LTS

Language Teaching Studies Blog Site at the University of Oregon

September 29, 2017
by zachp
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Introducing the 2017-2018 LTS Cohort!

I am so thrilled to introduce you to the 2017-2018 LTS cohort!
As you will see below, we have a wonderful mix of backgrounds that all share a strong passion for teaching, learning, and exploring the world.

Alexis Busso (Oregon coast in a little town called Bandon): As an undergraduate, my focus in the International Studies department was cross cultural communication and education. This professional concentration sparked my interest in language learning and language teaching. I decided to join the LTS program because I have a huge love and passion for teaching and traveling. The LTS program will provide me with the skills and resources to teach students from a diversity of backgrounds. 

Brittany Parham (born and raised in Eugene, OR) I joined LTS in order to become a resource to better support the language revitalization efforts of the Sahaptin language, an indigenous language of the Columbia River spoken in Oregon and Washington. After I graduate, I plan to aid in language teacher training programs, as well as teach and advocate for the language at the University of Oregon.

Lee Joseph Huddleston (Eugene, OR): After serving in the Peace Corps for two years in Micronesia, I knew that I wanted to be a teacher. Through that experience I came to see teaching, especially teaching language, as a way of empowering others to bring about positive change in their lives and their communities through communication, the exchange of ideas and the expansion of consciousness and perspectives. I joined LTS to gain strong theoretical background knowledge and experience by collaborating with professions in my field. This Master’s degree combined with my passion for teaching will better allow me to excel in the competitive teaching market.

Logan (Bellevue WA by way of Bellingham, WA) After a fun and comfortable five years in Bellingham at Western Washington University getting my BA in Linguistics, I originally left undergrad thinking I would head straight into doctoral work in linguistics. However, after a lot of soul-searching (and a few deadlines missed on purpose) I decided to pursue my newly-discovered love of teaching. I looked at a few teacher-training MA programs, but nothing really clicked until I found the LTS program here at UO, which enabled me to explore teaching while catering to my love of language. I’m so happy and excited to be in this program with all these wonderful people that make up the cohort, the faculty, and everyone else. Big things in store for the future!

Ngan (Ngân) Ho Chi Minh City (or used-to-be Saigon), Vietnam. What attracted me to the program was that although LTS is an intensive program, it offers great flexibility in terms of the language that students are interested in teaching, choices of electives in different UO departments and many opportunities for internships so that students can gain hands-on experiences during the program.

Shayleen EagleSpeaker:  Wasco is my tribe and I am from the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs of Oregon. I am studying the Wasco language, Kiksht at UO as part of my LTS program. I came to the LTS program because I am really interested in linguistics and also because I have a passion for learning and teaching Indigenous languages, especially from my tribal heritage. The University of Oregon has a wonderful Northwest Indian Language Institute and they offer a lot of support for the learning and teaching of several Indigenous languages of Oregon, Washington, California and others. I would not have known about LTS if it were not for NILI and the outreach from NILI over 6 years ago when I was first introduced to their programming at Lane Community College when I found out about Chinuk Wawa language class. So I think it is really important to talk about how NILI has created this whole career path and made it possible for me and many others to study, teach and perpetuate Indigenous languages, especially because many of us may have not found another way to make it possible. I believe that learning languages in college has been a good fit for me, and there are other ways to learn, but in our modern society it is not that easy. So I’m really thankful for this part of higher education at the University of Oregon.

Yumiko Omata (Japan) The program offers me valuable opportunities such as specializing in teaching both English and Japanese and taking elective courses in East Asian linguistics and language pedagogy. Also, the possibility of gaining teaching practice at the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures would give me insight into JFL/JSL teacher education.

Yuxin Cheng (China) The reason why I joined LTS is because I was volunteering at a Chinese immersion school in Salt Lake City, Utah. Then I realized that I am interested in language teaching through my volunteer experience. So, I decided to switch my undergraduate major from Accounting to Linguistics. My favorite quote is from Harvard’s first female president Drew Gilpin Faust. She said, ” Don’t park 20 blocks from your destination because you think you will never find a space. Go where you want to be and then circle back to where you have to be”.

