LTS

Language Teaching Studies Blog Site at the University of Oregon

November 11, 2017
by zachp
0 comments

Student Spotlight: 2017-2018 LTS Student Yumiko Omata.

I am thrilled to introduce you to current LTS student Yumiko Omata!

Hi Yumiko! Please tell the world a little bit about yourself:

2017-18 LTS student Yumiko Omata.

I am originally from Japan. After high school, I moved to Tokyo to study art and to work for ten years. In 2000, I moved to Austin, TX to study English for a year or so but ended up staying here for 17 years instead. I met my favorite person/best friend (my husband) the next morning after arriving in Austin! He was one of my housemates and actually the first person I talked to in the US. Life is fun and crazy! Since then, I have lived in several cities in the US and studied painting at the University of Arizona. From 2010-2011, I also lived in South America (Argentina and Ecuador) and enjoyed traveling and learning Spanish. After returning to the states, I settled down in Portland, OR and found a job teaching Japanese and I fell in love with teaching. Art (painting, ceramics, making furniture, etc.), travel and language are my passions. Gardening as well! I miss my garden, chickens, and honey bees left behind in Portland very much.

 Aw, what a lovely story! So, out of all of the programs in the world, how did you end up at LTS?

It is a great question because this blog was the beginning of everything! I was planning to apply to the TESOL program at Portland State University and even took a prerequisite course in summer 2016. I had a few concerns about PSU and started searching other programs on the West Coast and found the LTS blog featuring Keisuke (2015-2016 LTS alumnus). I directly contacted him and he kindly shared his experience in the LTS program and gave me great insight. Then, I visited the program on December 1st (almost a year ago!) and met our director, Keli. Keli warmly welcomed me and made a wonderful impression and let me observe a couple of classes. Also, the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures (EALL) is another reason I chose LTS. EALL offers the oldest, most well-established Japanese courses in the U.S, and I was hoping to be a part of EALL in order to explore the academic field. The program, people (Keli, Laura, and LTS students), and a possible opportunity to be involved with EALL convinced me I had to be here.

Well LTS is very lucky to have you! And have you been enjoying the program so far?

I am very happy with my decision. I like that the LTS program helps me establish both practical and theoretical foundations and it is very organized and tailored to guide us to find our own path as a language teacher/educator. As I mentioned, people (Keli, Trish, other LTS professors, and the 2017-2018 LTS cohort) are wonderful. I appreciate the faculty members’ enthusiasm and willingness to communicate and support us; they are very approachable. Some of my cohort are from other countries, and I remember my old days as an international student and they definitely inspire me. I was hoping to meet people who teach or are interest in teaching foreign languages other than English, but I definitely enjoy learning EFL/ESL teaching perspectives since it has vast, great resources that I can apply to my field.

What are you hoping to gain from the program?

I am hoping to establish a solid theoretical and professional foundation in second language acquisition and language pedagogy. At the same time, my interest of study is Japanese pedagogy, so it is nice for me to have opportunities to take Japanese and East Asian linguistic courses while studying LTS.

Great goals! Speaking of, I know you’re teaching Japanese this term, what has that experience been like?

It has been wonderful and rewarding in many different ways! This is my first term to teach Japanese as a graduate employee (GE) and it has given me great insight into JFL at an institution of higher education. Before I started this term, I was kind of worried about how to find a balance between my busy academic life as a student and teaching as a GE. Now I feel I found a good rhythm bouncing between the two. I am currently teaching a JPN 101 (first year Japanese) discussion course. I enjoy seeing how students break through language barriers and become Japanese language speakers. They are fun to teach, and I am very impressed by their progress. Interactions with my students, Japanese instructors, and colleagues have been enhancing my life, and I feel that I am part of an academic community. I am quite busy, but it has been a driving force to help me achieve my goals in the LTS program. In the past, I taught Japanese at a small community-based language center in Portland, OR for four years, but my students were all age groups except college students. I started noticing differences between the learners/ institutions and that has been helping me expand my perspective as a teacher quite a bit. One of my GE duties is a weekly observation, and it is an important and great benefit for me to observe courses taught by highly experienced Japanese instructors. I am able to grasp their techniques and teaching styles, which inspire and broaden my future vision of myself as a teacher.

Sounds like a wonderful and rewarding experience indeed! Any final thoughts?

If anyone is interested in the LTS program, don’t hesitate to visit us. Eugene is beautiful, tranquil, and a perfect place to study.

Thanks so much for sharing your incredible journey Yumiko!

 

October 27, 2017
by zachp
0 comments

Student Spotlight: Shayleen EagleSpeaker and Brittany Parham

It’s my pleasure to introduce two current LTS students: Shayleen EagleSpeaker and Brittany Parham. Both come to the LTS program via the Northwest Indian Language Institute (NILI).

