Communities Connecting Heritage

 

World Learning is administering an exciting initiative on behalf of the U.S. Department of State called Communities Connecting Heritage.

The initiative will connect US-based organizations with like-minded organizations abroad to work on a collaborative cultural heritage project, culminating in a public exhibition and reciprocal exchange program to each other’s countries.

If your organization would like to receive the application, please fill out this five-question Inquiry Form. Kindly pass this along to other individuals or organizations whom you think may have an interest in this opportunity. Thank you.

Regards,

Nicolette Regis

Program Officer, Global Exchange

World Learning
1015 15th Street NW | 7th Floor | Washington, DC 20005

T: 202.355.6466 | C: 202.413.5140

Two contract folklore positions! RFP: Due Nov 15, 2017 

Oregon Folklife Network RFP: Due Nov 15, 2017 
Folklore Fieldworkers for Willamette Valley
January – August 2018
 
The Oregon Folklife Network seeks to hire one early career (1-3 years’ experience in public folklore i.e., non-degree focusedfolklife fieldwork) AND one mid-career folklorist (at least 3-7 years’ experience in public folklore) to conduct folklife field surveys and documentation of cultural, occupational, regional, and religious traditions in the Willamette Valley counties of Polk and Benton and much of Marion, Linn, and Lane counties, including the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde (fieldwork regions will be divvied up based on the experience and backgrounds of those selected). OFN Executive Director, Riki Saltzman, will supervise this project; Saltzman and the mid-career folklorist will mentor the early career folklorist as well as an emerging folklorist during fieldwork and for presentations. This project is supported in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, Art Works.
 
The Willamette Valley stretches along 100 miles of the Willamette River, from just south of Portland in the north to Eugene in the south; it covers all of Polk and Benton and much of Marion, Linn, and Lane counties, including the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. This region includes about 45% of Oregon’s population and is bordered by the Cascade Range (east), the Coast Range (west), and the Calapooya Mountains (south). Formed by the Ice Age Missoula Floods, this highly fertile region is known for its wineries (19,000 acres of vineyards and over 500 wineries), microbreweries, hop yards, orchards, farms, rivers, and fishing.
 
The Willamette Valley includes three major cities—Salem (capital), Eugene (University of Oregon), and Corvallis (Oregon State University)—plus small towns, rural areas, several rivers, and populations from a diverse range of ethnic and regional backgrounds, including a large settlement of Russian Old Believers. This project will cover regional, ethnic, and occupational folklore, including but not limited to Asian and Pacific Islanders (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Hawai’ian, Japanese, Korean, Lao, Vietnamese), Latino (Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican), Native American (Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde), and European (Dutch, English, French, German, Irish, Italian, Norwegian, Polish, Russian, Scotch-Irish, Scottish, Swedish) as well as logging, hunting, railroad, sheep and dairy farming, orchards, viticulture, brewing, hops growing, fishing and fishing guides, boat building and other waterways traditions along with foodways, music, storytelling, and other relevant traditional expressions.
 
Documentation will include a needs assessment for regional folk arts, recommendations for OFN’s roster, a list of potential partner organizations, and programming suggestions, thus providing direction for OFN’s network function. Folklorists will also provide public programs for each county and Grand Ronde; those presentations palpably demonstrate the value of traditional arts and result in further connections and feedback.
In addition to fieldwork, each contract folklorist will also be responsible for presenting two 1-hour public programs featuring 2 documented artists in counties where the research has occurred (OFN provides assistance).
 
The fieldwork portion of this work should take place any time from January – May 2018, though April – May would be preferable; public programs (see above) must occur no later than July 2018. Pre-fieldwork contacting of culture keepers and others may begin any time after December 15, 2018. All paperwork must be completed and turned in by August 31, 2017. Fieldwork days need not be consecutive, but fieldwork times must be coordinated with Saltzman.
 
The successful applicant should have at least an MA in folklore or related discipline, such as cultural anthropology or ethnomusicology. Early career applicants should have at least 1-3 years’ professional experience in public folklore and/or folklife documentation; mid-career should have at least 3-7 years’ professional experience in public folklore and/or folklife documentation. Please note that this does NOT include work conducted as part of a degree program. 
 