Zach Patrick-Riley (Anchorage, Alaska): I try to live my life by the mantra “Be the change you wish to see in the world” and this program helps me do just that. I absolutely love teaching… Seeing a student’s eyes light up when they learn something new is an indescribable feeling, and I am so happy to be pursuing a degree and profession that makes me be my best possible self, and helps others achieve their dreams. Not to mention I love traveling 😉

 

November 23, 2016
by gkm
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Student Spotlight: Dan White

10609432_10206962125785413_1985016490970727243_nTell us about yourself. Where are you from? Where have you worked? Any hobbies?

My name is Dan White, and I was born and raised in Portland, OR, USA. I definitely fall under the “nontraditional student” category. Out of high school, I worked random customer service jobs, until, one day I realized I was not living up to my potential. I decided, on a whim, to join the military. I joined the US Army as an ammunition specialist and shipped off to basic training in 2006. The Army had me all over the US as well as spending a year in Korea and nine months in Iraq. I finished my contract with the Army and started school at the University of Oregon in 2010. I received my BA in Linguistics in 2013.

I had applied for the LTS program for the fall of 2013, but I decided to pursue some work experience by heading off to Korea to teach English. This was my second stint in Korea, but my first was spent with the U.S. Army, so I did not really get a chance to fully enjoy my time. The second time, I focused on learning the language and culture and truly experiencing every part of Korea. I made lifelong friends, and started a new hobby that is now a major part of my life: solving Rubik’s Cubes competitively.   I started learning as a way to pass time, but I soon realized that I had an aptitude and passion for these puzzles. I incorporated them into my English classroom, and I used my after-school classes (where the curriculum was entirely up to me) to teach Rubik’s Cubes to my students. I used English to teach them how to solve the puzzle. This has become a vital part of my teaching methodology. I truly believe the best way to learn a language is not to focus on the language itself, but to focus on completing a task that is of particular interest to you. Then you are not learning the language simply to learn it, you are learning an entirely new skill and the language is simply the medium you are using to acquire that skill.

After three years in Korea, I recently came back to the United States in September of 2016, and I started in the LTS program in the Fall of 2016. I am still adapting to living in the United States again, and I am very excited to continue pursuing my education. I love teaching, and I want to do everything I can to become the best language teacher that I can.

You had an internship opportunity to work with students from Saint Gabriel’s College in Bangkok, Thailand. What was that like?

I had a wonderful opportunity to work with a group of high school students from Thailand. I could immediately tell that they were very special. I taught them over the course of two weeks. Rather than focusing on language courses, I taught them cultural courses. I had a lesson on comedy and a lesson on expectations vs. reality. Their trip culminated in a presentation to LTS students in Dr. Trish Pashby’s “Teaching Culture and Literature” class. Prior to the actual presentation, we had a practice presentation. The students did well, but I gave them a lot of feedback. Their English was fine, but they needed to work on their presentation skills. They primarily lacked in smooth transitions from speaker to speaker and visually-appealing slides. The difference between their practice presentations and the presentations given in class was night and day. I was so proud to see the way they took my advice to heart and poured everything they had into their presentations. It was one of the most rewarding experiences that I’ve had as a teacher.

Talk to us about working with the Fulbright Scholars.

Mixed in among our LTS students in various classes are some amazing minds from across the world. We are lucky enough to share our Literature and Culture class with four Fulbright Scholars. Fulbright Scholars work on special scholarships to study in the United States while also teaching their native language and culture. The four we have are from Kenya, Pakistan, Vietnam, and Thailand.

I had the opportunity to select some students for a lesson demonstration in my Multiliteracies course. I decided to invite all four of them, although I only needed to demonstrate my lesson for two students. All four showed up, and I taught them a lesson on American comedy. We discussed different comedy styles, I showed them various examples of American comedy. We also analyzed a specific comedy sketch, looking at various elements (camera angles, music changes, language choices) and discussed how they added to the comedic element of the video. Then they attempted to create their own comedic sketch.

