Honors Program

2017 Honors Program Spring Banquet

On May 15, the Lundquist College of Business Honors Program hosted its 19th annual spring banquet at the Ford Alumni Center. Students, their families, and faculty members gathered together to celebrate and recognize the 2015-2017 cohort and their completion of the Honors Program curriculum and resulting graduation from the program.

Keynote speaker Jonathan Evans began the evening by sharing his experiences as co-founder and CEO of Skyward IO, a Verizon company. Skyward is a revolutionary drone operations company that Evans started during his time in the Oregon MBA program in 2012. Since then, Skyward has grown tremendously and recently merged with Verizon. Evans shared inspiring stories from his company as well as important lessons that he learned through his business experience. As Evans discussed making it through Skyward’s most challenging years, he emphasized the importance of persevering and maintaining core values. By sharing his story, Evans hoped to spark students’ curiosity to explore new things—after all, that’s how Skyward began years ago.

Sahar Petri, the 2016 Leadership Award recipient, announced two award winners. First, Julie Meunier of the 2016-2018 cohort received the 2017 Leadership Award. Meunier is highly involved in the Lundquist College of Business, notably working as a Duck Guide and as a member of the Oregon Consulting Group. Next, Doug Wilson was recognized as the recipient of the 2017 Faculty Award. Wilson taught the honors capstone course, BA 453H, in which teams of students worked on projects with the City of Albany.

Next, Amanda Gonzales led a look back on the 2017 Honors Program alternative break trip to Guatemala. Gonzales took time to thank the generous sponsors, donors, and all of the other individuals who made it possible for 11 students to travel with Where There Be Dragons, an experiential learning organization, this past spring break.

Honors Program director Deb Bauer followed Gonzales to present the final award of the night, the 2017 Student Achievement Award. This award is given to the graduating member with the highest GPA. This year’s recipient was Jack Miller. Bauer also recognized members of the student management board for their hard work and contribution to the program’s success this past year.

Graduating senior Ben Tesluk ended the night with a speech reflecting on the 2015-2017 cohort’s time in the Honors Program. He emphasized his appreciation for his cohort, whose members are now close friends, and for the opportunities the program provided. Tesluk also thanked Bauer for her enormous contributions to the program over the years, as she is finishing her final year as program director. Bauer received a standing ovation from banquet attendees as Tesluk presented her with a thank you gift from the graduating class.

The evening was full of inspiration and recognition of notable people involved in the Honors Program. The banquet marked 35 students’ successful completion of the program, a significant challenge and honor worthy of celebration.

Story by Carolyn Graeper ’18. Graeper is a business administration major with a minor in art. She will spend this summer working before traveling to Denmark to participate in a fall semester exchange program at Copenhagen Business School. Graeper will graduate in spring 2018.

Written by UO Business

The UO Lundquist College of Business empowers an engaged community of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders who create, apply, and disseminate knowledge that contributes significantly to their professions, communities, and society. The college delivers a dynamic learning environment where world-class professors engage and get to know students, where students work on real projects for real companies, and where alumni go on to high-powered jobs worldwide.

2017 Honors Program Spring Site Visit to Nike

In May, members of the Lundquist College of Business Honors Program were invited to Nike World Headquarters in Beaverton, Oregon for a campus tour and panel discussion with long-time Nike employees.

The tour included visits to numerous buildings dedicated to the different departments that make up the Nike brand. Some notable buildings included the Michael Jordan building and Prefontaine Hall. It was amusing to hear about Nike’s humble beginnings making sales out of the back of a van in Eugene. The storytellersmdash;as Nike fondly calls their guides—gave students insight into how the campus and numerous intramural clubs, courts, fields, and gardens all contribute to Nike’s incredible business culture. The stories of sports legends like Mia Hamm and Jerry Rice demonstrated Nike’s culture of treating its sponsored athletes as part of the team.

Students explored the many food options available during their lunch break, during which they shared what they had enjoyed most about the tour and what they had learned about Nike’s history. Nike’s cafeteria space provides employees with a place to come together and interact over lunch, creating an exciting and vibrant atmosphere.

After lunch, students attended a panel discussion comprised of Nike employees, the majority of whom were part of the golf division. The panelists included Aaron Heiser, David Pearce, Collette Hemmings, Jarod Courtney, and moderator Heather Broderick. Each panelist shared the story of their career paths and the challenges that they faced along the way. Many of the panelists had experienced career journeys best described as nomadic, experiencing Nike’s global reach by landing positions in the U.K., Europe, and Asia. Another aspect of Nike life the group discussed was how interconnected the business culture is to their everyday activities.

