Oregon Folklife Network to Receive $55,000 Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts

The Oregon Folklife Network is pleased to announce that National Endowment for the Arts Acting Chairman Mary Anne Carter has approved more than $27 million in grants as part of the Arts Endowment’s first major funding announcement for fiscal year 2019.  Included in this announcement is an Art Works grant of $55,000 to the Oregon Folklife Network to support a folklife survey on Oregon’s north and central coast. Art Works is the Arts Endowment’s principal grantmaking program. The agency received 1,605 Art Works applications for this round of grantmaking, and will award 972 grants in this category.

“The arts enhance our communities and our lives, and we look forward to seeing these projects take place throughout the country, giving Americans opportunities to learn, to create, to heal, and to celebrate,” said Mary Anne Carter, acting chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts.

“OFN is thrilled to have another year of NEA support for our documentation of Oregon’s living cultural heritage,” commented Riki Saltzman, OFN’s Executive Director.

During 2019, the Oregon Folklife Network will work with veteran folklorist Douglas Manger to identify culture keepers in cultural, occupational, regional, and religious traditions in the Northwest and Central Oregon Coast counties of Clatsop, Tillamook, and Lincoln, as well as the coastal sections of Lane and Douglas counties. Manger will also be mentoring emerging folklorists as they document regional and ethnic folklore from a range of heritage groups including but not limited to Asian and Pacific Islanders, African Americans, Latinos, Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, and Europeans (English, Danish, Finnish, German, Irish, Norwegian, Russian, Scotch-Irish, Scottish, Swedish, Swiss) as well as occupational folklife such as chainsaw carving, hunting, dairy farming, commercial fishing, clamming, oystering, shrimping, and other waterways traditions. Folklorists will also document foodways, music, storytelling, and other relevant folk expressions.

The OFN’s statewide survey has so far identified over 355 folk and traditional artists in 28 counties as well as at the Klamath Tribes, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, the Confederated Tribes of Umatilla, the Burns Paiute, and the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. OFN partners with local and state organizations and Tribes to refer tradition bearers and folk artists for programs in parks, arts organizations, libraries, or festivals. We also preserve this documentation in our archives.

Please contact Riki Saltzman, riki@uoregon.edu, or Emily West, eafanado@uoregon.edu,  phone 541-346-3820, if you know of folks we should be documenting.

For more information on this National Endowment for the Arts grant announcement, visit arts.gov/news.

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