The lesson was very challenging, but the Fulbright scholars were more than up for the task. I was very impressed with how patient and receptive they were to my lesson. I think teachers make very good students as they know the challenges that a fellow teacher faces, and I was definitely lucky to have them in my class. I also felt that they benefited a lot from this lesson as comedy is an extremely difficult topic to understand for second-language learners as there are both linguistic and cultural hurdles. Overall it was a great experience with them.

You’re also an intern with CASLS, right? What can you tell us about that?

I am currently working as an intern with the Games2Teach project of the CASLS (Center for Applied Second Language Studies) program. My job is to play commercial video games and assess how they can be used by language teachers to facilitate language learning. I look at both language and cultural aspects of these games that could benefit students. I assess the age appropriateness, language difficulty, and overall genre of the games. This experience has been very rewarding, as my master’s project will be focused on developing a language teaching game template that teachers can adapt to their lessons. I have found many elements from the games that I have tested that I would love to incorporate into my own game.

Last but not least, tell us about the Cubing Club!

The UO Cubing Club did not exist, so I decided to go through the steps to start it. Students need hobbies to pass the time, and cubing is a great one. I love teaching people how to solve the cube. I get to see the excitement on their faces when they are finally able to make the last turn that solves the cube. It is a lot like the joy I get in seeing my language-learning students progress. We also help people who can already solve to transition into competitive solving. They can learn larger cubes (4×4, 5×5, etc), or they can add new tricks to the normal 3×3 (blindfolded solving, one-handed solving, etc). Meeting with the club is a great stress reliever for me. I hope the club continues to grow throughout my time here at UO. If you are interested in joining, look up “UO Cubing Club” on OrgSync!

October 26, 2016
by gkm
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Student Spotlight: Yan Deng

Student Spotlight: Yan Deng

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  • Tell us about yourself! Where are you from? What did you do before joining the LTS program? Do you have any hobbies?

My name is Yan Deng and I come from Lanzhou, which is the capital city of northwest China’s Gansu province. The city is not very big, but there are still 2 million people who live there. My favorite food is Lanzhou beef noodles, which is a very famous food in China. Before I came to the U.S.A, I already got my bachelor’s degree at a Chinese university. My major was Chinese Education. I wanted to know about different cultures and to learn different languages, so I decided to study abroad. In 2011, I came to the University of Oregon, and my major was Educational Foundations. In class, I learned a lot about American teaching methods. Outside of class, I tried to learn more about American culture, such as how American students celebrate holidays, how they work on campus, and how they chat with their friends at cafes.

I have been in Eugene for 5 years. Eugene is a small, quiet and beautiful city, and I love living here. While I was an undergraduate student at UO, I volunteered at an American elementary school for two years. I noticed there were a lot of differences between American elementary schools and Chinese elementary schools. I have been a Chinese tutor for one-and-a-half years at UO, and I liked the job so I am still doing it now. I love to encourage American students to know more about China and to learn Chinese. I think we could all learn from each other.

Hobbies? I like swimming and reading. My favorite books are the Harry Potter series. Sometimes I like to watch American TV shows, such as CSI and Criminal Minds. To be honest, I get scared by some of the plots.

  • Tell us about Talking with Ducks. What is that experience like for you?

For me, I like the TWD class because I can learn a lot about teaching. The most important part is how the team members help each other. For example, I was a leader in week 2. I had to make sure my pronunciation was correct, and the rules of my game had to be clear. Since I am an international student, I have to worry about these things. To be honest, I wrote down every sentence of my lesson plan, and I read them to my team members, Devon and George. They helped me to edit my lesson plan. I was so glad they were so patient with me. No one loafs around on the job!

In Thursday’s class, when students came in , we didn’t feel nervous because we were ready. But there were still some situations that I hadn’t thought of before. Thus, we needed to help each other. For example, I didn’t realize students would still sit a big circle after I separated them into different groups. I didn’t know how to solve the problem, but George quickly jumped in and gave more explanation to solve the problem. When students were playing the game, I forgot to explain the game time limit, but Devon was on it. How about the other LTS Ducks? Yes, they all did very well. Sue and Maude were very creative in their groups, letting their group members use the envelopes (which were just materials from my activity) in the game. Joliene, Reeya and Juli built a great and comfortable environment for their group members to practice English. Laura, the professor of the TWD class, made sure everything was going very well. Because of this teamwork, I love the class and I enjoy every minute of it!