Please tell the world a little bit about yourself:

My name is Shayleen EagleSpeaker (Wasco, member of Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs). My heritage language is Kiksht. Our people are from the Columbia River, both sides of the river. My grandmother was a fluent speaker of Kiksht and she passed away in the mid 1990s. Today there are no longer fluent native speakers of Kiksht, but I am learning. I heard about the LTS program through Northwest Indian Language Institute about 5 years ago. I graduated from UO with a Bachelor of Fine Art in Printmaking in 2014 and I returned to LTS in summer of 2017 to further pursue a career in teaching Native languages.

My name is Brittany Parham. I was born and raised in Eugene. I received my BA in Linguistics from the University of Oregon in 2016 and have  been studying Ichishkíin for 3 ½ years.

Have you been enjoying the LTS program so far?

Brittany: Yes, of course!

Shayleen: LTS is awesome! I am so glad to be in a program that is flexible for Native American languages. Its also a great cohort, all the people have a very nice quality that is great for the sense of community. I think it is interesting to experience how we relate through our coursework, and watching each other go through this learning process is pretty wonderful. I have learned so much already, and it is really expanding my understanding of how to teach second languages.

What are you hoping to learn in the program?

Brittany: I want to learn some better tools to use in order to support Ichishkíin learners and teachers. I hope to create more curriculum and materials for the classroom, create teacher training resources, and learn the methods and techniques to be an effective language teacher.

Shayleen: I am hoping to learn a lot more Kiksht language and to network with people and organizations that support the kind of work that I am trying to do. I want teachers of Native languages to have opportunities for success. What I have learned in the past is that when Native language teachers are supported in their communities, and supportive of each other, they really seem to enjoy their work and their working relationships. I have found a lot of positive energy and joy in these relationships and I want to make a positive impact by being supportive of others.

And I know you both work closely with NILI…What exactly is NILI and why is it so important to you?

Robert Elliot (LTS and NILI faculty member)
introduces NILI to the LT 608 class

Brittany: NILI stands for the Northwest Indian Language Institute. It was formed in 1997 by tribal requests for Native language teacher training programs. NILI provides training in applied language training in linguistics during our yearly Summer Institute, as was as providing consultations to tribes in the areas of language program design, assessment, policy, linguistics, language documenting and archiving and grant writing. NILI is important to me for so many reasons! I love being a part of something as important as NILI, and being surrounded by so many amazing and influential people. I would not be where I am today without the guidance and influence of NILI!

Shayleen: I first became involved in NILI because I was taking Chinuk Wawa (Columbia River trade jargon) language classes at Lane Community College. My instructor for that class was Dr. Janne Underrinner, who is Director of NILI and pretty much of the main founders of NILI. I was really inspired by what NILI had to offer for two reasons: 1) I had been wanting to learn my heritage language my whole life and I never expected in a million years that I would have the opportunity to do so in an American college or university, and 2) the way that NILI functions is very culturally sensitive and they also do an excellent job at it. After graduating from LCC with an associates degree I participated in my first NILI summer institute, then transferred to University of Oregon where I majored in Fine Art but also took 2 years of Ichishkíin (Yakima Sahaptin) language. Both Chinuk Wawa and Ichishkíin are heritage languages to me. I am Wasco, and my people historically have been very multi-lingual. Our primary language, however, is Kiksht (Upper Chinookan) and I am learning that language now, through independent study at UO. This is literally a dream come true for me! I feel like NILI was a huge catalyst in making that happen for me.

So what projects are you hoping to work on?

Shayleen: Right now, I have some ideas about what I want to do while Im in the LTS program, but I also realize I need to keep my options open and be open to learning because there may be opportunities that I dont know about yet. I am hoping to gain more administrative skills because a lot of Native language teaching requires opportunities to teach and in my context, I believe I will have to be creating some of those opportunities for myself and I hope to be able to do that for others as well. I am also really interested in research opportunities for my language, including linguistic research. Right now, I need to get a grasp on fundamentals of linguistics, which is what I am working on in courses Im taking. That involves a lot of reading and background knowledge. Beyond that I think Ill be open to different project ideas that I will learn about throughout the LTS training.

Brittany: I am hoping to work on creating an online resource for teachers of the language to connect, collaborate and share resources more easily.

How can people help with the preservation and restoration of these incredible languages?

Brittany: People can help by educating themselves about the indigenous peoples locally and beyond. And everyone is welcome to volunteer at our Summer Institute!

