American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing sponsored Talk

On Thursday, January 28th the University of Oregon chapter of the American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) sponsored a speaker as part of the Geography Departments weekly speaker series. Scott Anderson, a hydrologist from the USGS at the Washington Water Science Center gave a talk entitled Monitoring the fluvial erosion and downstream impacts of a large sediment slug using repeat SfM photogrammetry and real-time sediment gaging. The talk focused on the channel response to the Oso landslide in Washington and used areal structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry as part of the analysis. After the talk, active members of ASPRS took Scott to dinner for further discussion of the benefits of SfM based geomorphic change detection and life beyond school.

New articles on remote sensing and rivers in the journal Geomorphology

This year’s newest river rat Devin Lea has had a pair of articles published in the journal Geomorphology in the past few months. The first article, titled Mapping spatial patterns of stream power and channel change along a gravel-bed river in northern Yellowstone highlights Devin’s Master’s work from the University of Wyoming with advisor Carl Legleiter. The article was part of a special issue (Volume 252) dedicated to the career of William Graf. Many articles in the issue were presented as a series of sessions at the 2014 annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers in Tampa, Florida, which was co-organized by Mark Fonstad and Bruce Rhoads at the University of Illinois. Devin paired again with Carl Legleiter to author the second article titled Refining measurements of lateral channel movement from image time series by quantifying spatial variations in registration error. The paper builds on quantifying error as done by past UO grad student Michael Hughes (et al., 2006) to provide a framework for calculating spatially varying error for images based on their ground control points. The paper can be found in Volume 258, and links to both papers through Geomorphology are provided below:

Mapping spatial patterns of stream power and channel change along a gravel-bed river in northern Yellowstone

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169555X15300155

Refining measurements of lateral channel movement from image time series by quantifying spatial variations in registration error

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169555X16300101

Winter Field Work on the Long Tom River

Over the winter, Christina Appleby returned to her field sites on the lower Long Tom River near Monroe, OR. Her goal was to visit her sites during higher flood flows. She surveyed multiple water surface elevations along that she will use to calibrate a 2D HEC-RAS model of the region.

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Monroe Drop Structure – Summer low flow (left), Winter high flow (right)

 

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Historic meander bends during Winter high flow