  • Tell us about the Chinese Club!

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The Chinese Club is held at the Edison Elementary School, and is one of the after school clubs. In our club, we have 11 students who come from different grades. The goal of the club is to encourage students to learn about Chinese culture as well as some simple Chinese characters. We tried to build a real language environment to help students learn Chinese. Last week, our topic was “daily life in Beijing.” We created some class activities to help students know the real Beijing, such as visiting the Summer Palace and the Forbidden City, and eating Beijing duck.

  • What are you most excited to learn or do in the LTS program?

I am so excited to learn a lot of different teaching methods in LTS program. We discuss issues in class, and we solve problems together. When I am studying in every class, I know I am coming closer step-by-step to my dream. Even though I have a very full schedule, I know my friends and I are always a team. I will be brave and I will keep swimming, just like Dory! Ha ha~

October 12, 2016
by gkm
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Student Spotlight: Devon Hughes

Student Spotlight: Devon Hughes

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Devon Hughes is a member of the 2016-2017 LTS cohort from Dunn, North Carolina. Before joining the MA program, Devon worked at a law firm in New York where she lives with her husband (when not in Eugene, of course). Her teaching experience prior to her move to Oregon includes a 2-year placement in Madrid, Spain where she worked for the Ministry of Education teaching English to elementary school students. Devon graduated from Davidson College in 2010 with a Bachelor’s in English.

  • Tell us about yourself! What do you like to do in your free time?

I spend my free time exploring wherever I am: FaceTiming with my husband back in New York, cooking, playing piano and singing, reading, learning how to weight-lift, and catching up on and writing for Misadventures Magazine, an adventure magazine by and for women. I recently wrote a poem (using what I studied in undergrad!) about adjusting to life in grad school so far away from home and loved ones. Feel free to check it out here.

  • Tell us about Women Teaching Women and future plans you may have.

After being out of school for 5 years and working a few jobs unrelated to TESOL, I started to become restless. I found myself daydreaming about teaching. When I envisioned my “ideal” classroom, I realized it was always the same: women of various language backgrounds learning English together in an engaging, warm, and intellectually stimulating environment. One day, I finally decided to see if such a school, institute, or company already existed where women taught other women English. So, as you do when you have a question, I googled it – “women teaching women English.” The first search result was a free downloadable textbook, created by the University of Oregon’s American English Institute (AEI) for the U.S. Department of State in collaboration with a non-profit in Lebanon whose primary aim is to empower Lebanese women. I appreciated how this non-profit viewed English education as just one of many tools for female empowerment. Months later, as I was narrowing down my graduate school search, I remembered the Women Teaching Women textbook and the University of Oregon, and I decided to apply to the LTS program.

What’s been really great about this program so far is how, almost immediately, I was able to research and write about my area of interest for my classes, connect with the professor who took the lead on the Women Teaching Women textbook project (Dr. Leslie Opp-Beckman), who in turn connected me with the director of the non-profit in Lebanon. I’ve only just begun my time here in Eugene, but I’m already being encouraged by the program faculty to ask questions, make connections, and get involved in the field. I can’t thank them enough for their support!

Short-term, I want to continue working the vision of my “ideal” classroom into the questions I explore in my research papers and the lesson plans I create, and hopefully that will aid me in my Master’s project. I have a hunch that it will be about the possible benefits of women teaching women English and what the opportunities in that specific classroom could be. Long-term, really, who knows? I look forward to seeing what opportunities may arise through my connections with the LTS program and the AEI, be it the chance to work on materials for the non-profit in Lebanon, going abroad to teach women English language learners, or looking into possible classroom models geared toward women here in the states.

  • You’re a GE (Graduate Employee) for the American English Institute 2016-2017 school year. What is that like?