Each panelist discussed the Nike company value that spoke to them most and that they keep in the back of their mind to help guide their way through decisions and challenges. During the Q&A portion, the panelists were candidly open and honest about their experiences. From the closure of the golf equipment sector to the struggles of following your career in unfamiliar places, their stories resonated with students on both a mental and emotional level.

To conclude the day, Honors Program students received access to the Nike company store, where they had the opportunity to purchase merchandise and further mingle with their peers. All students left full of insightmdash;many left with bags full of Nike gear as well.

Story by Liam Jacobs and Nick Miller, 2016-2018 Honors Program cohort members. Jacobs is a business administration major, concentrating in sports business with a minor in economics. He will spend this next school year as a marketing and promotions intern for UO Athletics, and graduates in spring ‘18. Miller is a business administration major with a concentration in finance. He is also pursuing a second major in economics. This summer he will hold a position as a summer analyst at Ascent Private Capital Management, a subsidiary of U.S. Bank, in San Francisco. Miller will graduate in spring ‘19.

Written by UO Business

The UO Lundquist College of Business empowers an engaged community of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders who create, apply, and disseminate knowledge that contributes significantly to their professions, communities, and society. The college delivers a dynamic learning environment where world-class professors engage and get to know students, where students work on real projects for real companies, and where alumni go on to high-powered jobs worldwide.

Honors Students Travel to Guatemala

The Lundquist College Business Honors Program took its sixth annual alternative break trip to Guatemala during the week of spring break in late March 2017. The program partnered with Where There be Dragons, an experiential learning-based organization, to expose students to cross-cultural education, global citizenship, and opportunities for individual growth. Eleven students from the program—led by Honors Program director, Deb Bauer—participated in the trip and engaged in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

The group travelled to Antigua, a UNESCO world heritage site, as well as various communities around Lake Atítlan, where the group was able to experience local Guatemalan culture. For four nights of the trip, students stayed with host families in San Lucas Toliman. Living with host families proved to be a very challenging, but also a rewarding experience for all. Many students didn’t speak Spanish, but learned to communicate in other ways and made meaningful connections with their host families by cooking together, playing games with their host siblings, or spending time together in the evenings.

The group spent their days visiting various organizations and individuals in the community where they learned about traditional Mayan culture, Guatemalan history, sustainable agriculture practices, and the current social, political, and economic challenges that the people of Guatemala are facing.

The group spent a number of days with the Mesoamerican Permaculture Institute (IMAP), a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching local Guatemalans how to incorporate sustainable agricultural practices and traditional Mayan agriculture techniques into their daily lives. IMAP serves communities around Lake Atitlan and is dedicated to promoting food sovereignty, community development, and the preservation of local biodiversity and ancestral knowledge. With IMAP, the group learned about Mayan cosmovision and engaged in hands-on projects, including introducing new plants into a community garden.

Overall, the trip was a great success, allowing students to interact with local Guatemalans and learn about a new culture. Expanding our knowledge of the world around us is an invaluable lesson that the future business leaders in the Honors Program were able to experience.

Story by Amanda Gonzales ’17. Gonzales is an accounting major minoring in Spanish. She will spend this summer working as an audit intern with Deloitte in their Portland office. Gonzales will graduate in the fall of 2017.

Written by UO Business

The UO Lundquist College of Business empowers an engaged community of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders who create, apply, and disseminate knowledge that contributes significantly to their professions, communities, and society. The college delivers a dynamic learning environment where world-class professors engage and get to know students, where students work on real projects for real companies, and where alumni go on to high-powered jobs worldwide.

2017 Honors Program Winter Site Visits

During winter term, the Lundquist College of Business Honors Program was fortunate enough to visit two wealth management firms in Portland, Oregon. Joining two other student groups—the UO Investment Group and the UO Financial Management Association—Honors Program members spoke with executives from Ferguson Wellman and Arnerich Massena to learn the ins and outs of what each company has to offer and the culture of each firm.

The first stop was Ferguson Wellman, located in the heart of downtown Portland. Students had the privilege of hearing from two executive vice presidents and UO alumni: Ralph Cole, executive vice president of research; and Josh Frankel, executive vice president for West Bearing Investments. Both discussed how the nature of their careers allow them to develop long, rewarding relationships with their clients. Cole and Frankel also gave great advice on how to reach dream careers by getting involved on campus and not being afraid to reach out for help.

