Honors Program

Honors Program Ninkasi Site Visit

In late November the Business Honors Program had its fall site visit at Ninkasi. Students toured the ever-expanding facilities and heard from Cofounder Jamie Floyd, Chief People Officer Cheryl Collins, Communications Director Ali Fishner, and Chief Financial Officer Nigel Francisco.

Getting to talk to so many people at Ninkasi was insightful because each had his or her own role in making the company a success. It was great to see how far Ninkasi has come, and hear about where it’s going next.

Some of the things students were surprised to learn is that Ninkasi has its own recording studio, an artist in residence initiative, and that one of its goals is to own the entire block that its facilities currently occupy.

After the site visit students went to Tacovore, another local business in Eugene’s Whitaker District, and had lunch. The trip was another great example of the close-knit Business Honors Program experience in which students undertake business site visits and educational opportunities together, learning from each other via reflections on their shared experiences and developing lifelong personal and professional bonds.

Story by Katie Breeden ’17. Breeden is a junior studying business administration and digital arts and president of the UO Entrepreneurship Club. In summer 2016, Breeden will be continuing classes in Eugene and interning with Drive Creative Agency. She will graduate in spring 2017.

Written by UO Business

The UO Lundquist College of Business empowers an engaged community of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders who create, apply, and disseminate knowledge that contributes significantly to their professions, communities, and society. The college delivers a dynamic learning environment where world-class professors engage and get to know students, where students work on real projects for real companies, and where alumni go on to high-powered jobs worldwide.

Honors Ropes Challenge

On October 3, 2015, the newest Business Honors Program cohort participated in the annual Challenge Ropes Course. The ropes course trip was a team-building exercise in which the 34 incoming honors students got to know each other by using their combined mental and physical strengths to complete a series of feats.

“While at first I was a little nervous, once we got started I realized that this was a group filled with individuals who were very similar to me and that the situations that we were about to be put in were ones that we would get through together,” said Aleck Watters ’17. Watters, a junior studying accounting and economics with a minor in computer information technology, will join PwC in their Portland office as a risk assurance intern in the summer of 2017.

The Challenge Ropes Course starts the honors students’ experience off on the right foot. The majority of the challenge is mental. Participants have to be willing to face the obstacles head on. Many of the obstacles have a height factor, which can be intimidating. Additionally, members must quickly build trust with their group. The Honors Program continues to mandate the lower cohort participate in this amazing event, not only because it challenges them mentally, but because it lays the foundation for leadership and team building—skills the program helps foster and which will serve students well in their careers.

Written by UO Business

The UO Lundquist College of Business empowers an engaged community of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders who create, apply, and disseminate knowledge that contributes significantly to their professions, communities, and society. The college delivers a dynamic learning environment where world-class professors engage and get to know students, where students work on real projects for real companies, and where alumni go on to high-powered jobs worldwide.

Honors Business Program

Honors Alumni Networking Event

On February 26, 2015, current Business Honors students met up with alumni at the White Stag Block in Portland for dinner and networking at the annual honors alumni networking event.

The alumni networking event was a great opportunity for us to meet and interact with past Business Honors students who are currently excelling in their respective fields. We met alumni from various graduating classes who currently work in industries like investment banking, management consulting, tech, accounting, and many others. Being able to network over dinner meant gaining personal insight about current industry trends, as well as unique job and internship opportunities.

The night started with networking over dinner. Honors students were able to sit near professionals with similar career goals and talk while enjoying the catered food. The event then transitioned into a panel discussion about career paths, the impact of the honors program, and other topics sparked by a question and answer session. The alumni panelists—Ryan Dangaran, Brian Feeney, Ashley Lund, Nicole Wickswat, and Renn Anderson—spoke about their experiences in the program and described the traits they look for when hiring. The panel discussion helped us learn how we could stand out when we apply to competitive jobs and industries.

After the panelists finished taking questions, attendees were free to continue building connections with the professionals on a more casual basis, which created a great networking atmosphere.

— Xiao Liang ’17 and Josh Bryant ’17

XiaoLiang

Bio: Xiao Liang is an accounting major and economics minor who will graduate in 2017. His dream career is to work for a Big Three consulting firm.

JoshBryantANE

Bio: Josh Bryant is currently a sophomore studying business administration with a concentration in finance and economics. He hopes to one day work in private equity. A fun fact about Josh is that his parents own a blueberry farm in Albany, Oregon.