Exhilarating! After being out of the TESOL classroom for 4 years, it’s great to be back and have a classroom full of English language learners! It’s a lot of work balancing teaching every day at the AEI with a full load of Master’s level classes, grading papers, lesson planning, homework. But it’s the work I want to do! I feel like having those years outside of the classroom gave me the energy I needed to dive right back in. Perhaps I’m in over my head, but I’m really thankful for the opportunity to work in the field I’m trying to get back into as a way to finance my education. What’s really cool is how, every day, what I’m covering in my LTS classes can be turned right back around and applied in my AEI Oral Skills class. Some of it is trial and error, but I think that’s necessary for any type of learning.

  • What are you most interested to learn or do in the LTS program?

I’m most excited to learn about how to be a “great” teacher. I’ve always studied my teachers, taking mental note of what makes them great in my opinion, so I’m curious to discover what are those elements for successful teaching, according to the research and practice in the field.

 
Video Blog Update!
We checked in with Devon to see what else she’s learned from participating as a GE for the AEI over the past few terms. Watch here to see how her experience has progressed until now!

 

 

 

 

September 28, 2016
by gkm
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Why should you join LTS?

Finished the first week of LT 528 Culture, Language, and Literature!

Finished the first week of LT 528 Culture, Language, and Literature!

Are you thinking about joining the LTS program (or currently looking for a Master’s program dedicated to language education and pedagogy) but aren’t quite sure about your motivations to take the graduate school plunge or wondering what you can expect out of such a program? In order to help prospective students understand what the LTS program is all about we asked current graduate students about their reasons for signing up to be a member of the LTS 2016-2017 cohort!

Why did you join the LTS program?