Later in the day students headed over to the largest private wealth management company in the state of Oregon: Arnerich Massena. They were greeted by three staff members—Ryland Moore, Mr. Christopher Van Dyke, and Mr. Matt Bryant—who expressed their love for the company and conducted a question and answer discussion. Much of the company’s success is due to its strong values of always doing what is best for the customer and investing in firms that have the potential to not only yield economic success but also help the world around them.

All in all, the site visit attendees had a great time learning more about the financial industry and meeting incredible people who are so willing to help students on their journey to find their dream career.

Story by Arianna Shapiro ’18. Shapiro is an accounting and economics double major. She will spend the summer in Tel Aviv, Israel, participating in a data analysis internship program for a start-up company. She will also participate in a number of accounting summer leadership programs. Shapiro will graduate in spring 2018.

Written by UO Business

The UO Lundquist College of Business empowers an engaged community of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders who create, apply, and disseminate knowledge that contributes significantly to their professions, communities, and society. The college delivers a dynamic learning environment where world-class professors engage and get to know students, where students work on real projects for real companies, and where alumni go on to high-powered jobs worldwide.

2017 Honors Alumni Networking Event

In January, the Lundquist College of Business Honors Program held its annual alumni networking event at the Portland White Stag building. This event offered students the opportunity to network in a professional environment, alumni the chance to reconnect with old colleagues and meet current Honors Program students, and a chance for everyone to see how the Honors Program is growing and developing.

This year the alumni networking event had five program alumni panelists: Corinne McWilliams, senior global demand planner at Nike; Ryan Dingler, digital product manager at Visa; Justin Christiansen, general manager for the Internet of Things market and channel sales at Intel; Ben Estes, product marketing manager at Apple; and Annie Klug, director of community programs for the Portland Trail Blazers. These individuals shared their experiences, reflected on their time at the Lundquist College and in the Honors Program, and provided insight to life post-graduation. The recurring theme of the discussion focused on the indirect paths each took to get to their current careers.

New Lundquist College of Business Dean Sarah Nutter was also in attendance. She spoke about her excitement to join the Lundquist College of Business, to work with faculty, staff, and students, and to continually improve both individual programs and the college as a whole.

The event was a successful night of opportunities for students to gain insight on defining their career goals and discovering how the Honors Program can help them achieve those goals. Connecting with the students that have come before us and are now Honors Program alumni gives students a solid foundation of support, inspiration, and motivation.

Story by Jessica Goss. Goss is a business administration major and economics minor. Goss is a member of the Oregon Consulting Group and will be graduating spring 2018.

Written by UO Business

The UO Lundquist College of Business empowers an engaged community of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders who create, apply, and disseminate knowledge that contributes significantly to their professions, communities, and society. The college delivers a dynamic learning environment where world-class professors engage and get to know students, where students work on real projects for real companies, and where alumni go on to high-powered jobs worldwide.

2017 Honors Program Fall Site Visits

On the chilly morning of November 4, a group of ten honors students piled into carpools and headed south for the first site visit of the 2016-2017 academic year. The first stop was Cottage Grove, Oregon to visit Aprovecho, a non-profit organization with a mission of “living, learning, organizing, and educating to inspire a sustainable culture.” While there students toured the heart of the 40-acre grounds with the center’s permaculture program director and land steward, Abel Kloster. The group visited and learned about the meaning of the gardens, orchards, water catchment systems, homes, classrooms, and strawbale dormitory. Aprovecho hosts programs related to permaculture, building and design, green technologies, and community education. The visit was a fun experience for students to learn about non-profit business as well as witness the collaboration between business and community.

The second stop was Hop Valley Brewing, located near downtown Eugene. While touring the facility, students learned about the day-to-day operations of the entire brewing operation. The tour included weaving through giant tanks, hoses, and conveyor belts to experience the creation process from hop to bottle. Additionally, Hop Valley’s acquisition by MillerCoors was a point of interest that students asked questions about. Following the tour the group claimed a table in the tasting room and shared a large lunch while discussing the day’s events.

The day started on a cold, but beautiful mountain and ended in a cozy brewhouse. Students were exposed to a meaningful non-profit, learned about supply chain operations, and had the opportunity to engage with amazing local businesspeople and their peers. The honors site visits are not just about questions and tours—they’re about the people who make communities thrive and inspire everyone to succeed.

Joslyn Bryant is currently a sophomore double majoring in business administration and romance languages and minoring in food studies. She studied abroad her freshman year in Italy, and plans to study abroad again this summer in Greece in a food studies program. Bryant will graduate in spring 2019.