Shayleen: I think just people sharing an interest of these languages helps tremendously. When people take the time to learn little bit about Native language preservation and restoration, they are doing a service to the larger community. The Pacific Northwest is historically one of the most linguistically diverse places in the world, so when people support these languages, they are supporting the cultural diversity of this beautiful place. The rate of decline of these languages is one of the fastest in the world as well, so we stand to lose about half of our languages in the United States by the next 50 years. In other words, we are at the top of the list for having the most to lose with regards to languages lost. I want people to know about that and share that information in a positive and supportive way, because the time is right now to make efforts to preserve these languages. Preservation includes documentation and training for archival work, and ideally, teaching it to children who can grow up with Native languages, which is a method called language revitalization. Promoting these activities is the best way to help, whether that means sharing information about opportunities and activity with your networks, or becoming involved in the Native language community, or even by sharing this background info with people who might not know about it. Also, support any education programs that may support Native language revitalization. I think Oregon just passed a law about teaching appropriate Native American curriculum, but that could also extend into languages, where culturally sensitive and appropriate.

Any final thoughts?

Shayleen: It has been really nice to meet people in the LTS program who are from all different walks of life. I have been able to share information about Native languages and to hear the feedback that most people are very interested in it and I really appreciate that! It has been nice be a part of the LTS community as a forum to talk about various language contexts and I think we will all benefit greatly from it because it will help us to create a sense of community as future language teachers. So, I think that the community aspect of the LTS cohort is very important.

Brittany: If you want more information about NILI, check out our webpage!

Welcome to the Northwest Indian Language Institute

Thank you two so much for taking the time to introduce yourselves and share your passion for this very important topic!

October 14, 2017
by zachp
0 comments

Spanish Language Learning APP LingroToGo!

Check out today’s post about a revolutionary Spanish language learning application called LingroToGo. Featured is Dr. Julie Sykes–our very own LTS faculty member and Director of CASLS (Center for Applied Second Language Studies)–along with a couple LTS students who have worked on the app.

Dr. Julie Sykes presenting to the LTS cohort about CASLS and LingroToGo

Julie, thank you so much for joining us today. Please share with us what makes this APP so special:

LingroToGo is the first comprehensive app that explicitly targets language learning strategies, pragmatics, and function-based language learning. Moving beyond the translation of words and phrases, the app really helps people work on how to use the words and structures they learn in a meaningful way.

What about the pragmatic component of it?

Pragmatics really focuses on the exchanges of meaning and the avoidance of miscommunication whenever possible. It is exciting to see pragmatic components of language treated systematically throughout the app.

And there’s video too?

Yep. There are a robust set of videos that focus on strategies and pragmatics, the two pieces of a language learning curriculum which are often not seen in teaching and learning materials.

Awesome! And just curious, where did the name LingroToGo come from?

The Lingro part of the name comes from our collaborative partner, Lingro Learning and the ToGo piece parallels the name of one of our other tools, LinguafolioToGo, a comprehensive e-portfolio designed for language classroom.

LTS (2017) alum Dan White, who developed the Cryptogram feature of the Lingro App as his Master’s Project, had this to say about his time working on Lingro: “The Lingro App was a very fortuitous opportunity for me, as I was hoping to find a project that revolved around creating a game or puzzle for language teaching. I had never done app development before, but I was familiar with coding. Fortunately, Julie gave me the opportunity, and the app development team were very patient with me as I learned how to develop the Cryptogram. I was so pleased that my contribution made it into the final product, and it really stands out when you are using the app as one of the most challenging features. I can take this app development experience with me in the future, and I look forward to developing my own language apps.”

Current LTS student and CASLS GE (Graduate Employee) Zach Patrick-Riley: “This app is simply revolutionary. It does a perfect job of showing what 21st century education should include; not just a focus on language but strategies for successful interpersonal communication and autonomy building. My favorite part has to be the videos in each section. Maybe I am a little biased because I have helped create a number of them, but they are so fun and engaging to watch! Seriously, check out this app, te va a encantar y aprender español muy rápido.”

Other LTS students who have contributed to this app include Christopher Daradics (2016) and Valeria Ochoa (2017).

LingroToGo is available for download for IOS right now @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/lingrotogo/id1273904866?mt=8

Android is coming very soon as well! In fact, if you would like to take part in Beta testing please sign up here:  https://goo.gl/forms/VSGlmNBIfBS26yL13

September 29, 2017
by zachp
0 comments

Introducing the 2017-2018 LTS Cohort!

I am so thrilled to introduce you to the 2017-2018 LTS cohort!
As you will see below, we have a wonderful mix of backgrounds that all share a strong passion for teaching, learning, and exploring the world.

Alexis Busso (Oregon coast in a little town called Bandon): As an undergraduate, my focus in the International Studies department was cross cultural communication and education. This professional concentration sparked my interest in language learning and language teaching. I decided to join the LTS program because I have a huge love and passion for teaching and traveling. The LTS program will provide me with the skills and resources to teach students from a diversity of backgrounds. 

