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May 15, 2018

18 Chemistry and Biochemistry Undergrad Researchers will participate in Research Symposium May 17th

photo: UG Research Poster sessionThe UO’s eighth Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium is Thursday, May 17, 2018.  The event will host 382 undergraduates engaged in original research, creative work, and community-based projects from over 71 majors, 13 minors, and eight colleges. The full schedule and research abstracts are available here

Eighteen undergraduates will be presenting their chemistry and biochemistry research at the following sessions:

Concurrent Oral Session 2 – 11:45-1:15 p.m.

SPRUCE ROOM – SESSION 2S: CHEMISTRY, MATH, AND COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

Makenna Pennel − CHEMISTRY
Nanoparticles!
Faculty Mentor(s): Jim Hutchison, Kenyon Plummer

Concurrent Oral Session 3 – 1:30-3:00 p.m.

MAPLE ROOM – SESSION 3M: DNA & GENES

Rachel David − BIOCHEMISTRY
Investigating the Role of Genomic Positioning in Directing Meiotic Double-Strand DNA Break Repair
Faculty Mentor(s): Diana Libuda, Erik Toraason

 

Poster Session – 5:30-7:30 p.m.

EMU BALLROOM & GUMWOOD ROOM

HUSSEIN AL-ZUBIERI − BIOCHEMISTRY
Determining Scrib binding partners relevant to its spindle orienting function
Faculty Mentor(s): Ken Prehoda, Nicole Paterson

DYLAN BARDGETT − CHEMISTRY
Quantitative Analysis of Thin Films via X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy
Faculty Mentor(s): David Johnson

BRIAN CHASTAIN − GENERAL SCIENCE
The Effect of Different Substituents on the Optoelectronic Properties of Diindenoanthracene
Faculty Mentor(s): Michael Haley, Justin Dressler

ANSON DANG − BIOCHEMISTRY
Mapping Interactions Of Single-Stranded (Ss) DNA With the Ss-DNA Binding Protein (Gp32) of the T4 DNA Replication Complex at Specific Nucleotide Residue Positions
Faculty Mentor(s): Pete von Hippel

WILLIAM EDGELL − BIOCHEMISTRY
Synthesis of Alkyne Substituted Cycloparaphenylenes for Conjugated Polymers Research Area: Organic Synthetic Chemistry
Faculty Mentor(s): Ramesh Jasti

ADRIAN GORDON − CHEMISTRY
Title: Energetic Loss From the Use of Hole Scavengers to Measure Photoelectrochemical Cell Efficiency Limits
Faculty Mentor(s): Shannon Boettcher

SHAYAN LOUIE − BIOCHEMISTRY
Synthesis and Characterization of Ru(II) Cycloparaphenylene Complexes
Faculty Mentor(s): Ramesh Jasti, Jeff Van Raden

ALEXANDER LYGO − PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY
Properties and Synthesis of Three Component Heterostructure: (BiSe)1+δ(Bi2Se3)1+ δ (BiSe)1+ δ (TiSe2)
Faculty Mentor(s): David Johnson

SHAWN MELENDY − BIOCHEMISTRY
Assay of Insulin-Stimulated Signaling by Flow Cytometry: Key Points of Regulation Research Area: Natural/Physical Science
Faculty Mentor(s): Carrie McCurdy, Byron Hetrick

TRISTAN MISTKAWI − BIOCHEMISTRY
Synthesis of 7,14-Diarylfluoreno[3,2-b]fluorenes
Faculty Mentor(s): Josh Barker, Michael Haley

BENJAMIN MULLER − CHEMISTRY
Modeling the Behavior of Pyruvic Acid at the Air-Water Interface Research
Faculty Mentor(s): Brittany Gordon, Dr. Geraldine Richmond

MADELYN SCOTT − CHEMISTRY
Optimization of Deposition Techniques for Thin Film Production and Analysis
Faculty Mentor(s): Cathy Wong, Kelly Wilson

KEVIN SPIES − BIOCHEMISTRY
Developmental Synchronization Of The Purple Pitcher Plant Mosquito, Wyeomyia Smithii, as a Result Of Increasing Temperatures
Faculty Mentor(s): William Bradshaw, Christina Holzapfel

MARIBELLE STANLEY − PRE-CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Drug Development with New Catalytic Molecules
Faculty Mentor(s): David Tyler

ASHLEE VISE − CHEMISTRY
Characterization of GaSbP as a photocathode For Water-Splitting
Faculty Mentor(s): James Young

CYRUS WATERS − BIOCHEMISTRY
Synthesis of 6,13-pentacene-incorporated [10]cycloparaphenylene
Faculty Mentor(s): Ramesh Jasti, Brittany White

Dissertation Defense – Loni Kringle, May 22nd

Photo: Loni KringleGood luck to Loni Kringle as she defends her thesis for her PhD in Chemistry!

Tuesday, May 22, 2018 at 2:00 PM
240 D Willamette Hall

The title of her dissertation is “Local Structure and Dynamics of Exciton-Coupled Cyanine Dimers Labeled in DNA”

May 14, 2018

Dissertation Defense – Samantha Young, May 21st

Good luck to Samantha Young as she defends her thesis for her PhD in Chemistry!

Monday, May 21, 2018
9:00 AM in 171 Onyx Bridge

The title of her dissertation is “Designing the nanoparticle/electrode interface for improved electrocatalysis”

May 9, 2018

Samantha Young & Nicole Paterson to Participate in 2018 Grad Forum

Photo: Poster Session, Graduate ForumChemistry graduate students Samantha Young and Nicole Paterson will be participating in the 2018 Graduate Student Research Forum on Friday, May 11th.