  • Suparada Eak-in (Thailand): “I am an English teacher in Thailand. I joined the LTS program because I wanted to gain more knowledge and experience about teaching, language and culture.”
  • Anh Duong (Vietnam): “I’m a Vietnamese FLTA. I joined the program because I am an English teacher in my home country, so I believe I will benefit a lot from the program developing my teaching skills and to know more about American education.”
  • Aska Okamoto (Tokyo, Japan): “I did the SLAT program when I was in undergrad and really liked it. I worked at a Japanese Immersion school for one year as an OPT and decided to come back as an LTS student because I want to research more about L2 teaching.”
  • Dan White (Portland, Oregon): “I became interested in language teaching while getting my undergrad in Linguistics. I taught English in Korea for 3 years, and I would like to get my Master’s to become a better language teacher.”
  • Kainat Shaikh (Pakistan): “I am an FLTA teaching the Urdu language at the Yamada Language Center. I am a Fulbright scholar and researcher. I joined LTS to experience American classes and to learn from the experience of the UO faculty. LTS will improve my English teaching methodologies and will bring light upon modern pedagogy.”
  • Iryna Zagoruyko (Ukraine): “I’m very fascinated with teaching after I’ve been teaching Russian for two years at the U of O.”
  • Becky Lawrence (Lafayette, Louisiana): “I originally joined LTS because it was a short program that would allow me to specialize in English teaching. However, I realized that there were many opportunities for me that I’m so grateful for. I got to meet others from many countries around the world, which has expanded my perspective greatly. I also extended my time another year so that I can do an internship in Japan for this term. Basically, the LTS program has everything I ever wanted in an MA program and more!”
  • Ruya Zhao (Beijing, China): “First, I’ve been dreaming of being a language teacher. Second, as an international student (as well as bilingual in English and Chinese), this program offers me many chances to practice and learn pedagogical theories.”
  • Juli Accurso (Ohio): “I joined the LTS program because it was the next ‘academic’ step that blended with my interests in language, linguistics and teaching that I discovered in undergrad!”
  • Sue Yoon (South Korea): “I really enjoyed taking LT courses as an undergraduate student here at UO, so I decided to join the LTS program and learn more about language teaching!”
  • Chris Meierotto (Denver, Colorado): “I felt that the program offered through the University of Oregon was more attractive than other teaching programs because of its focus on application, emphasis on technology, and its fundamental approach as a language teaching program rather than just an English program.”
  • Jiyoon Lee (Seoul, South Korea): “I liked the uniqueness of this program. I want to teach both Korean and English in the future, and this program allows me to focus on multiple languages. It’s great that I can take some elective classes from the EALL department as well.”
  • Yan Deng (China): “There are three reasons. First, when I was little, I wanted to be a language teacher. Second, LTS is a wonderful program and I could learn a lot from it. Third, there are a lot of people who come from different countries. Since I want to make new friends, I love the LTS program.”
  • Heidi Shi (China): “I’m currently a Ph.D student majoring in Chinese linguistics. The LTS program is my concurrent degree and the reason why I wanted to join was because it facilitates my research in Chinese pedagogy.”
  • Lin Zhu (China): “I realize that teaching one’s own native language is not as easy as I thought. So, the LTS program is really helpful for me to be a good language teacher.”
  • George Minchillo (Dallas, Texas): “After graduating from my undergraduate studies, I wanted to take some time to travel. When the English Program in Korea offered me the opportunity to travel and work at the same time teaching English, I couldn’t resist. After a year teaching in Korea, I decided to pursue a graduate program that would allow me to continue on this career path and the LTS program promised just that. I’ve seen the success of former students and couldn’t wait to join the cohort!”
  • Adam Li (China): “I was eager to learn more techniques in LTS and it’s also easy to get a concurrent degree with my EALL program.”
  • Valeria Ochoa (Las Vegas, Nevada): “I joined the LTS program to help others learn language efficiently and comfortably as well as to better understand how language acquisition works. I also want to be an awesome, well-prepared teacher.”
  • Irena Njenga (Kenya): “I want to learn how to integrate language and culture.”
  • Joliene Adams (Portland, Oregon): “I joined LTS because it’s more than your average TESOL program, because of a diversity of language teaching and potential languages one could teach that are offered within, and because of the job placement rate and satisfaction I found when researching graduates!”
  • Kunie Kellem (Japan): “I would like to learn the practical methodology for teaching students in Japan.”
  • Krystal Lyau (Taiwan): “I would like to become a language teacher, and help my students learn a second language without suffering.”
  • Devon Hughes (Dunn, North Carolina): “I joined the LTS program because it offered, on paper, the same courses as a M.A. in Education TESOL, with the added benefits of being housed in the linguistics department and the partnership with the AEI. I knew, with both of these aspects, I would be able to have a solid, theoretical linguistic foundation on which to build a career of application and practice in the TESOL classroom. The opportunity to be the AEI GE also made this program stand out from the rest. It’s rare to receive funding in the social sciences at the Master’s level. I’m thrilled to have work in the exact type of classroom I want to be in after graduation.”

Are you currently an undergraduate student who may be interested in joining the LTS program in the future? Or are you perhaps a graduate student who is interested in becoming a language teacher but are not sure another Master’s degree is what you’re looking for? We also asked students pursuing the Linguistics department’s SLAT certification (and taking classes together with the LTS cohort) about their interest in language teaching!

Why did you pursue the SLAT certification?

  • Maude Molesworth (San Francisco, California): “I joined the SLAT program because I am interested in teaching, and possibly teaching English abroad after I graduate.”
  • Jeremy Morse (Eugene, Oregon): “I think the knowledge and experience I can gain from the SLAT classes prepare me perfectly for what I want to do next: teaching English abroad.”
  • Teal Henshen (Springfield, Oregon): “I joined the SLAT program because I love languages and want to travel to teach.”
  • Russell Morgan (Los Angeles, California): “As a linguistics major it seemed like a good option to get a certificate while completing my upper division credits. I’d like to go overseas to teach and maybe come back for a Master’s.”

August 19, 2016
by megt
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Faculty Spotlight: Joana Jansen

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What is the nature of your work at the University of Oregon? 