Brittany Parham (born and raised in Eugene, OR) I joined LTS in order to become a resource to better support the language revitalization efforts of the Sahaptin language, an indigenous language of the Columbia River spoken in Oregon and Washington. After I graduate, I plan to aid in language teacher training programs, as well as teach and advocate for the language at the University of Oregon.

Lee Joseph Huddleston (Eugene, OR): After serving in the Peace Corps for two years in Micronesia, I knew that I wanted to be a teacher. Through that experience I came to see teaching, especially teaching language, as a way of empowering others to bring about positive change in their lives and their communities through communication, the exchange of ideas and the expansion of consciousness and perspectives. I joined LTS to gain strong theoretical background knowledge and experience by collaborating with professions in my field. This Master’s degree combined with my passion for teaching will better allow me to excel in the competitive teaching market.

Logan (Bellevue WA by way of Bellingham, WA) After a fun and comfortable five years in Bellingham at Western Washington University getting my BA in Linguistics, I originally left undergrad thinking I would head straight into doctoral work in linguistics. However, after a lot of soul-searching (and a few deadlines missed on purpose) I decided to pursue my newly-discovered love of teaching. I looked at a few teacher-training MA programs, but nothing really clicked until I found the LTS program here at UO, which enabled me to explore teaching while catering to my love of language. I’m so happy and excited to be in this program with all these wonderful people that make up the cohort, the faculty, and everyone else. Big things in store for the future!

Ngan (Ngân) Ho Chi Minh City (or used-to-be Saigon), Vietnam. What attracted me to the program was that although LTS is an intensive program, it offers great flexibility in terms of the language that students are interested in teaching, choices of electives in different UO departments and many opportunities for internships so that students can gain hands-on experiences during the program.

Shayleen EagleSpeaker:  Wasco is my tribe and I am from the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs of Oregon. I am studying the Wasco language, Kiksht at UO as part of my LTS program. I came to the LTS program because I am really interested in linguistics and also because I have a passion for learning and teaching Indigenous languages, especially from my tribal heritage. The University of Oregon has a wonderful Northwest Indian Language Institute and they offer a lot of support for the learning and teaching of several Indigenous languages of Oregon, Washington, California and others. I would not have known about LTS if it were not for NILI and the outreach from NILI over 6 years ago when I was first introduced to their programming at Lane Community College when I found out about Chinuk Wawa language class. So I think it is really important to talk about how NILI has created this whole career path and made it possible for me and many others to study, teach and perpetuate Indigenous languages, especially because many of us may have not found another way to make it possible. I believe that learning languages in college has been a good fit for me, and there are other ways to learn, but in our modern society it is not that easy. So I’m really thankful for this part of higher education at the University of Oregon.

Yumiko Omata (Japan) The program offers me valuable opportunities such as specializing in teaching both English and Japanese and taking elective courses in East Asian linguistics and language pedagogy. Also, the possibility of gaining teaching practice at the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures would give me insight into JFL/JSL teacher education.

Yuxin Cheng (China) The reason why I joined LTS is because I was volunteering at a Chinese immersion school in Salt Lake City, Utah. Then I realized that I am interested in language teaching through my volunteer experience. So, I decided to switch my undergraduate major from Accounting to Linguistics. My favorite quote is from Harvard’s first female president Drew Gilpin Faust. She said, ” Don’t park 20 blocks from your destination because you think you will never find a space. Go where you want to be and then circle back to where you have to be”.

Zach Patrick-Riley (Anchorage, Alaska): I try to live my life by the mantra “Be the change you wish to see in the world” and this program helps me do just that. I absolutely love teaching… Seeing a student’s eyes light up when they learn something new is an indescribable feeling, and I am so happy to be pursuing a degree and profession that makes me be my best possible self, and helps others achieve their dreams. Not to mention I love traveling 😉

 

August 18, 2017
by gkm
0 comments

LTS 2016 – 2017 Cohort Final Presentations: A Brief Summary and a Fond Farewell

LTS 2016 – 2017 Cohort Final Presentation: A Brief Summary

As the 2016-2017 LTS program comes to a close, the presentations are finished and the finalized projects are rolling in! As this year’s cohort gets ready for their next big adventures in the wilds of language teaching around the globe, this final blog post for the Summer 2017 term will provide a brief glimpse of the hard work and dedication the graduates have put into bettering themselves as language educators, and into bettering the world of language education as a whole. If you missed out on the presentations this year, here is a small gallery of snapshots of each presenter’s work!

