Category: Collections

New Finding Aid | Dan Powell Photographs

Special Collections and University Archives is pleased to announce a newly updated finding aid for the Dan Powell photograph collection (PH297) now published on Archives West. This collection consists of constructed imagery and large format photographic prints taken by Powell between 1978 and 2012. Many of his works are also available to view online in the Dan Powell digital collection in Oregon Digital.

Dan Powell, “North of Alvord Desert,” 1989. PH297 Special Collections & University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, OR.

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New Finding Aids

We are pleased to announce newly updated finding aids now available on Archives West for the following collections:

Louis Conrad Rosenberg collection, circa 1900-1970 (Ax 509)

Collection comprises papers of American etcher and architect Louis Conrad Rosenberg, and includes matted etchings, dry points, watercolors, journals, catalogs, architectural renderings, awards, books from his personal library, and information from interviews.

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Collection Highlight | Oregon Women’s Political History Collection

 

Political poster that reads "Win with Women"
Political poster, Oregon Women’s Political Caucus Records, Coll 369, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon

In honor of Women’s History Month, Special Collections and University Archives is highlighting the Oregon Women’s Political History Collection.

The Oregon Women’s Political History Collection comprises over a dozen individual manuscript collections. These collections constitute over 200 linear feet of manuscript material and represent women’s political and activist work in Oregon in the latter half of the twentieth century.  The collection was started in the 1990s as a collaborative collection development effort among UO Libraries, the Center for the Study of Women in Society (CSWS), and the Friends of the Oregon Women’s Political History Collection.

The collections include:

  •  Anderson, Jean Fuller Papers (Coll 312) 1978-1990, Finding aid
  • Davis, Eleanor Papers (Coll 351) 1963-1989  Finding aid
  • Dost, Jeanne Papers (Coll 366) 1972-1988  Finding aid
  • Dunn, Nancy Papers (Coll 362) 1986-1990  Finding aid
  • Eugene Women’s Crisis Center Records (Coll 313) 1977-1991  Finding aid
  • Fadeley, Nancy Papers (Coll 349) 1971-1989  Finding aid
  • Frye, Helen Papers (Coll 348) 1971-2011  Finding aid
  • Hendriksen, Margie Papers (Coll 365) 1971-1992  Finding aid
  • Kafoury, Gretchen Papers (Coll 353) 1971-1983  Finding aid
  • Milligan, Marian Papers (Coll 370) 1974-1983  Finding aid
  • Novick, Jane Papers (Coll 368) 1968-1990  Finding aid
  • Oregon Now Records (Coll 371) 1971-2006  Finding aid
  • Oregon Women’s Political Caucus Records (Coll 369) 1971-1999  Finding aid
  • Ryles, Nancy Papers (Coll 364) 1972-1990  Finding aid

Political pamphlet that says "We have a lot to win"Pol,tical button that says "I'm pro-choice and I vote"The activist women represented in these collections worked to increase women’s political engagement in Oregon and empower women to fully participate in elective politics and government agencies at the local, county, and state levels. The story of women’s political work in Oregon in the mid-to-late twentieth century has not been fully told; these primary documents–the sources necessary for the writing of history–are essential to that process. Through support by LSTA funding administered by the Oregon State Library, grant project staff were able to process, catalog, and publish finding aids for these collections and provide access to these collections.

Researchers can find out more about related SCUA collections documenting Women, Gender, and Sexuality in our research guides.

Processing the Quincy Scott Political Cartoons

Special Collections and University Archives is currently processing and writing a finding aid for the Quincy Scott collection of twentieth century political cartoons (GA Sc 85). This project was generously supported through an LSTA grant and will also include digitization of a selection of cartoons through the assistance of UO Libraries’ Digital Scholarship Services. This archival and digital collection will provide access to Oregonian political and social perspectives during the Great Depression and World War II through the humor and wit of political caricature. A future blog post will announce when the collection is fully processed and available to the public.

Quincy Scott for The Oregonian, “Has he bitten off more than he can chew?,” 1934 June 24. GA Sc 85. Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.

Portland resident Quincy Scott (1882-1965) was the editorial cartoonist for The Oregonian from 1931-1949 and this collection includes original artwork produced during his tenure at the newspaper, comprised of over 4,600 almost daily political cartoons. Scott was a faithful member of the Republican Party and his cartoons strongly reflect his personal stance on local, national, and international political topics, though Scott’s son/biographer notes that these opinions did not always fully align with those of the newspaper’s general editorial team. These cartoons illustrate early twentieth century life and politics in Oregon and will be particularly of interest to those researching the history of critical or conservative receptions of Depression-era legislation. Some of Scott’s frequently illustrated subjects will be highlighted in this post.

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New Acquisition: Collection of Medieval Paleography and Illumination Specimens

Special Collections and University Archives has added to its collections a packet of ten individual manuscript leaves useful for the teaching of medieval manuscript writing and illumination of Western Europe from the 13th to 15th century.

The set represents a variety of scribal hand styles, levels of decoration, and time periods in manuscript codex production including the late Middle Ages and early Renaissance. Over this span of time, manuscript production became increasingly secularized as books came to be created and bound outside of the monastic scriptoria in Europe and available to the laity. The specimen leaves are exclusively works on parchment, but they vary in dimension, layout, and genre, including choirbooks, devotionals, and contemporary Medieval writing. Most are written in Latin, but vernacular works are also represented, including a Dutch Book of Hours. Continue reading