I am the Associate Director of the Northwest Indian Language Institute (NILI) which is one of the research institutes and centers on campus. I am privileged to be able to support projects focused on revitalization and linguistic description of Native American languages, and students and community members working on these projects. In the part of the world that we now know as the state of Oregon, there were once 18-25 languages, many with multiple dialects. Most are not spoken today by elders who grew up speaking the language, but more and more are being spoken by language learners. There is so much interest in passion in returning the languages to daily use – it is inspiring!

My work at NILI is quite varied. There is not ‘typical’ day or week. I could be drafting a grant proposal, working on a research project with tribal partners, supervising GRFs to disseminate information and products via NILI’s website, meeting with Linguistics students, planning for NILI’s Summer Institute, and/or delivering online workshops and trainings to Native language teachers.

How are you associated with LTS?

I have worked with a number of LTS students, particularly those working on Native American language projects. Their work and ideas strengthen NILI. I have also been a reader for LTS Masters projects. I have not taught in LTS classes regularly, but this term I am teaching Linguistic Principles and Second Language Acquisition.

What is your favorite language of those that are taught at UO? 

The Ichishkíin language is spoken by elders of several tribes in Oregon and Washington. Most of the work I have done on documentation and curriculum has been focused on Ichishkíin – we’ve been teaching it at UO since Yakama Elder Virginia Beavert came here to get her PhD in 2007. LTS students and grads have been key to the class. In the early years of the class, LTS student Roger Jacob developed course materials and co-taught with me and Virginia. Now, LTS grad Regan Anderson is teaching it with Virginia, and other students are involved building and enhancing curriculum, which is shared with teachers at the tribes. The language is also taught at NILI Summer Institute and that brings together students and teachers of Ichishkiin from across the region, including UO students.

What do you enjoy most about working with language educators?

It’s a cliché but – I learn so much from the teachers I work with! Their love for their students is inspiring. Because I work in many different communities, I can facilitate connections between people and help to share ideas and inspiration.

You are teaching one of the first classes our cohort is taking – do you have any words of wisdom or advice for them as they continue in the program?

I’ve seen a lot of students grow in skills and confidence during the LTS program, and the relationships built in the cohort are really important. As a group, you hold a lot of knowledge: help and learn from one another. Also, even though you are in graduate school, take time for yourself and your family, keep a balance in your lives. Exercise, play, relax, go outside!

June 22, 2016
by Annelise Marshall
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MA Project Spotlight: Annelise

Annelise Marshall is a soon-to-be graduate of the LTS program, who will begin teaching in Mexico this fall.
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What is the title of your MA project?
Engaging International Students in the U.S. University Experience

Why did you choose this topic?
My experiences as an undergraduate gave me a passion for Student Life, and when I started getting to know some English learners at the U of O I started thinking about how beneficial involvement with the university environment can be. I wanted to see how I could help students increase their engagement to provide a more positive experience while at the U of O while also benefiting their language learning.

How will this project influence your future teaching?
I do hope to someday work with university level learners in the U.S., and I’ll certainly draw on this project then to provide a better learning experience, but I also hope to use elements of my project while teaching abroad, as I will be in the fall. I’ve been able to learn a lot about the use of authentic materials and pragmatics instruction that I think will be helpful in any teaching context.

What do you like best about your project?
I’ve been able to talk to a lot of students, teachers, and administrators who have reacted really positively to my topic. It’s really motivating to hear from others that they feel the need my project addresses.

June 1, 2016
by Annelise Marshall
0 comments

LTS: Eye of the Tiger

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The group after a good run at Amazon Park in South Eugene

LTS students have a lot on their plates—from working on MA projects to internships and GTFs. For a little stress relief, some LTSers have started a weekly running club, which has come to be known as the LTS Eye of the Tiger. Since January, Eye of the Tiger has met at least once a week.

While everyone goes at their own pace, Eye of the Tiger is a supportive space where everyone is encouraged to meet their own goals. LTS student Juli– arguably the founder of Eye of the Tiger– even crafts individual workouts for attendants!

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Some of the 5k runners after the race

Earlier this term, some Eye of the Tiger runners participated in races during the Eugene Marathon. 7 students ran the 5k, while 2 ran the half marathon. All together the LTS students ran a total of 47.9 miles!