Women Teaching Women English: A Contemporary Women Writers Course for Female English Language and Literature Students in Egyptian Universities by Devon Hughes

 

Academic Writing Skills for International Students of Chemistry at a U.S. University by George Minchillo

 

Farewell to your ‘Inauthentic Chinese’: A Materials Portfolio for Improving CFL Learners’ Pragmatic Competence by Heidi Shi

 

Marching to Different Drummers: Teaching a Mixed Class of Heritage and Non-Heritage Learners of Russian with Motivation in Mind by Iryna Zagoruyko

 

Korean as a Second Language for English Speaking Husbands: a Multi-cultural Family Situation-based Curriculum by Jiyoon Lee

 

An Adaptive Place–Conscious Ichishkíin Materials Portfolio by Joliene Adams

 

Crafting a Brand in English for English Language Learning (ELL) College Athletes by Juli Accurso

 

Using TBLT to Address Locative Phrase Word Order Transfer Errors from English L1 to Chinese L2 by Lin Zhu

 

Deciphering the Cryptogram: A Word Puzzle Supplement to Traditional Lexicogrammatical Acquisition by Dan White

 

Using Literature to Develop Critical Thinking and Reading Skills in an EFL Class at University by SeungEun Kim

 

Integrating Service Learning into University Level Spanish Heritage Language Classes in the United States by Valeria Ochoa

 

A Career Exploration Course in Mandarin Chinese for Young Learners in East Asia by Reeya Zhao

 

Using Graphic Novels and Children’s Literature Books in U.S. 2nd year CFL University Courses by Yan Deng

 

Creative Writing in the Digital Age: A Course Design for Intermediate ELLs Majoring in English at an American University by Becky Lawrence

 

Using Podcasts to Teach Academic Listening for International Undergraduate Students through Metacognition: A Flipped Portfolio by Chris Meierotto

As a means of “paying forward” all of the help and support that we received from our professors, fellow classmates, and previous cohorts, the 2016-2017 cohort wrote up a short collection of thoughts and suggestions for future/prospective students regarding the final presentations:

How did it feel leading up to the presentations?

“I was able to learn a lot from the other presentations I saw. I learned how to make a good introduction to my project.” – Yan Deng

“It was definitely nerve wrecking at times. However, by this point in the program, I think us cohort members start viewing ourselves as a productive, contributing members of the field rather than students trying to play catch up, so I also viewed it as a chance to show what I could do as an educator.” – George Minchillo

“I felt great since it was a showcase of all my work, and I was happy to share my project with the cohort and faculty. It was a final milestone, and I tried to do my best for the audience to be interested and engaged in what I was presenting.” – Iryna Zagoruyko

How does it feel to know that you have the presentations behind you?

“I feel good because this was an opportunity to share what I have been engaged in for so long with the audience. After doing so many things during my time in LTS, I still felt supported when preparing for the presentations.” – Lin Zhu

“I feel free at last! However, I do think back to some parts of my presentation that I think could have gone better.” – Heidi Shi

“After doing the 2 year option and finally getting to the end of my final project and presentation, I feel exhilarated, excited, and exhausted! I’d been working on my project for a long time and it has morphed and evolved throughout my time in LTS. To present it in its final form in front of my peers, faculty, friends, and family was such an amazing feeling.” – Becky Lawrence

“It is always a bit sad to be done with anything in life. But, I feel that I did everything I could in my project, and hope very much that it could be useful in teaching mixed classes of Russian. I hope activities from my project will be implemented in the REEES curriculum here at the UO.” – Iryna Zagoruyko

What were the most difficult or the easiest parts of giving the presentations?

“I really tried to focus my presentation on entertaining the audience. I tried to leave out most of the minor details, and instead focus on showing the more ‘flashy’ parts of my project.” – Dan White

“The easiest part for me was making the draft of the slides, because I have so many things that I can pick and choose from my whole project to put in the presentation. The most difficult part was tackling audience questions, because some of them were unexpected!” – Lin Zhu

“The easiest part for me was actually having the chance to show my project! The hardest part was having a lot of information, and choosing which ones I should include in the presentation.” – Yan Deng

“For me, the most difficult part was having the confidence in the work I had done, and in portraying myself as an ‘expert’ in front of experts. The most useful part of the presentation was receiving additional feedback from peers and faculty that could be implemented in the final revisions of the project.” – George Minchillo

Any suggestions for future cohorts?

“For future cohorts, I would advise you to start thinking of project ideas early. Be creative, and try to combine your passions and interests with sound language teaching pedagogy. Take advantage of the built-in support of a cohort system, and ultimately just enjoy the process, because it will fly by before you know it!” – Becky Lawrence

“Prepare ahead of time, practice at least five times, and don’t make the slides too text-heavy! Be confident in yourself :)” – Heidi Shi

“Have confidence in the work you’ve done. You will undoubtedly be one of the most well-read and knowledgeable people about your context and materials in the room!” – George Minchillo

“Even though at this stage in the program, you will have completed 98% of your project. However, adequate time should be set aside to prepare for the presentation.” – Lin Zhu