 

Written by UO Business

The UO Lundquist College of Business empowers an engaged community of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders who create, apply, and disseminate knowledge that contributes significantly to their professions, communities, and society. The college delivers a dynamic learning environment where world-class professors engage and get to know students, where students work on real projects for real companies, and where alumni go on to high-powered jobs worldwide.

Honors Business Program

Honors Program Ninkasi Site Visit

Ninkasi was the first site visit I attended with the Honors Program. I did not know what to expect or how it would connect with my own experiences. I was apprehensive because of my lack of knowledge around beer and the brewing industry but I still found the visit extremely interesting and felt that I learned a lot.

We met with staff members from different areas of the company and toured their new brewing facilities. We covered topics from their financial structure to the cool projects they were working on, such as new flavors and launching yeast into space. They told us that the reason they included a rock climbing wall and a rooftop bar in their headquarters was because it created the culture they were trying to foster.

As a student pursuing a marketing concentration, the most interesting thing to me was discussing how they decided on which areas of the state and country they would distribute to. They are growing very quickly but they are very selective about where they distribute because they want to make sure that the product is moving quickly and customers are getting it relatively fresh. This can pose a challenge for them in smaller markets and showed a direct application of some of the principles I was learning in class.

What made this opportunity and experience even better was the fact that I got to share it with many of my closest friends. Walking around Ninkasi, learning about how they are growing and developing, along with the great conversation and questions of my peers, made this site visit fun and memorable. I would encourage all those who have to chance to attend site visits in the future to do so and to make the most of every opportunity being in honors affords us.

—Rebecca Kistler ’15

RebeccaKistlerNinkasiBio: Rebecca Kistler is currently studying business administration and psychology and will graduate in the fall of 2015. Her dream career is to work on the marketing and advertising of headline tours with Live Nation and a fun fact about her is that she was a camp counselor for five years.

Written by UO Business

The UO Lundquist College of Business empowers an engaged community of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders who create, apply, and disseminate knowledge that contributes significantly to their professions, communities, and society. The college delivers a dynamic learning environment where world-class professors engage and get to know students, where students work on real projects for real companies, and where alumni go on to high-powered jobs worldwide.

Honors Business Program

Honors Program Paintball Social

Twenty-five students from the Lundquist College of Business Honors Program set out for the evening to Paintball Palace, Lane County’s premier paintball and laser tag destination. This was an opportunity to apply the skills learned within the classroom out on the paintball arena. Critical thinking and strategic communication skills with other teammates were the key to succeeding in the war zone. This event was a great bonding opportunity and an awesome experience outside of Lillis with both honors cohorts coming together.

It is safe to say I was not the most outstanding player out there. I’ll admit, my loyalty to fellow team members was tested as friendly fire did come from my direction. It showed peoples’ true colors and tested their endurance. Blood, sweat, and tears were shed, but we all came out as better friends at the end of the night.

The Honors Program social events are an opportunity to create memories and build stronger friendships within the cohort. My experience in the program during the past two years has shaped me into the individual I am today and has prepared me for life after college. I have made lifelong friendships with some of the most genuine and intelligent students at the university and cannot thank the Honors Program enough for the variety of opportunities provided to me during my time in Eugene.

—James Coghill ’15

JamesCoghillPaintballBio: James Coghill is a senior in the Business Honors Program who will graduate in June of 2015 with a degree in business administration with a concentration in marketing and a minor in economics. Coghill looks forward to starting his career with Kroger in its general merchandise department.

Written by UO Business

The UO Lundquist College of Business empowers an engaged community of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders who create, apply, and disseminate knowledge that contributes significantly to their professions, communities, and society. The college delivers a dynamic learning environment where world-class professors engage and get to know students, where students work on real projects for real companies, and where alumni go on to high-powered jobs worldwide.

Honors at Autzen

On Saturday November 22, the Lundquist College’s Undergraduate Business Honors Program hosted more than 80 alumni and current students for a tailgate celebration before the Ducks played the Colorado Buffaloes.

The reunion provided current students with the opportunity to connect with program alumni and gain insight into transitioning into the professional world, as well as network for future internship and job opportunities.

Attendees socialized over a catered barbecue. In addition to meeting alumni, students had the opportunity to socialize with current honors faculty and Lundquist College administration.

“It was great to spend time with alumni, faculty, and my peers outside of the traditional classroom setting, I look forward to coming back as an alumni next year,” said Maury Bardovi, a current senior in the program.

In addition to benefiting current students, the event served as a great opportunity for alumni to give back to the program they graduated from.

The Honors Program has focused on bridging the gap between current students and alumni and the tailgate was another great way of achieving that goal. In addition to the tailgate, the program will host both current students and alumni for dinner and a question and answer panel at its annual networking event in downtown Portland next term.