Qualified applicants must have access to, experience with, and technical competence with digital equipment (camera, audio recorder, computer/laptop) and their own transportation. OFN will not cover transportation to/from Oregon.  
 
Required RFP materials:
a cover letter detailing qualifications and relevant experience as well as how the applicant will conduct the work for this projectc.v.3 relevant reference letters (no exceptions)representative work samples (please submit only digital and/or online work samples) to include recorded audio interviews (1-2 excerpts of no more than 3 minutes each). Note: interviews should be in English and on topics relevant to folk and traditional artsa self-recording (audio) with applicant’s personal introduction along with a summary of qualifications (no more than 3-4 minutes)photography (10-20 images, jpg format, with metadata: subject, date, place, purpose of original photo). Note: we are looking for ethnographic/fieldwork type photographs with contextual information as part of the photo. Simple portraits and landscapes do not qualify, and we cannot accept video. fieldnotes (5 pp max)1 published professional writing sample (festival catalogue pieces are more than fine).
 
Applications submitted without these items will be deemed incomplete and will not be considered.
 
OFN will provide:
·       preliminary contact information/introductions for several communities, folk artists, and organizations in Oregon’s Willamette Valley;
·       digital folklife fieldwork forms (audio log, photo log, general release, artist data sheet, release for internet materials); funds for disks, memory cards, batteries, etc.; funds for travel (in Oregon only) at the state rate;
·       pre-selected organizations in each county for public programs;
·       Early career folklorist: contract and fee of $300/day plus in-state travel expenses (food, mileage, lodging at state rates) for total of $9,700; and
·       Mid-career folklorist: contract and fee of $400/day plus in-state travel expenses (food, mileage, lodging at state rates) for total of $11,500.
 
The results of this folklife field survey will expand the OFN’s Culture Keepers roster; provide 6 public programs in counties where fieldwork was conducted (including one at the Oregon Historical Society); and provide cultural information, including field reports, to local cultural and arts organizations towards the creation of future programs as well as to OFN’s operational partners, the Oregon Arts Commission, the Oregon Cultural Trust, the Oregon Historical Society, Humanities Oregon, the Oregon Heritage Commission, and the Oregon State Library. As with all folklife materials, fieldwork documentation will become part of the Oregon Folklife Collection at the University of Oregon Libraries’ Special Collections and University Archives.
 
Complete applications (including all reference letters) should be sent to: 
Oregon Folklife Survey, Oregon Folklife Network, 242 Knight Library, 6204 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403-6204OR as a PDF email attachment to riki@uoregon.edu (please put FOLKLIFE SURVEY in the subject line).
 
Complete applications must be received at the OFN by November 15, 2017.
This is NOT a postmark deadline.
 
For further information, please contact Riki Saltzman or Emily West Hartlerode at 541/346-3820 or riki@uoregon.edu or eafanado@uoregon.edu. Riki will be at AFS if you have questions.​

Apply Now! Native American and Culture Foundation Mentor Artist Fellowships

The call is now open to established American Indian and Alaska Native artists to apply for a one-year NACF Mentor Artist Fellowship to mentor an emerging American Indian and Alaska Native artist apprentice. Established artists should have at least ten years of experience in the Traditional Arts or Contemporary Visual Arts fields.

Applications will be accepted until 5 p.m. Pacific Time, on Monday, November 6, 2017

Awarded Mentors will develop lesson plans intended to increase their apprentice’s skill level, and provide an experience of intergenerational exchange of cultural knowledge within the apprentice’s traditional arts or contemporary visual arts practice. To assist in developing lesson plans, awarded mentors and their apprentices are required to attend a training session before the mentorship begins. The training date will be announced upon notification of the awards.

This is a regional fellowship focusing in the Pacific Northwest, Southwest and Upper Midwest areas of the United States. Eligible applicants must be at least a five-year resident of, and enrolled in an American Indian tribe or Alaska Native corporation located in Alaska, Arizona, Minnesota, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Southern California (Imperial, Kern, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Ventura counties), Washington or Wisconsin. Submission of documentation of American Indian and Alaska Native heritage is part of the application process.