Written by UO Business

The UO Lundquist College of Business empowers an engaged community of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders who create, apply, and disseminate knowledge that contributes significantly to their professions, communities, and society. The college delivers a dynamic learning environment where world-class professors engage and get to know students, where students work on real projects for real companies, and where alumni go on to high-powered jobs worldwide.

Honors Program Nike Site Visit

Members of the Lundquist College of Business Honors Program had the chance to tour the Nike World Headquarters and hear from a panel of highly experienced employees. Beyond learning about the heritage of the world’s premiere athletic apparel company, students saw firsthand what it means to make a career out of your passions.

The day began with a tour of the Nike Campus, led by Dana Reams of Nike Golf. On the tour students learned the rich history of the company’s humble beginnings, which involved selling shoes out of the trunk of a car mere minutes away from where the Lillis Business Complex stands today. While sharing with us how Nike became the world’s premier athletic apparel and supply company, Reams instilled an important lesson: never lose sight of who you are. For the honors students on the trip, this meant varying things; however, for Nike it means never losing sight of the innovation instilled in Phil Knight, the dedication of Steve Prefontaine, and the unrelenting drive and loyalty of Coach Bill Bowerman.

During the panel discussion at the end of the day, students heard from Heather Broderick, Jane Moss, David Pearce, and Amy Bartlett. Each panelist shared a very different story of their journey from childhood to Nike. Some took the “traditional path,” while others spent a stint as a bartender or self-proclaimed ski bum. These varying experiences led to distinct advice and core values from each. The one thing they all had in common is that each took something about which they were particularly passionate and found a way to turn it into a career.

One of the most resounding pieces of advice was “listen to your athlete.” Moss and Barlett explained that if you are “listening to your athlete,” simple comments, such as “I wish I could wear these shoes on the golf course” or “These are my favorite shorts,” can lead to revolutions in the industry and carry the athlete to victory.

Although the student audience members were not in a position to listen to comments from Tiger Woods or Maria Sharapova and create a multimillion-dollar product, many of them will likely be in the position in the future where they can either choose to follow the status quo or choose to innovate. The advice given by the panelists will undoubtedly linger in the minds of the students on the trip.

Beyond stories and lessons from the panelists, the site visit proved particularly significant for the members of the Business Honors Program. For the newly admitted 2016-2018 cohort, this was one of the first opportunities to meet and get to know one another. At the same time, the visit served as the last official Honors Program event for the graduating seniors in the upper cohort. Memories from this visit are sure to stick with everyone who took part in the trip.

Story by TJ Reardon ’17. Reardon is an accounting major minoring in economics. He will be spending this summer interning as a core assurance intern with PwC at their Portland office. Reardon will be graduating in the winter of 2017.

Written by UO Business

The UO Lundquist College of Business empowers an engaged community of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders who create, apply, and disseminate knowledge that contributes significantly to their professions, communities, and society. The college delivers a dynamic learning environment where world-class professors engage and get to know students, where students work on real projects for real companies, and where alumni go on to high-powered jobs worldwide.

Honors Program Banquet

At the end of May, the Lundquist College of Business Honors Program held their annual banquet to acknowledge the achievements of the graduating members. Students and families in attendance celebrated and reflected upon all the accomplishments of the 2014-2016 cohort.

Scott Allan was the keynote speaker for the banquet. He split his speech up into three stories: his personal story; his experiences at Hydro Flask; and what he called “everyone else’s story.” Allan’s own background included the challenges and hardships that molded him into a successful executive, and how he went from working in high tech in California to a consumer goods company in central Oregon. Anecdotes from his time at Hydro Flask reflected on what it takes to maintain excellent company culture and how to recruit the right employees. Scott ended his inspiring speech by telling honors students to keep an open mind as they created their own story and to enjoy the ride that comes along with working in business.

Deb Bauer, the college’s Honors Program director, expressed her gratitude for the students graduating, the hard work they’ve put in over the past two years, and how they all have incredibly bright futures. Bauer also gave out two awards. The first was the Academic Achievement Award, which was given to senior Katie Wight. Following Wight’s recognition was junior Sahar Petri, who received the Leadership Award.

Mike Holland rounded out the three student speeches with a presentation that was equally funny, heartwarming, and informative. He discussed the friendships that he made while in the program and the challenges of taking classes with 34 other motivated students–all while going through an entertaining slideshow of past memories.

The event was certainly a night to remember. There was much appreciation for Scott Allan, Deb Bauer, the students, and the comedy show that was Mike Holland’s senior speech. This year’s banquet demonstrated the significance of the Business Honors Program and the high level of success of its students.