Samantha, a member of the Hutchison lab, will present on the Dixon Scholars Panel from 10:00- 11:00am in the EMU Swindells Room.

The Dixon Fellows are recipients of the Julie and Rocky Dixon Graduate Student Innovation Award, which supports doctoral students interested in developing their skills and experiencein innovation and/or entrepreneurship in preparation for careers outside of academia. Each year, the Dixon Fellows present at the Grad Forum to showcase their experiences and findings.

Nicole, a member of the Prehoda lab, will present her research at the Poster Session from 12:00 – 2:00pm EMU Ballroom.  Her presentation is titled “Role of Gukholder and Scribble in Spindle Orientation.”

The full schedule of events for the 2018 Grad Forum is available at bit.ly/2KL6dfI

 

Dissertation Defense – Justin Barry, May 18th

Good luck to Justin Barry as he defends his thesis for his PhD in Chemistry!

Friday, May 18, 2018
12PM in 331 Klamath Hall

The title of his dissertation is “The Solvent Cage Effect: Using Microviscosity to Predict the Recombination Efficiency of Geminate Radicals Formed by the Photolysis of the Mo-Mo Bond of Cpʹ2Mo2(CO)6

 

April 13, 2018

Three Chemistry Graduate Students Selected for Fellowship Awards

UO Dissertation Research Fellowship:

Forrest Laskowski, Boettcher Lab

2018 NSF Graduate Research Fellowships:

Ruth Maust, Jasti Lab

Trevor Shear, Darren Johnson Lab (more…)

April 6, 2018

Perfect Chemistry in the Oregon Quarterly

UOWGS Members - Photograph by Charlie Litchfield, University Communications

UO Women in Graduate Sciences (WGS) was established in 2005 by Chemistry graduate student Sarah Staggs Wisser, who worked in the Darren Johnson lab. With a current membership of 150, WGS at Oregon is one of the largest graduate student women’s groups in the country. The success of WGS is so uncommon, other university student groups nationwide are seeking directions about how to start and maintain a student women’s science organization of their own.

Read more in the Oregon Quarterly article.

January 11, 2018

Biochemistry Majors Tristan Mistkawi and Alex Egdell Recieve Research Minigrants

Photo: Alex Edgell & Trstan Mistkawi

(L-R) Alex Edgell & Tristan Mistkawi

Biochemistry majors Tristan Mistkawi and Alex Egdell are among nine UO undergraduate researchers awarded minigrants through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP), a unit within the Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation.  The $1000 awards are given to students to assist with research expenses including purchasing supplies and materials and paying for travel that is necessary to conduct research.

Tristan is conducting research in the Haley lab on electronic properties of indenofluorenes and their derivatives, and Alex is in the Jasti lab doing reasearch focused on the synthesis of alkyne substituted cycloparaphenylenes for conjugated polymers. Both scholars will present their research at the UO Undergraduate Research Symposium on May 17, 2018.

Read more in AroundtheO, or visit the minigrant website for a full list of scholars with descriptions of their research projects.

 

 

December 7, 2017

Haugland Fellowship Awarded to Kira Egelhofer

Photo - Kira EgelhoferKira Egelhofer has been selected as the next recipient of the Rosaria Haugland Graduate Research Fellowship. The Fellowship, established by Dr. Rosaria Haugland in 2004, is awarded every three years by the UO Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry to an outstanding graduate student in Chemistry.  It covers the recipient’s stipend, tuition, and miscellaneous fees for a three-year period. Kira was selected from a pool of applicants by a faculty committee who were impressed by Kira’s science and her work to engage women and minorities in STEM.

Kira grew up in Anchorage, Alaska, with a passion for nature and outdoor learning.  In high school, a tough-but-inspiring female science teacher sparked Kira’s interest in chemistry, and led her to pursue an undergraduate degree in Chemistry at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon, with a thesis project in Environmental Chemistry.

Kira entered the UO chemistry PhD program in 2015, and jump-started her studies in solar energy by taking masters courses the preceding summer that were offered by the UO masters internship program, and taught by Fuding Lin, Benjamin Alemán, Jim Hutchison, and Mark Lonergan.

Now in her third year, Kira is a member of the Lonergan lab.  Her research involves measuring the selectivity and recombination of contacts to solar cells. “We are interested in these parameters because they impact solar cell efficiency,” Kira explains. “More specifically, I seek to understand how and why very thin layers of semiconducting or insulating materials inserted between the bulk material and contact of the solar cell impact selectivity and recombination. This information helps us rationally design solar cells with improved characteristics, such as efficiency.”

In addition to her research, Kira has been a member of the UO Women in Graduate Sciences since her first term at the UO. The goal of WGS is to involve and retain more women in the sciences.  Kira enjoys the opportunity to promote science with K-12 students, young adults, and the wider community through a variety of WGS outreach activities.  She currently serves as the organization’s Fundraising Chair, and is looking forward to their hosting a visit from Astronaut Wendy Lawrence for WGS’s annual fundraiser in March.

As for what the future might hold after completing her doctoral degree, Kira has no firm plans, but a few possibilities appeal to her – such as writing for scientific journals with a focus on communicating science to the general public, or working in solar energy research and development, perhaps even for NASA or SpaceX.

 

– By Leah O’Brien

November 9, 2017

Check out the 2017 UO Chemistry and Biochemistry Newsletter!

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