First year Mentor Artist Fellow Lani Hotch (Chilkat Indian Village) said of receiving her award, “I’ve tried to work with groups of weavers, and I’m excited to work one on one with somebody so they know all the steps. In the last few months we’ve lost two weavers (…).  I’m feeling a real compulsion to teach somebody.” Mentor Artist FellowShirod Younker (Coquille, Coos) said in response to the mentor training, “[A] good way to build focus [on] what we are doing and think about the macro vision of the projects in conjunction with each other.”

The Mentor Artist Fellowship is a monetary award of $30,000 — $20,000 to the mentor, $5,000 for the joint art project and $5,000 for the apprentice’s expenses — gas, supplies. Applications will undergo a selection process and fellowship awardees will be announced in the Spring of 2018. The mentoring period will be from July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019. To demonstrate the experience and success of the mentoring, a completed joint mentor/apprentice art project is required at the Fellowship’s end.

For more information and to apply click here.

To learn more about previous NACF Mentor Artist Fellows, visit our website at http://www.nativeartsandcultures.org/mentor-fellowships.

The Mentor Artist Fellowship Program is generously supported by individual donors and regional funders committed to preserving and perpetuating Native arts and cultures. NACF is grateful to the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation for supporting an Oregon Mentor Fellow.

Books! Books! OFN New Releases

Alina Mansfield

We are pleased to announce the release of Oregon Folklife Network’s first publication: Culture Keepers of Eastern Oregon. In the Spring of 2016, Folklorists Douglas Manger and Joseph O’Connell visited communities throughout the Eastern Oregon region and interviewed cowboys, ranchers, quilters, water witchers, stone masons, old time musicians, community poets, fly tiers, fishing guides and more. This folklife survey into the “deep west” of Eastern Oregon, was made possible thanks to generous funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, Art Works, and the Oregon Historical Society.

Culture Keepers of Eastern Oregon features over 40 photographs and biographies of traditional artists throughout the Eastern Oregon counties of Baker, Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Union, Wallowa, and Wheeler. Douglas Manger explains, “Our effort was to record unique culture keepers at their home place, particularly those held in close esteem for the craft they are upholding, their striving for excellence, their giving back while teaching others.” Joseph O’Connell notes, “Our conversations explored how broad traditions, like rodeo sports or cowboy poetry, take on new dimensions in local places.”

Keep an eye out this summer for our upcoming publication, Oregon Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Master Artists: 2012-2016, which will highlight the 23 master artist teams who received TAAP awards from 2012-2016. This photo essay provides a tantalizing glimpse into Oregon’s cultural traditions and the artists who make them thrive.

 

Remembering Carol Spellman

With deep sadness, we mourn the passing of dear friend and colleague Carol Spellman, 1951-2017. Carol was a folklorist’s folklorist. The Oregon Folklife Network, the state of Oregon, and the entire field of folklore would be the poorer without Carol’s impressive body of work for the Oregon Folklife Program.

“All who knew Carol are invited by her family to honor her memory at a Celebration of Life/Irish Wake at The Evergreen, 618 SE Alder St, Portland on March 8 from 5 to 8 p.m.”

The UO Folklore community is very grateful for the Spellman family’s very generous designation of UO’s Folklore Program to receive donations in Carol’s memory.

“The Folklore Program at U of O has established a fund in Carol’s name to assist graduate students to work in the field that she loved so much. Donations may be made to the Carol B. Spellman Public Folklore Fund, Attn: Beth Magee, Folklore Program, 1287 University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403.”

“Carol Beth Spellman passed away peacefully with her family by her side on January 26, 2017 due to complications from treatment for leukemia.

