticipation of gearing up for Fall term classes… we wanted to post an updated listing of fall term courses now available on the NMCC 2017-18 courses page.

A newly-arrived course offering that will be of interest to many of you is a brand-new class in WGS titled ‘Digital Cultures and Sexualities‘.  This course will interrogate digital cultures as multi-faceted sites composed of material technologies, social practices, and cultural meanings that convey ideas about sexuality and gender. Drawing on the work of gender studies and new media scholars such as Anne Balsamo, Tom Boellstorff, A.R. Stone, Amy Adele Hasinoff, and others, the course will explore how sexuality and gender is articulated through narratives of technological innovation, the role of sexuality and the digital in processes of identity formation, and the possibilities and limits of digital worlds for disrupting, reinforcing, and/or challenging sexualized and gendered dynamics of power.

The course will be taught by Jeremiah Favara, a graduate of our very own New Media and Culture certificate program here at UO and this year an instructor in WGS. Jeremiah’s research focuses on the roles of gender, sexuality, race, technology, and history in media production and representations.