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Process: The Making of a Chair

October 18, 2013 by emcdona2@uoregon.edu   

Phloem Studio // The Peninsula Chair from Quimby on Vimeo.

I chose this piece in connection with our assignment, Story Without Words. Also, my “special man friend” is a furniture maker. With the interest of making a film about his work at some point in the near future, I have been looking at films of people making things for guidance. I found this to be a great application of visual storytelling, which created a compelling and dynamic short film without words. I found the editing, specifically that it was in sync with the music, well structured. Contrary to my usual preference, I liked the lack of background sounds. I felt this added to the magical kind of mood. The relatively rapid edits kept me engaged and excited to see what would happen next. This seemed particularly important in cases such as this, with minimal audio stimulation.  Lastly, I enjoyed the films use of depth and focus. I found that the high percentage of extreme close ups made me feel a part of the process.


2 Comments »

  1. jarrattt@uoregon.edu says:

    I love how this kind of process lends itself to capturing those little details moments that work so well in video. Getting all of the drilling moments, woods moving through saw, and cutting fabric is so fun to shoot and edit. Just getting to know the process of producing something is engaging. It’s like a newer and more stylized version of factory production videos where you get to see how things are made. I love those!

    Also, I know that guy in the video! He dated a friend of mine. Haha!

  2. amandae@uoregon.edu says:

    This video is a great example of the classic, well-produced, video that I always wish I could make, and never take the time to dissect properly. So thank you! I just realized that movement is one of the elements that fundamentally effects the feel of the piece, but I don’t usually use. They’ve got the camera slowly moving in most of the opening frames, so it seems like we’re being show around. I usually do static shots without movement, but it makes it flow better. Note taken!

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