Born October 19, 1951 in Oakland, California to Edmund and Helen (Heber) Stone, Carol lived her early years in Hayward before the family moved to San Leandro. Continue reading

Oregon Folklife Network RFP: Seeks Folklore Fieldworkers for Portland Metro

Oregon Folklife Network RFP: Due August 5, 2016
Folklore Fieldworkers for Portland Metro
FY2017 (November 2016)

The Oregon Folklife Network seeks to hire one or two emerging/early career folklorists (1-3 years’ experience in public folklore or with non-degree focused folklife fieldwork) to work in collaboration with veteran folklorists Nancy Nusz and Douglas Manger during the month of November 2016. Folklorists will conduct folklife field surveys and documentation of cultural, occupational, regional, and religious traditions in the Portland Metro counties of Washington, Multnomah, Yamhill, Columbia, and Clackamas (fieldwork regions will be divvied up based on the experience and backgrounds of those selected). OFN Executive Director, Riki Saltzman, will supervise this project and veteran folklorists Nancy Nusz and Douglas Manger will mentor the emerging folklorists during fieldwork. This project is supported in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, Art Works.

Continue reading

Welcome, New Staff!

RidoutEmily Ridout, M.A., is OFN’s Interim Program Manager through July 2016.  She holds a concurrent position as the Program Coordinator for the Confucius Institute for Global China Studies. Ridout has an MA in Folklore and a certificate in New Media and Culture from the University of Oregon where she filmed, edited, and produced documentary films on topics ranging from environmental tourism to the chemistry of effective birth control.  Her research interests include intersections of culture and environment, poetics, foodways, documentary, and religion. While a graduate student intern and post-graduate fellow at OFN, Ridout worked on the Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program and a National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellowship nomination.

Ridout strives to develop and promote meaningful cultural programming in ways that are innovative, sustainable, and respectful. Before coming to the University of Oregon, Ridout led educational and adventure trips in the Fiji Islands, the Southern California mountains, Kentucky, and throughout the Midwest and Appalachia. When she is not working with cultural programming, she can be found teaching and practicing yoga, hiking, or writing what she hopes is the next great American novel.

 


brunoBruno Seraphin
, Oregon Folklife Network’s Winter Fellow, is a folklorist, narrative and documentary filmmaker, and musician. Originally from Massachusetts, he earned a BFA in Film Production from New York University and lived in Appalachian North Carolina for several years, before moving to Eugene to complete an MA in Folklore Studies at the University of Oregon. His academic and professional interests include environmental justice, human-plant relationships, philosophies of place and space, anti-racist organizing, collaborative film-making, and the ways that social movements generate and use stories.

Seraphin produced and directed the award winning experimental independent film “If I Had Wings to Fly,” which explores traditional music and storytelling in Western North Carolina. It was featured at the Folklorists in the South conference in 2012. His newest documentary, “Year of the Possum: The Green Grass Cloggers’ 40th,” will premiere in 2016. Seraphin’s MA thesis, “Stories We Live: On the Hoop with Nomads of the Northwest,” is an ethnography of a grassroots network of nomadic, mostly white “rewilders.” His subjects use Indigenous ecological knowledge to harvest and replant wild foods in the Great Basin region of the United States, particularly northeastern Oregon. Seraphin’s thesis pays special attention to their land ethic and their interactions with Native groups.

During spring 2016, Seraphin will serve as a Project Coordinator for a series of collaborative documentary videos for the Museum of Natural and Cultural History and Oregon Tribes.

FisherPoets Exhibit On Display

Julie Meyer

Picture1

In September, OFN opened the exhibit “Shifting Tides: Women of the FisherPoets Gathering” in our Knight Library office Window Gallery on the University of Oregon campus. This exhibit highlights the creative work that women fishermen Moe Bowstern, Erin Fristad, and Tele Aadsen perform at the annual FisherPoets Gathering in Astoria, Oregon. The FisherPoets Gathering encourages commercial fishermen to share their occupational experiences through their creative expressions. The Gathering offers women fisherpoets a space to begin disrupting the underrepresentation of women working in a predominantly male occupation.

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The exhibit consists of three cases and two wall panels. The first case provides a brief history of the FisherPoets Gathering, while the second provides an excerpt from Moe Bowstern’s “Subcutaneous Layer of Fat,” a prose work that addresses sexist expectations for women fishermen. Copies of the FisherPoets Anthology, Anchored in Deep Water, and Bowstern’s XTRATUF zine line the bottom of the case.