Please contact program director Deb Bauer (djbauer@uoregon.edu) with any questions regarding the Business Honors Program.

Written by Maury Bardovi

Giving Back in Los Fierros, Nicaragua

This past spring break, I was one of ten students from the Lundquist College Honors Program who traveled to Nicaragua on a service trip. Working in partnership with Panorama Service Expeditions, we built a house in Los Fierros, a village near the city of Managua.

This experience was made possible by the incredibly generous donations from the Lundquist College of Business, Oregon Community Credit Union, Allann Bros, and Mike Dore. We are also very grateful to Deb Bauer, director of the Honors Program, who spent her spring break working side by side with us and contributed greatly to our experience over the week.

For all of us, the experience offered the opportunity to give back to a community that desperately needed assistance while also immersing ourselves in Nicaraguan culture. It also gave us a new perspective on the endless resources we are provided with in the United States.

The purpose of the week was to give back to the community of Los Fierros by building a house for a local family—in just five days. Our group worked together with students from University of California San Diego. Each morning we traveled about forty-five minutes on what was mainly a dirt road to reach the village of Los Fierros. There, we worked tirelessly in the 100-degree weather to reach our daily goals. On Monday, we built the foundation for the entire house. By Friday, we added the finishing touches to a completed house.

As college students, we live in our planners—especially during dead and finals week—so I didn’t have time to really cultivate any expectations for this trip before we plunged in to it. But once we landed and were welcomed with open arms to help this community, I realized how big a difference we were making in the village of Los Fierros.

We spent each day working on the house, but we also took the time to get to know the family that would live in the house, as well as people from the community, and all the children we came to help. We will carry these interactions with us forever, because they changed our perceptions, our way of thinking, and what we are grateful for. We all left a little piece of us in Nicaragua, but we will always have a little piece of Nicaragua wherever we go.

This opportunity not only put things into perspective, but it was also an opportunity for all of us to find fulfillment individually and as a group. I spent seven days with some of the hardest working and most dedicated students I have ever met. I believe that our experience in Nicaragua has inspired all of us to continue making a difference in the world.

Now that we have been back for a couple of weeks and I’ve had a chance to reflect on the experience, I couldn’t imagine not having had the opportunity to participate. When I look back on Nicaragua I think of all the wonderful memories our group was able to develop and the difference we made, but I also see how we came back changed for the better. While many skills are important in the workplace, I believe that empathy is a skill that can help anyone in their life and with whatever career they pursue. Empathy is the force that moves businesses forward, and if we as students can embrace this skill, not only will it set us apart, but it will also strengthen the relationships in our lives.

On behalf of the Lundquist College Honors Program, it was an honor to represent the University of Oregon on this huge accomplishment outside of the country. Go Ducks!

Written by Ana

My name is Ana Pena; I am a 20 year old Junior here at the University of Oregon studying Business Administration with a concentration in Information Systems/Operations Management and a double major in Psychology. I had the privilege of being accepted into the LCB Honors Program last Spring, and it has been one of the best decisions I have made while being at U of O. In addition to school, I am involved in Women in Business and will have the great honor of being President for the upcoming year. Outside of school I enjoy spending time outdoors, creating DIY crafts, and traveling to new places!

Celebrating at the Honors Banquet

The LCB Honors Banquet is a time of celebration, whether it be the senior cohort receiving their cords and preparing for graduation, the junior cohort looking back on their first year, or the newest cohort celebrating their acceptance into the program. Faculty, students, family, and friends were all present for the evening.

The guest speaker was Kimberly N. Ellison-Taylor. She is the Executive Director of Health and Human Services Industry Solutions for Oracle Public Sector. In this capacity, she is responsible for leading Oracle’s Health and Human Services Practice at the federal, state/provincial, and local levels.  She has an impressive work history, as well as a plethora of professional credentials, which were all highlighted during her inspirational speech. She reached out to the Honors Program during her speech, sharing the message that the sky shouldn’t be the limit for us, because we can go above and beyond any goal we set our minds to.

Deb Bauer, the director of the Honors Program, was the MC of the night, along with Tevin Preston, the elected senior speaker for the event. Deb presented a slideshow recapping the recent Alternative Spring Break service project in Costa Rica. Deb also presented the GPA award to Mitch Van Dyke, a member of the senior cohort. In addition, Rachel Bruce was awarded the Leadership Award for her hard work and involvement in and out of the Lundquist College of Business.

