LTS

Language Teaching Specialization Blog Site at the University of Oregon

October 26, 2016
by gkm
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Student Spotlight: Yan Deng

Student Spotlight: Yan Deng

deng-yan

  • Tell us about yourself! Where are you from? What did you do before joining the LTS program? Do you have any hobbies?

My name is Yan Deng and I come from Lanzhou, which is the capital city of northwest China’s Gansu province. The city is not very big, but there are still 2 million people who live there. My favorite food is Lanzhou beef noodles, which is a very famous food in China. Before I came to the U.S.A, I already got my bachelor’s degree at a Chinese university. My major was Chinese Education. I wanted to know about different cultures and to learn different languages, so I decided to study abroad. In 2011, I came to the University of Oregon, and my major was Educational Foundations. In class, I learned a lot about American teaching methods. Outside of class, I tried to learn more about American culture, such as how American students celebrate holidays, how they work on campus, and how they chat with their friends at cafes.

I have been in Eugene for 5 years. Eugene is a small, quiet and beautiful city, and I love living here. While I was an undergraduate student at UO, I volunteered at an American elementary school for two years. I noticed there were a lot of differences between American elementary schools and Chinese elementary schools. I have been a Chinese tutor for one-and-a-half years at UO, and I liked the job so I am still doing it now. I love to encourage American students to know more about China and to learn Chinese. I think we could all learn from each other.

Hobbies? I like swimming and reading. My favorite books are the Harry Potter series. Sometimes I like to watch American TV shows, such as CSI and Criminal Minds. To be honest, I get scared by some of the plots.

  • Tell us about Talking with Ducks. What is that experience like for you?

For me, I like the TWD class because I can learn a lot about teaching. The most important part is how the team members help each other. For example, I was a leader in week 2. I had to make sure my pronunciation was correct, and the rules of my game had to be clear. Since I am an international student, I have to worry about these things. To be honest, I wrote down every sentence of my lesson plan, and I read them to my team members, Devon and George. They helped me to edit my lesson plan. I was so glad they were so patient with me. No one loafs around on the job!

In Thursday’s class, when students came in , we didn’t feel nervous because we were ready. But there were still some situations that I hadn’t thought of before. Thus, we needed to help each other. For example, I didn’t realize students would still sit a big circle after I separated them into different groups. I didn’t know how to solve the problem, but George quickly jumped in and gave more explanation to solve the problem. When students were playing the game, I forgot to explain the game time limit, but Devon was on it. How about the other LTS Ducks? Yes, they all did very well. Sue and Maude were very creative in their groups, letting their group members use the envelopes (which were just materials from my activity) in the game. Joliene, Reeya and Juli built a great and comfortable environment for their group members to practice English. Laura, the professor of the TWD class, made sure everything was going very well. Because of this teamwork, I love the class and I enjoy every minute of it!

  • Tell us about the Chinese Club!

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The Chinese Club is held at the Edison Elementary School, and is one of the after school clubs. In our club, we have 11 students who come from different grades. The goal of the club is to encourage students to learn about Chinese culture as well as some simple Chinese characters. We tried to build a real language environment to help students learn Chinese. Last week, our topic was “daily life in Beijing.” We created some class activities to help students know the real Beijing, such as visiting the Summer Palace and the Forbidden City, and eating Beijing duck.

  • What are you most excited to learn or do in the LTS program?

I am so excited to learn a lot of different teaching methods in LTS program. We discuss issues in class, and we solve problems together. When I am studying in every class, I know I am coming closer step-by-step to my dream. Even though I have a very full schedule, I know my friends and I are always a team. I will be brave and I will keep swimming, just like Dory! Ha ha~

October 19, 2016
by LTSblog
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Collaborations: LTS and East Asian Languages and Literatures

The Language Teaching Specialization (LTS) within the Department of Linguistics and the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures (EALL) have made a short video highlighting the close connections among linguistics and pedagogy students in both departments. Thank you to the Graduate School for providing funding for this.

There are many ways that LTS and EALL students and faculty benefit from this relationship.

