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A woman aging imperceptibly in minutes

October 24, 2013 by oaldakhe@uoregon.edu   

Hey Guys!

So, we saw many time-lapse shots in most videos in this class, and they were usually time-lapse of landscapes. But this video does a time-lapse on a woman as she is aging imperceptibly in minutes.

The Filmmaker did that by taking photos of different women in different ages who come from the same family and with he same bone structures, and then he animated them in editing to create this amazing piece. he had them sit in the same place and use the same kind of lighting and background to make the illusion as if it’s the same person. Enjoy watching!

Danielle from Anthony Cerniello on Vimeo.


5 Comments »

  1. lpaters5@uoregon.edu says:

    So interesting! I am fascinating by time-lapse, especially after watching more about how it’s done on Lynda and realizing it’s usually done in raw stills. I wonder how he made this one. The music also adds quite a lot to this piece, I think.

  2. bjh@uoregon.edu says:

    While watching this I kept looking all around her face to notice anything. When I didn’t see anything is when it hit me that is aging. It isn’t something that we can see and perceive in a moments notice but is constantly happening. I’m just interested in how the filmmaker did this, was it several different people who all happen to look alike? Or did he use a computer generated model?

  3. jarrattt@uoregon.edu says:

    They took photos at a family reunion and then found the people in the family across ages that had similar bone structures. Then the animators edited the photos to look like the same person at different ages. Then they made the photos morph to make it look like aging. Pretty cool!

    Here is an article that describes the process: http://petapixel.com/2013/09/10/incredible-timelapse-like-aging-animation-made-family-portraits/

  4. kblack7@uoregon.edu says:

    Thanks for sharing that information Jarratt because understanding the process helps a lot! I love the overall concept of watching this woman age without being able to really see any overarching change. It is very emblematic for how we age as well. Sometimes when I look at pictures of myself from the not-so-distant past, I am always amazed to see how I have already changed and aged so much! Sad but true.

  5. amandae@uoregon.edu says:

    Hey –this made me think of a number of timelapses chronicalling change I’ve seen on different youtube sites. One is a guy who took a photo everyday of the year, the other of a person under going a sex change over the course of a year. They are all fascinating for the same way that the staccato movement keeps the mind continually engaged, and waiting to see what will happen next.

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