The Honors Banquet is a great time for the Junior Cohort, Senior Cohort, and Faculty to look back on the experiences in and out of the program over the past year. The thing that especially stood out to me was the strong bonds that have formed between all of the students within the program. This is an invaluable part of the Honors Program for me. The friendships I have been able to form with students as highly motivated and hardworking as I am, is something I have really enjoyed over the past year, and wouldn’t have been able to receive elsewhere. All of my classmates that were essentially strangers to me at the beginning of the year are now some of my closest friends.

The Lundquist College of Business Honors Program has not only provided me with lifelong friends, but also professional and academic experiences that have helped prepare for the business world. Deb and the rest of the Honors Management Board go above and beyond to arrange site visits, reach out to alumni, and hold networking events that otherwise also would have been out of reach for me.

This first year in the Honors Program has definitely been the most challenging yet, but has also been one of the most rewarding. I can see how much my classmates and I have grown personally and professionally and cannot wait to see what the next year holds for our cohort.

 

– Natalie Millar
Class of 2014

 

 

Written by grimstad@uoregon.edu

Senior Honors Business Student

Honors Program Alternative Break Reflections

The following is a note from Chandler Bryant reflecting on her experience on the Lundquist College of Business Honors Program’s Alternative Break to El Higueron, Costa Rica, at the end of March 2013:

“Often with the fast-paced nature of college, work, and friends, I find it difficult to take a step back and realize how blessed I truly am. Traveling to Costa Rica and building a basketball court within the El Higueron community provided me with this realization. I can genuinely say I have never been physically pushed to my limits like I was while mixing and pouring concrete. But the satisfaction I felt once our team completed the court, and the joy it brought to the community, made it all worth it. Remembering the smiles of the children and adults, laughing and playing with their peers on the court–it is something I will never forget. Many people believed we served the community, which in many ways we did. However, I would say that the community served us far more than we served them. Life moves a little bit slower there, which enables the community to appreciate each other and the smaller aspects of life a little bit more. This is something I often forget to do, and this trip reminded me of the importance of everyday wins. Our trip to El Higueron would not have been possible without the support of the Quest Foundation, Consolidated Supply Co, Delap LLP, and Mr. and Mrs. Harsvik. On behalf of the entire team, I would like to thank you for your donations.”

Written by Brigette

I am a senior in the Lundquist College of Business Honor's Program at the University of Oregon and am finishing up my accounting degree this June 2013. In June I am moving to Portland to work as an Intern for KPMG.

Honors Program Alternative Spring Break to Costa Rica

During Spring Break from March 23-31, 2013, a group of fourteen students from the Lundquist College of Business Honors Program traveled to Costa Rica for an Alternative Break. We teamed up with non-profit Courts for Kids to build a basketball court in El Higueron. Below is a day by day journal of the trip.

Day One

We finally made it! After two plane rides and a bus, we made it to Campo Vida in El Higeuron, Costa Rica. Orlando and his wife, Yselda created Campo Vida from scratch. They received the land from the government and have turned it into a farm and retreat destination. More information on Campo Vida can be found on Campo Vida’s  facebook page . Upon arrival we were served a delicious dinner of rice, beans, meat, and star fruit juice. Orlando and his family are so incredibly nice and some of the most welcoming people I have ever met. I am looking forward to see this place during the day.

Day Two

The community leveled the ground and put a border of cinder blocks around the edge of the court. When we first saw the outline of the court, it was a daunting task, the entire area was dirt with a massive pile of sand right in the middle and multiple piles of rock on the outsides. But we got right to it. Everyone picked up a shovel, bucket, or wheel barrel and starting making concrete. For the most part it was just us working on the court with a few exceptions. We learned Costa Ricans don’t work on Sundays, because it is their resting day. It was Palm Sunday though and during the middle of the day they had a procession through the town. And one man was dressed up like Jesus and came in riding a horse. It was really cool to see and gave us a brief insight into their religious culture. The local Peace Corp Volunteer that set up the entire trip for us, Rachel, said they dressed up the man as Jesus just for us. It was things like this that made us truly feel welcomed into community.

The local women’s group cooked us lunch and it was delicious! For the most part it was rice, beans, meat, and bread. But Rachel asked them to serve us more fruit instead of bread. It was interesting to learn that the locals rarely eat raw fruit. For us it was one of our favorite things!

Day Three

The women’s group did a presentation on their history and what they do. The group was formed four years ago and became nationally recognized 3 years ago. Together they have started to create businesses, such as making popsicles and jams. They are hitting a lot of obstacles however and have not been able to start distributing them yet. They received a grant for a factory and a refrigerated truck, but they need to have certain packaging before they can be sold. In America we see entrepreneurs starting new businesses every day, and it was eye-opening to see how much work and persistence it has taken for this small business to begin. After four years, they are still not quite there yet.

