Traditional Artist Spotlight: Kelly and Eraina Palmer

Kelli and Eraina Palmer are enrolled members of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. Kelli began to learn basket weaving from her mother Eraina about 12 years ago. Kelli started with Wapus sally bags, a traditional style for root gathering and food storage. She later moved to cornhusk basketry with false embroidery.

The term “false embroidery” refers to a decorative surface treatment in basketry design. This technique is used to decorate twined baskets in which an additional colored weft element is incorporated into the twining. These “embroidered” designs are only visible on the surface of the object.

Like most traditional artists, Eraina and Kelli mix older traditions with innovative techniques and materials in their basketry, which are now used for decorative purposes as well as functional. They teach anyone who wants to learn these skills, especially to Native American women who have children and will pass their knowledge to future generations.

Kelli Palmer also participated in the 2012-13 Traditional Artist Apprenticehip Program as a master artist, one who passes his or her traditional skills and knowledge along to one or more apprentices.

An exhibit of the Palmers’ work, along with that of Kelli’s apprentice, Joy Ramirez, is on display at the Museum of Natural and Cultural History (MNCH) in Eugene. The show is up until May 2014.

If you are interested in the Traditional Artists Apprenticeship Program, or know of someone who is, please contact
Emily Afanador at 541-346-3820
or email the OFN at: ofn@uoregon.edu.

OFN at the American Folklore Society 2013 Annual Meeting

by Riki Saltzman

I had the privilege of representing OFN at the American Folklore Society annual meeting this year. My primary task was to speak about how OFN is involved with teaching at the University of Oregon. My colleagues also spoke about their teaching roles and responsibilities.

The main takeaway from this very lively session (lots of audience members, including our own John Fenn) was that public folklore programs based at universities are engaged in a wide range of teaching—from outright classes (Indiana Folklore at IU) to interns (Kentucky Folklife Program, OFN, Traditional Arts Indiana, Missouri Folklife Program) and graduate assistants (KFP, MFP, OFN). We at OFN also have the opportunity to participate as practicum hosts for AAD students (Karen Agocs, MA ‘13/Arts in the Parks), while students at IU create one-panel exhibits that go on to be part of TAI’s touring exhibit program.

Teaching also means involving students in the nuts and bolts of what we at public folklore programs do—from learning about advocacy by writing letters to legislators (MFP), to planning and implementing the Indiana Governor’s Arts Awards (TAI), and working with local festivals to learn about stage management, running sound, and facilitating narrative stage discussions (KFP). Other venues that provide opportunities for students include working with park rangers, local libraries, and state fairs for such diverse projects as fiddle contests, century farm and ranch awards, or documenting and exhibiting local baskets and basket makers.

As always, AFS provides a smorgasbord of new ideas—more on those as they find their way into OFN’s future projects!

Native American Heritage Month Events

Hallie Ford Art Museum of Art

In conjunction with the Native American Heritage Month in November, the Hallie Ford Museum of Art is pleased to highlight newly commissioned artworks and collaborative opportunities as well as its continuing commitment to showcase, preserve, and honor the works, traditions, and culture of the Native American community through the museum’s permanent collection and gallery installations.

Activities during the month will include the opening of the “Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts Biennial,” the dedication of a newly commissioned work by Joe Feddersen as well as a demonstration by the artist, the opportunity to donate a blanket to Marie Watt’s sculpture project, and a new online archive of the museum’s Native American basket collection.

Froelick Gallery
November 5 – December 14, 2013

“Bird Wings” by Rick Bartow

Internationally recognized for his prolific output in numerous media, this new body of work by Rick Bartow consists of several small acrylic and gouache paintings alongside large pastel drawings. His subjects are coyotes, crows, kestrels and hawks as well as human forms- these figures seem to be knowing guides or searchers dazzled by strange dreams and visitations from spirits. Exacting rendering and sparse outline meet in fields of bold color; eyes, teeth, wings, faces and cryptic symbols emerge from clouds of active marks in these masterful and haunting compositions.
http://www.froelickgallery.com/Exhibit_Detail.cfm?ShowsID=215

Notable Upcoming Exhibits:

The Art Gym
January 13 – February 12, 2014

“I.M.N.D.N – Native Art for the 21st Century”

http://www.marylhurst.edu/arts-and-events/art-gym/art-gym-exhibitions/upcoming-exhibitions.html

Museum of Contemporary Craft
January 31 – April 19, 2014

“This is Not a Silent Movie – Four Contemporary Alaska Native Artists”

http://mocc.pnca.edu/exhibitions/6765

A Few Words For Chris D’Arcy, Executive Director, Oregon Arts Commission and Oregon Cultural Trust

After 19 years of leadership, Chris D’Arcy recently announced her departure from the Oregon Arts Commission and the Cultural Trust. She is, in her words, “moving on to new and different things.”