“Enjoy the moment! Be nice to your cohort! They will be the greatest wealth in your academic life.” – Yan Deng

“Definitely be serious about your project! View it not only as an exercise, but strive to do everything possible to ‘break the ground’ in your field and context. Do not underestimate yourself – you have all the potential to create great activities/course designs for somebody to use in their teaching!” – Iryna Zagoruyko

A Fond Farewell

No matter where we go, and no matter what we do in the future, let’s always remember and think back to the knowledge, experience, and camaraderie we shared with one another as we grew into professional educators together. Even if we lose contact, or never find ourselves in a shared space again, we can always provide inspiration to one another to achieve our best, and to work hard to mold the world of academia as we see fit! For these reasons, I believe it is not necessary to say goodbye, but simply to say good luck to the 2016 – 2017 LTS cohort. I know we will all move on to do great things!

Thank you to my cohort members for all of their support! I hope to see you all again soon.
George Minchillo

“Die Grenzen meiner Sprache bedeuten die Grenzen meiner Welt. The limits of my language are the limits of my world.” – Ludwig Wittgenstein

August 11, 2017
by gkm
0 comments

Student Spotlight – Saba Alamoudi

Student Spotlight – Saba Alamoudi

Tell us about yourself! Where are you from? What kind of work have you done? Do you have any hobbies?

My name is Saba Alamoudi. I am from Mecca, Saudi Arabia. The holy city for Muslims and one of the oldest cities in the world.  It’s a crossroads and melting pot of many world cultures. People come to this city from many places around the world every year.

I was born in Makkah and lived in this city for my whole life, and I got my bachelor’s degree in Arabic literature from Umm Alqura University in the same city. After I graduated, I tried to find a job there related to my major, but I did not find anything. I decided to apply for a scholarship through the Saudi government to come to the U.S. I came to the U.S in 2012 and I started learning English. I was planning to teach Arabic as a second language and the LTS program was the perfect program for me to achieve this goal. Therefore, I decided to apply. I have tutored Arabic learners and lead the Arabic circle in the Mills International Center when I was an English learner in the AEI. I also was involved in many activities to introduce Arabic culture to American and international students through the Saudi and Muslim Students’ Association of the UO. After I enrolled to the LTS program, I got a job as a language instructor in Umm Alqura university in my hometown, which I will start after I graduate from the LTS program.

Could you tell us about any internships or GE positions you had at the UO?

I did an internship to work with Arabic instructors at the UO in some Arabic language classes that focused on teaching modern standard Arabic and the Egyptian  dialect.  It was a great experience for me. I learned from the teacher a lot of things related to teaching Arabic in an EFL context with students speak the same native language. I got the chance to teach in these classes and I learned a lot from the experience such as managing class time. One big challenge was to teach Arabic by speaking English in the classroom. For example, explaining many grammar rules or explaining vocabulary meaning using the English language. Arabic language classes in the UO helped me to realize the challenges that students face when they communicate and interact with native speakers. Arabic diglossia was the main challenge. The students were learning in most of their classes the Modern Standard Arabic which is used in very formal context such as academic context while native speakers use their own dialect to communicate with each other. The standard and the spoken languages are very different and it was hard for the students to understand native speakers when they speak. After spending some time helping students to realize the differences between the standard and the dialect, and after attending a Arabic class that focus on teaching the Egyptian dialect, I realized that the main difference is the pronunciation. That led to the focus on teaching pronunciation to clarify the problem of comprehensibility and intangibility in the communication between Arabic learner and native Arabic speakers.

Could you tell us a little bit about the ideas that you have for your Master’s project?

My Master’s project focuses on integrating teaching Pronunciation In Arabic curricula as a second language through some activities. I focus on both segmental and suprasegmental features for modern standard Arabic and the western Saudi dialect. My goal is to help students learn how to use what they’ve been learning in the modern standard Arabic language classes to interact and communicate with native speakers. Learning more about the differences in the the sound systems for both varieties of Arabic can help them avoid a lot of intelligibility and comprehensibility problems.

What is the most valuable thing that you’ve learned during your time at the UO?

Professors at the UO, especially the LTS program, have different teaching styles than most professors in my country. One main valuable thing that I learned is how a great teacher should be. Other valuable things that I learned and appreciated during my time in the program are the teacher and peer feedback in the classroom, the classroom discussions, the microteaching activities and practice that I have had during my learning journey. It helped me to apply and experience a lot of things that I learned theoretically in the program, and it helped to shape my teaching perspective and style. Finally, I learned that language is more than vocabulary and grammar rules. Also, culture is always associated with learning languages; therefore, including pragmatic, sociolinguistic and suprasegmental aspects is very important to teaching a language effectively.

July 28, 2017
by gkm
0 comments

Student Spotlight – Adam Li

Student Spotlight – Adam Li

Tell us about yourself! Where are you from? What kind of work have you done?