On the court we had a ton of help from the local men and boys, we even had five more Peace Corp Volunteers from around the country come help. We nicknamed a couple of the locals Superman, Hercules, and mini Hercules. They were so incredibly strong and had an incredible work ethic. Costa Rica as a whole is known as being a male dominant society. And it was prevalent while working. It could be seen in the locals interactions with each other and in their interactions with us. We definitely surprised them when we walked up with 12 females and 8 males. But all of us worked right alongside them. By the end of the week a couple of them mentioned that we changed their opinions of Gringos. And on the last two days of work a couple of local girls and women came to help us with the manual labor, which was really cool to see. Because we knew all of us Gringo women working hard inspired them to break society norm and come help out too.

We took a break during the heat of the day and a couple of the locals took us through a pineapple farm to the river. The pineapple farm was incredible with the volcano in the background and they even grabbed a couple pineapples for us to share. At the river we saw an anteater in one of the trees and relaxed in the cool water until we went back to work in the late afternoon.

Day Four

Back to work again! We can see the finish line at this point and the hoops are in place and ready to be put up. During our break today members of the Maieku indigenous tribe came to talk to us about their history and culture. And they brought some of the crafts they sell for us to buy. They made beautiful masks out of balsa wood. They also made hand drums out of iguana skin and beautiful jewelry.

Day Five

We finished the court!!! After countless buckets and sore muscles the court is done! It feels amazing to have it all done. And the town threw a party tonight as a celebration and thank you. The school children performed traditional dances and a man brought his horse to do tricks for us. The horse prayed, walked on its knees, and even brought a girl a flower. They had a band going all night playing traditional music, it was all incredible! The food was amazing and during one of the dances the children pulled us onto the dance floor. It was a great way to finish the court. After that night I forgot all about all the sore muscles.

Day Six

We went zip lining and to the hot springs at the Blue River Resort and Hotel. It was definitely a little different than what we were used to in El Higueron.  We went zip lining through the canopy, then walked on a path right by the Blue River, which is one of the most beautiful things I have ever seen. Then we took a tour through the botanical gardens, went into a natural sauna and had a mud bath, then finished the day relaxing in the hot springs. It was a very relaxing day.

Day Seven

Orlando showed us around Campo Vido taking us through the forest parts and describing the different plants and animals. It is amazing to see pictures of the property before Orlando and his family turned it into Campo Vida. Him and his wife have adopted approximately twenty at risk youth throughout their lives and giving them a place to call home at Campo Vida.

Today is Good Friday, and the community usually has a small procession for Stations of the Cross, but since we are in town they decided to act it out for us. We got to the church and everyone was all dressed up in costume ready to reenact the Stations of the Cross.

Day Eight

This morning we met all the children and community members at the court and played some basketball, volleyball, and soccer with them. Here the pictures say more than I ever could.

Day Nine

We drove to San Jose last night to get ready to depart, so this Easter Sunday we went to a local flea market and did some shopping before flying back for class in the morning.

Quotes from Students

Overall, the trip was incredible, and below are a couple quotes from other students about their experiences.

“My favorite part was giving shoes to the locals who had helped us all week and seeing the kids playing on the court and knowing that we had created something that would have a lasting impact on the community.” -Natalie Millar

“The big takeaways for me are that we are lucky to have everything that we do and other people around the world need opportunities as well. This trip was a great way to give back.” – Aaron McGinley

“I think the thing that resonated with me most powerfully is that people have the capacity to surprise each other in a positive way. Our group members surprised ourselves and each other with how hard we were able to work, the locals were pleasantly surprised by our ethic, and our eyes were opened to the warmth and generosity of the community there. I’ve always believed that people are inherently good, and this trip strongly reaffirmed that in ways I didn’t expect.” -Rachel Bruce

“Being in the small, rural community of El Higueron really showed me how kind hearted and welcoming people can truly be. They showed me the joy that can come from putting an emphasis on family and relationships, something that can be all to easily forgotten in our fast paced lifestyles.” – Amber Hull

“It was an incredible experience, I felt not only welcomed into the community but into their families. And all the hard work and sore muscles disappeared as soon as I saw the smiles on all the kids faces.” – Bridgette

 

Written by Brigette

I am a senior in the Lundquist College of Business Honor's Program at the University of Oregon and am finishing up my accounting degree this June 2013. In June I am moving to Portland to work as an Intern for KPMG.