“Stuck on Collecting: The Art of Japanese Votive Slips, 1860 to 1930,” the new UO Libraries SCUA, CAPS, and Oregon Digital sponsored display-case exhibition, is now on display at in the Knight Library lobby. Visitors can peruse examples of Edo Period nōsatsu collecting and exchanging traditions, including vibrant and intricate depictions of how votive slips were created and used. The collaborative brainchild of UO faculty and staff, including Japan Studies Librarian Kevin McDowell and Maude I. Kerns Associate Professor of Japanese Art & Director of Undergraduate Studies Dr. Akiko Walley, the exhibit introduces viewers to the cultural context and history of the UO’s collection, and visitors come to understand key terminology as well as some of the interesting debates about the role of votive slips in Japanese society. For instance, the exhibit programmers highlight early-nineteenth century sanctions that attempted to deter the pasting of the slips on temple shrines and gates because, according to official documents, it was “no more than ‘pointless graffiti.'” The exhibit also parses a fun example of a nōsatsu of a nōsatsu-kai, the votive slip trading and exchange club at work. Take a moment to get stuck on votive slip collecting, this spring!

“Tengu Kohei, the ‘patron saint’ of nōsatsu aficionados”

The exhibit also parses a fun example of a nōsatsu of a nōsatsu-kai, the votive slip trading and exchange club at work:

pasting and trading votive slip

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The exhibit coincides with Friday’s (03/10/2017) visiting nōsatsu specialist, Professor Masaya Takiguchi (Seijo University):

Upcoming Talk: Edo Period Popular Culture and Nōsatsu

Exhibit photographs provided by Josh.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*