Next term, many students plan to run the Butte to Butte, a local 10k which occurs every 4th of July.

 

Eye of the Tiger has also resulted in some special LTS merchandise. 13327488_1083406275052096_1801707673359109232_n13307497_839247680415_298908721876199184_n

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Juli opening her cowbell at the Prefontaine Classic

Finally, Eye of the Tiger members pitched in to buy a custom cow bell for Juli, for her future workout leading, and to thank her for work on the club. While Juli is a serious runner who has multiple races wins, she is always supportive of others, no matter where they are in their running (or walking) journey.

 

May 19, 2016
by Annelise Marshall
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3 Minute Thesis

Last Friday, Javid, an LTS student from Afghanistan presented at the U of O Grad School’s Three Minute Thesis, a competition where students from varying disciplines present their work in– you guessed it– three minutes. Here are Javid’s thoughts on the experience.

Throw Your O

What is your MA project about?

I started my presentation by asking the audience to imagine a situation where they had to write their thesis in a foreign language. Academic writing in our first language is already challenging let alone if we do it in a foreign language. Therefore, my MA project focuses on making academic writing an easier and a less frustrating process for undergraduate students in Afghanistan who are required to write their thesis in English. My project uses text-modeling and process writing as its framework to help students become more autonomous writers. The text-modeling approach helps students to use text features such as structure, organization, and style as a model for writing. In addition, process writing breaks down the process of writing into manageable pieces such as prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing before students publish their work. During this process, students also benefit from self-reflections, peer reviews, and portfolios, which help them to become more independent writers. They will also improve their research skills and strategies such as paraphrasing, summarizing, annotating, and citation. Research suggests that the combination of these two approaches is an effective framework for an academic writing course.

Why did you decide to present at 3MT?

As someone who has been involved in academic debates in Afghanistan and Toastmaster International here at UO, I always find any academic competitions interesting. I attended the 3MT presentation in 2015 and found it an interesting academic experience too. Not only my passion for academic experience was a motive, but also the opportunity to think deeply about my project. Moreover, it was a great practice to explain my research in a language understandable to the public.

How do you feel after presenting? Would you recommend the experience to other students? 

Throw Your O

The finalists

Presenting at 3MT competition enriched my academic experiences in the United States. It was quite a challenging process, from deciding what to include in one slide to my 3 minutes speech and connecting them together in a way that is engaging, simple and innovative. I did not expect to compete among the finalists. However, when I made it to the finals, I felt proud and accomplished after the presentation.

I definitely recommend to other students to participate in this educational presentation. You will learn many things about yourself, your project, and also about other fascinating research from various disciplines. It is an opportunity for you to develop your presentation skills and also receive feedback from the judges. Finally, the winners of the competition receive monetary prizes if you need some extrinsic motivation to present.

May 4, 2016
by Annelise Marshall
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LTS and CASLS

Many LTS students work with language learners in the Eugene area as interns, GTFs, volunteers, tutors, and more, but there is another unique opportunity you may not know about. The University of Oregon is home to the Center for Applied Second Language Studies (CASLS), one of just sixteen National Foreign Language Resource Centers which work to develop and share resources for language teaching and learning. Working with CASLS is an additional opportunity for LTS students and alumni.

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LTS and CASLS members recently participated in the 5k during the Eugene marathon. Although both groups had their own teams, they got together to take a photo before the race

Currently, LTS folks working with CASLS include: two LTS alumni who are current CASLS staff, two current students who are interns, and one current student who is a GTF. Additionally, Dr. Julie Sykes, the CASLS director regularly teaches an elective course for LTS students on pragmatics in language teaching.

To find out more about the kind of work that results from partnerships between CASLS and LTS, check out this blog post featuring the work of current LTS student and CASLS intern, Becky. Becky interned with CASLS from Summer Term 2015 to Winter Term 2016, and created an “interactive story” mobile app for language learners called Finders Keepers. 

For more information about using games in language teaching and learning, browse other posts on Games2Teach, which is run by LTS alum Ben!

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