Hello, my name is Adam (天天). I come from a small city with over 2,500 years of history – Kaifeng, China.

Becoming a foreign language teacher has always been a dream I am enthusiastic about. Before coming to the US, I got my bachelor’s degree in Teaching Korean as a Foreign Language in South Korea. After graduation, I did different types of jobs including Chinese teacher in a Korean academy and liaison of international affairs in a Chinese college.

You are also completing a degree with the East Asian Languages and Literatures department. Can you tell us about what brought you to the LTS program?

I started my studies at the U of O in 2015, with my first major Korean Linguistics. Knowing that I have interests in language teaching, my advisor Professor Lucien Brown suggested me taking classes in the LTS program in order to fulfill my graduate requirements. However, what I learned from the first course – Curriculum and Teaching Material Development was way beyond my expectation. Realizing the tight connection between my first major department and LTS, I went on taking more courses in both programs. In summer 2016, with the help of the program director Professor Yerian, I got accepted by LTS as a concurrent degree student. Courses I took in the LTS program have strongly helped me to achieve my career goal. Those courses refreshed my mind with teaching methodologies, second language learning theories and other skills that I hadn’t thought about or been aware of.

Could you tell us a little bit about the ideas that you have for your Master’s project?

This summer, I am going to finish the draft of my Master’s Project for LTS. This research report shows evidence that what affects the judgement on accentedness of second language learners from Korean native speakers are the errors in applying “pitch pattern” of phrases.

Could you tell us about any internships or GE positions you’ve had at the UO? 

In addition to my studies, I am also enjoying a couple of opportunities to apply the skills I have learned from the classes. During weekdays, I teach beginner level Korean as a Graduate Teaching Fellow. The class consists not only American students but also a large portion of international students who are also interested in Korean language and culture. Every Friday afternoon, I meet kids in the Edison Elementary school for a Chinese Language and Culture Club. This after-school club offers Grade 3-5 kids the chance to experience very authentic Chinese culture as well as tons of fun games. In both classes I feel rewarded for seeing students loving the activities I design and the language and culture I share with them.

 

July 21, 2017
by gkm
0 comments

Student Spotlight – Iryna Zagoruyko

Student Spotlight – Iryna Zagoruyko

Tell us about yourself! Where are you from? What kind of work have you done? Do you have any hobbies?

My name is Iryna Zagoruyko and I am originally from Ukraine. I moved to the U.S. 5 years ago. I got my first Master’s degree in Business Administration in Ukraine. After graduation, I worked as a manager of foreign economic relations at the Korean International Company in the capital of Ukraine, Kyiv. Also, in Ukraine I worked as an Interpreter of English for foreign economic delegations. After I moved to the U.S., I worked as a student specialist in the ESL Department at Lane Community College in Eugene. After that, I did my second Master’s degree with the Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies Department at UO, simultaneously teaching first- and second-year Russian courses as a GE for two years (2014-2016). Being a Russian GE really changed my life goals: I understood that language teaching is my passion and decided to receive more knowledge on that. Now I am a graduate student at the LTS program of the Linguistics Department of the UO, and plan to receive my third Masters’ degree in language teaching this Summer.

This year was quite intense for me. Juggling being a graduate student in the intense LTS program, working at CASLS, and having a small baby (who was born three weeks after I started the LTS program) was quite a challenge. I did not manage to have a lot of free time for hobbies or interests and had to plan smartly to balance all aspects of my life. But every spare minute I have I try to spend with family: my baby and my husband. We really enjoy hiking together, going to the coast in Florence, and just being together at home.

Could you tell us more about your GE position at UO?

This year I was a graduate employee (GE) at CASLS (Center for Applied Second Language Studies) at UO. I worked on the Russian version of CASLS’ Bridging Project, a year-long hybrid course centered on exploring student identities. This project encourages students with high levels of proficiency, especially heritage students and those who graduate from immersion programs, to continue language study at the college level, which has become increasingly more challenging. CASLS is a great environment where people support and value each other. It was a big honor for me to work in such a highly-valued and highly-recognized National Foreign Language Resource Centers as CASLS. I truly believe that work which is done at CASLS will improve teaching and learning of world languages.

Could you tell us a little bit about the ideas that you have for your Master’s project?

My master’s project is called “Marching to Different Drummers: Differentiated Instruction for Teaching Mixed Classes of Heritage and Non-Heritage Learners of Russian with Motivation in Mind.” The motivation for this project is to offer language teachers access to the concepts of differentiated instruction, and strategies for applying it to their specific teaching context – mixed/homogeneous classes of heritage and non-heritage learners of Russian of novice to intermediate levels of proficiency.

What is the most valuable thing that you’ve learned during your time at the UO?