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The final case displays fishing gear, commercial grade rain gear, netting, a slide show of women fishing in Alaska, and various other objects that exhibit coordinator and folklorist, Julie Meyer, gathered during her fieldwork on commercial fishing in Bristol Bay, Alaska. A final panel provides excerpts from Erin Fristad’s poem “Advice to Female Deckhands” and Tele Aadsen’s prose piece “Being a Female: An Unwelcome Reminder” both of which deal with issues of inequality that women fishermen face. The exhibit will be on display through mid-February 2016.

New Exhibit: Buckaroo Traditions of Oregon

by Adrienne Decker

Photo courtesy of Douglas Manger

Photo courtesy of Douglas Manger

The Oregon Folklife Network (OFN) is proud to present its new exhibit Buckaroo Traditions of OregonThis exhibit celebrates the continuity of occupational traditions in rural Oregon and encourages audience understanding and appreciation of art forms arising from ranching practices. The exhibit was made possible by funding from the National Endowment for the Arts and the fieldwork of folklorists Douglas Manger and LuAnne Kozma. Featuring artists from Malheur, Harney and Lake counties, the exhibit traces the development from vaquero to buckaroo and promotes the work of some of Oregon’s finest gear makers.

Cowboys have made an enduring mark on the American popular imagination, but not every cowboy is a buckaroo. What sets them apart? In addition to their sense of style and self-sufficiency, buckaroos work almost exclusively from horseback in the manner of their vaquero predecessors. In the Great Basin, knowledge of many vaquero and buckaroo traditions have been passed along through families and become integrated into the lives of working ranchers and horsemen. Buckaroos are unique in their use of extensive horse training techniques and custom handcrafted gear, including traditional saddles featuring intricate leather- and silverwork as well as mecates (ropes) made from horse mane hair and braided rawhide reatas (lassos).

Some of the most vibrant examples of buckaroo artistic traditions are thriving in rural eastern and southern Oregon, despite their decline elsewhere. Buckaroo Traditions of Oregon features a hackamore from the workshop of Bill and Teresa Black, mecates by Merlin Rupp and Helen Dougal Corbari, and the tooled leatherwork of saddle makers Steve McKay and Len Babb. Each of these pieces represents a unique blend of hard work and artistry.

Buckaroo Traditions of Oregon is on display now in the OFN exhibit cases on the second floor of UO Knight Library, Room 242.

It’s a Hard Duck Life

by Jules Helweg-Larsen

Living in Eugene, it is impossible to escape Duck Pride as Oregon football fandom. Church sermons invoke the Ducks and refer to the team’s hard work and dedication. Grocery store transactions and chats at local cafes or gas stations conclude with “Go Ducks!” Fans wear school colors and jerseys, as well as shirts stating “QUACK ATTACK” and “Come to the Duck Side”.

In January, Eugene was buzzing with excitement over the first College Football Playoff National Championship with UO Ducks taking on the Ohio State Buckeyes. On and off campus, there was a constant chatter about the game from both fans and normally disinterested residents. Social media posts and tweets were fast and furious as fans and friends cheered on their team. Trending hashtags included #DucksvsBucks #GoDucks and, after their defeat, #OnceADuckAlwaysADuck.

So what is it about sports that promotes such loyalty, not just from students and alumni, but also the city and state at large? Is it only the pride and national recognition, or is it something deeper? “Being an Oregon Duck is not about winning,” said Emma Oravecz, a graduate student in the UO Folklore program. “It’s not about trophies or points. Being a Duck is about being part of a community that reaches far beyond the scoreboard.” This community of students and players is one that she is “proud to be a part of and will continue to support throughout my entire life.”

Becoming a duck can be as simple as attending the university, living in Oregon, or being a dedicated booster. Duck mania is everywhere and inescapable here in the land of the webfoot—the old name for an Oregonian. Whether we win or lose, Duck pride is integral to Oregon identity—part of our community folklore. Tell us about your favorite Oregon Football Fandom moments with a comment on our Facebook page!

Photo from the University of Oregon Libraries shows the Quack Ops logo seen in town. No longer operating, Quack Ops was a student-run business for "underground apparel for ducks, by ducks," where fans took their representation into their own hands.

Photo from the University of Oregon Libraries shows the Quack Ops logo seen in town. No longer operating, Quack Ops was a student-run business for “underground apparel for ducks, by ducks,” where fans took their representation into their own hands.