Story by Joe Hiefield ’17. Hiefield is a junior studying business administration with a concentration in finance and a minor in economics. He serves on the University of Oregon Investment Group management team and will be interning in Seattle with Meridian Capital Group. Hiefield will be graduating in spring 2017.

Written by UO Business

The UO Lundquist College of Business empowers an engaged community of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders who create, apply, and disseminate knowledge that contributes significantly to their professions, communities, and society. The college delivers a dynamic learning environment where world-class professors engage and get to know students, where students work on real projects for real companies, and where alumni go on to high-powered jobs worldwide.

Honors Program Winter Site Visits

Business honors students had no idea what was in store when they signed up for the program’s winter term site visits. Some had never heard of either of the companies aside from a quick googling the night before. But the two site visits ended up being more intriguing and interactive than many could have imagined.

The first stop was Arcimoto, an electric car startup in Eugene. The company’s hip and exuberant president told the history of the company and that it was based on the idea that human travel can be vastly improved as far as efficiency and carbon impact go. This premise led the company to design a two-person vehicle based on a motorcycle style 1+1 platform that is steered via handle bars. With a full roll cage, it offers far more protection than a motorcycle in addition to the extra wheel in front for stability. Weighing in at less than 1000 pounds, the fully electric vehicle brings efficiency to travel at a degree the market has yet to see. Arcimoto has already developed multiple functioning vehicles and is now in the stages of ramping up production after a successful marketing trip up and down the West Coast, which landed it a large number of orders.

The second company honors students visited that day was Attune Foods, LLC. This company provided a counterpoint in terms of size and capacity compared with Arcimoto. Attune produces different granola and nut mixes for a large variety of retailers and brands. Site managers gave students a tour of the production plant, showing them the entire process of turning raw materials into packaged and finished products ready for shipment.

The company’s maximized use of space and automation would have made even the most rigorous operations and business analytics professors proud. Students saw how workers change over assembly lines for different product runs and how the company forecasts demand to ensure it has the right amount of product at the right time. Everyone especially enjoyed sampling freshly baked granola straight from the oven on its way to the packaging machine.

Altogether, both site visits exposed students to a sampling of the many different types of businesses in the Eugene community, and demonstrated how each of them fulfills its own niche in the market. These visits are a great part of the Business Honors Program, providing wonderful opportunities to diversify knowledge while putting lessons learned in the classroom into real-world context.

Story by Kennedy Salveter, ’17. Salveter is a junior studying accounting. He currently is a resident assistant in the Business Residence Community in Earl Hall and a member of the UO Triathlon Team. Salveter will be graduating in spring 2017.

Written by UO Business

The UO Lundquist College of Business empowers an engaged community of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders who create, apply, and disseminate knowledge that contributes significantly to their professions, communities, and society. The college delivers a dynamic learning environment where world-class professors engage and get to know students, where students work on real projects for real companies, and where alumni go on to high-powered jobs worldwide.

2016 Honors Alumni Networking Event

The Business Honors Program Alumni Networking Event was an amazing experience for students looking to gain insight into potential careers. The evening featured plenty of opportunities for in-person networking with professionals, as well as a panel discussion. Students gained insight into a variety of different experiences and received advice both by conversing with alumni and from the panelists. Meeting with alumni was also incredibly powerful because some of them were just recently students.

While for some it was at first nerve-wracking to be surrounded by professionals who could potentially be future coworkers, the conversations were beneficial to directing students’ future plans and goals. Students interested in careers in accounting, for example, were able to hear from alumni currently working for accounting firms, ask them questions, and hear about their experiences.

The panel discussions offered additional insights into others’ journeys. Students learned how Business Honors Program alumni ended up where they are today—whether it be via multiple career changes or by staying in the same location. Panelists also shared why and how they benefited from the experiences they had in the honors program.

Overall, it was a great event for making connections with many former honors students while interacting with other business professionals in a formal dinner setting.

Story by Kaela Libby ’17. Libby is an accounting major with a minor in economics. In summer 2016, she will continue taking courses on campus in addition to participating in a number of accounting summer leadership programs. Libby will graduate in spring 2017.

Written by UO Business

The UO Lundquist College of Business empowers an engaged community of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders who create, apply, and disseminate knowledge that contributes significantly to their professions, communities, and society. The college delivers a dynamic learning environment where world-class professors engage and get to know students, where students work on real projects for real companies, and where alumni go on to high-powered jobs worldwide.