Probably, that we, LTS students, are all in a perfect place to gain very valuable knowledge on teaching which we can later apply in our lives. Professors in the LTS program possess extremely high levels of expertise in language teaching and offer us great support. Being a part of a single cohort of LTS students who are taking the same classes and doing the same projects together is really fun.

July 11, 2017
by LTSblog
0 comments

Alumni Spotlight Sarah Murphy

Sarah Murphy with graduates from her Informatica English class

Sarah Murphy graduated from LTS in 2015 and traveled straight to a position she found as an English Professor in Mexico. Her MA Project was ‘An Open Educational Resources Portfolio for Adult Education ESL’.

Where are you working now and what are you teaching?

I’m working at the Universidad de la Sierra Sur in the southern state of Oaxaca, Mexico. Mexican college students are required to complete a foreign language requirement in order to graduate, so I teach a variety of college level EFL classes.

What do you like best about what you do?

I love this job. It’s not without its challenges. Oaxaca is the poorest state in Mexico, and it can really be a hustle to make things work well. Having said that, I love my work. Our students come from tiny pueblos all over the state. More than 80% of them are first generation university attendees here on scholarship. It means a lot to me to work with these determined young people who are making this massive life change and socioeconomic leap. It’s just exciting to be a part of what they’re doing.

Additionally, the students bring me salsa made from flying ants, so my life is not dull.

What is something you learned while in LTS that you use in your teaching now?

Everything! I mean it. From writing exams to structuring classes and designing curriculum, I’ve used it all so far. I can’t think of any course that hasn’t been useful to me.

Maybe the most valuable skill I learned was how to grow a language learning course based on the needs of the learner (thank you, Keli!). Since entering the world of EFL, I’ve worked with many seasoned profs who were just never exposed to the process of designing courses based on a needs analysis or problematizing a context to exploit its specific advantages and tackle those inevitable obstacles. I am so grateful to have been trained in context-specific instruction and course design. It has informed every good decision I’ve made as a teacher.

Sarah with her enfermerfia English class graduates

Looking back, what advice would you give to current or future LTS students?

Well, I would say that you just never know what skills you’ll need to use in your future contexts, so absorb as much as you can.

I also think that transition from grad school to actual instruction can be a little awkward for some new teachers, so I can offer my perspective on being a newbie. There are no ideal contexts out there! New teachers can be really keen to affect positive change, and that’s as it should be. But listening and learning is also an important part of the first years of teaching (or just teaching in a new context). The LTS gives grads an amazing toolbox; teaching is about learning how to apply them well.

Don’t rush the process. Experiment and pay attention to what works for you and what doesn’t. Collaborate with other teachers and participate in observations as much as possible. I’m such a different teacher than I thought I’d be, and that’s a good thing!

July 7, 2017
by gkm
0 comments

Professional Development with the International Association for Language Learning Technology

Becky and Jeff at the banquet dinner and awards ceremony.

In addition to the many internship opportunities available to LTS students, there are also many opportunities for professional development in the field of language teaching! In March, several LTS students attended the 2017 TESOL Convention in Seattle, Washington, which was a great opportunity for them to learn new ideas from experienced teachers in the field. Becky Lawrence (2017 cohort) presented at TESOL Electronic Village, which was an amazing opportunity for her to share what she has been working on in the LTS program with other teachers.

Becky also accompanied LTS faculty and Yamada Language Center director, Jeff Magoto, to the biennial 2017 International Association for Language Learning Technology (IALLT) conference held at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota this past June. Jeff, also a longtime IALLT member, gave presentations about the Yamada Language Center and ANVILL. Becky gave a presentation about her MA project, which was great practice for the final MA presentations coming up in August.

Fun fact! The 2019 IALLT Conference will be held in our very own American English Institute at the University of Oregon, hosted by Jeff Magoto himself! Because technology in language teaching is such a crucial part of the LTS program, IALLT is a great organization for LTS students. They provide a lot of support and opportunities for graduate students and new teachers to present at conferences and publish in their journals. The IALLT organization is very warm and welcoming. Despite not knowing anyone besides Jeff upon arriving, Becky left the conference with many new friends!

For graduate students interested in attending IALLT conferences, IALLT also offers a $500 Ursula Williams Graduate Student Conference Grant to help pay for costs such as registration and housing. Becky was a recipient of this grant for the 2017 conference, and plans to stay involved in the organization to support graduate students in the future!

TESOL and IALLT are just two of the organizations that LTS students can become a part of, whether to attend, present, or publish.

To learn more about TESOL, visit http://www.tesol.org/

To learn more about IALLT, visit https://iallt.org/

Several of the graduate students who attended IALLT with Dr. Amanda Romjue (center), a 2015 Ursula Williams Grant recipient and current graduate student mentor.

Skip to toolbar