For those unaware of Chris’s contributions to Arts and Culture in Oregon, some highlights include “the Arts Commission’s Arts Build Communities program, which shined a light on the incredible grassroots cultural activity that takes place in every corner of Oregon. That program paved the way for Oregon’s cultural, business and community leaders to dream about new funding for culture – and the Cultural Task Force, . . . [which led to the] Oregon Cultural Trust – considered one of the most productive outcomes of the 1999 and 2001 legislative sessions. The Trust is now a national model of innovation, collaboration and engagement around culture.”

Chris D’arcy’s contributions to Oregon’s arts, culture, tourism, and economic development have been incalculable, and her regional and national impact have been immense. Her strong, creative and imaginative leadership has given her capable and talented staff the space in which to flourish and thrive.

All of us at OFN wish Chris the very best in her next steps.

Traditional Artist Spotlight: Alex Llumiquinga Perez

Alex Llumiquinga Perez is a talented musician originally from Ecuador. Perez’s first teacher and inspiration was his grandfather, who played traditional Andean music. As a child, Perez learned not only his grandfather’s tunes but also those of popular Andean folk groups. Perez later joined the traditional group Chayag, and toured internationally. In 2001, Perez immigrated to Oregon and joined his wife in her home state of Oregon. Perez is well known in Lincoln County where he participates in many local events and benefit programs. In addition to playing music, Perez also makes traditional Andean instruments such as the charango (a 10 stringed guitar) and samponas (a type of pan flute).

Click here to watch Alex Llumiquinga Perez craft a charango and quena (a type of flute).

OFN exhibit “Rooted in Tradition”

The Oregon Folklife Network’s exhibit “Rooted in Tradition” showcases the variety of OFN’s partnerships and productions at the University of Oregon around the state and at our hub, University of Oregon. The exhibit was developed in collaboration with the UO’s Library Diversity Committee and Library Exhibits Program. “Rooted in Traditon” is on display on the first floor of the Knight Library.

There will be an exhibit reception on Wednesday, October 30, 2013 from 4 – 5:30 in the
Knight Library’s Browsing Room.
All are welcome!

New Staff

Bruno Seraphin is a first-year master’s student in the University of Oregon’s Folklore Studies program. He has an undergraduate degree from New York University with a background in narrative and documentary film production. He just moved from North Carolina and is thrilled to be living on the West Coast and getting to know Oregon communities.

Traditional Artist Spotlight: Maria de Jesus Gonzales Laguna

Maria de Jesus Gonzales Laguna was born in Guanajuato, Mexico in 1969. Gonzales Laguna became interested in Mexican Folklore through her adolescent experiences of rural and city lifeways. In 1992 Gonzales Laguna received a Fine Arts degree from the Casa de la Cultra de Celaya, got married, and moved to the United States.

Gonzales Laguna’s passion for Mexican Folklore has been teaching her family and others who have either moved away from Mexico or  are of Mexican heritage. Gonzales Laguna provides the geographic, historical, and cultural context of each region in Mexico while teaching traditional clothing techniques, music, and dance styles. She and her students perform for individuals for Latino communities and also invite people from other cultural backgrounds to learn and participate in traditional Mexican arts.

Please visit this link to see a video with examples of traditional Mexican dance narrated in both English and Spanish.

Southern Oregon Folklife Survey: Douglas Manger

The National Endowment for the Arts has awarded the Oregon Folklife Network funding to conduct folklife field surveys and documentation of traditions in the southern Oregon counties. Folklorists LuAnne Kozma and Douglas Manger will be conducting the fieldwork. Kozma will be in Lake and Klamath counties starting at the end of October/ beginning of November (back in the spring!) while Manger will be in Harney and Malheur counties in April but will be begin contacting individuals in November. Read on for more information about Douglas Manger.

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Southern Oregon Folklife Survey: LuAnne Kozma

The National Endowment for the Arts has awarded the Oregon Folklife Network funding to conduct folklife field surveys and documentation of traditions in the southern Oregon counties. Folklorists LuAnne Kozma and Douglas Manger will be conducting the fieldwork. Kozma will be in Lake and Klamath counties starting at the end of October/ beginning of November (back in the spring!) while Manger will be in Harney and Malheur counties in April but will be begin contacting individuals in November. Read on for more information about LuAnne Kozma.

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