  • Graduate students can pursue concurrent MA degrees in both departments with reduced credit requirements due to some shared coursework
  • Students in either department can take elective coursework in the other department
  • Graduate students can include committee members from both departments on their MA projects
  • Students in either department can pursue a SLAT undergraduate or postgraduate certificate by taking specific coursework in both departments
  • Graduate students in LTS can sometimes find funded graduate teaching positions in EALL
  • Graduate students in LTS can find tutoring employment through EALL in the Chinese Flagship Program

These connections are not limited to LTS and EALL; LTS also shares coursework, teaching, internship, and MA Project advising opportunities through collaborations on campus with the American English Institute, the Center for Second Language, Romance Languages, the Yamada Language Center, German and Scandinavian, Russian and East European Studies, and the Northwest Indian Language Institute, as well as through collaborations with Lane Community College.

October 12, 2016
by gkm
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Student Spotlight: Devon Hughes

Student Spotlight: Devon Hughes

devon-duck

Devon Hughes is a member of the 2016-2017 LTS cohort from Dunn, North Carolina. Before joining the MA program, Devon worked at a law firm in New York where she lives with her husband (when not in Eugene, of course). Her teaching experience prior to her move to Oregon includes a 2-year placement in Madrid, Spain where she worked for the Ministry of Education teaching English to elementary school students. Devon graduated from Davidson College in 2010 with a Bachelor’s in English.

  • Tell us about yourself! What do you like to do in your free time?

I spend my free time exploring wherever I am: FaceTiming with my husband back in New York, cooking, playing piano and singing, reading, learning how to weight-lift, and catching up on and writing for Misadventures Magazine, an adventure magazine by and for women. I recently wrote a poem (using what I studied in undergrad!) about adjusting to life in grad school so far away from home and loved ones. Feel free to check it out here.

  • Tell us about Women Teaching Women and future plans you may have.

After being out of school for 5 years and working a few jobs unrelated to TESOL, I started to become restless. I found myself daydreaming about teaching. When I envisioned my “ideal” classroom, I realized it was always the same: women of various language backgrounds learning English together in an engaging, warm, and intellectually stimulating environment. One day, I finally decided to see if such a school, institute, or company already existed where women taught other women English. So, as you do when you have a question, I googled it – “women teaching women English.” The first search result was a free downloadable textbook, created by the University of Oregon’s American English Institute (AEI) for the U.S. Department of State in collaboration with a non-profit in Lebanon whose primary aim is to empower Lebanese women. I appreciated how this non-profit viewed English education as just one of many tools for female empowerment. Months later, as I was narrowing down my graduate school search, I remembered the Women Teaching Women textbook and the University of Oregon, and I decided to apply to the LTS program.

What’s been really great about this program so far is how, almost immediately, I was able to research and write about my area of interest for my classes, connect with the professor who took the lead on the Women Teaching Women textbook project (Dr. Leslie Opp-Beckman), who in turn connected me with the director of the non-profit in Lebanon. I’ve only just begun my time here in Eugene, but I’m already being encouraged by the program faculty to ask questions, make connections, and get involved in the field. I can’t thank them enough for their support!

Short-term, I want to continue working the vision of my “ideal” classroom into the questions I explore in my research papers and the lesson plans I create, and hopefully that will aid me in my Master’s project. I have a hunch that it will be about the possible benefits of women teaching women English and what the opportunities in that specific classroom could be. Long-term, really, who knows? I look forward to seeing what opportunities may arise through my connections with the LTS program and the AEI, be it the chance to work on materials for the non-profit in Lebanon, going abroad to teach women English language learners, or looking into possible classroom models geared toward women here in the states.

  • You’re a GE (Graduate Employee) for the American English Institute 2016-2017 school year. What is that like?

Exhilarating! After being out of the TESOL classroom for 4 years, it’s great to be back and have a classroom full of English language learners! It’s a lot of work balancing teaching every day at the AEI with a full load of Master’s level classes, grading papers, lesson planning, homework. But it’s the work I want to do! I feel like having those years outside of the classroom gave me the energy I needed to dive right back in. Perhaps I’m in over my head, but I’m really thankful for the opportunity to work in the field I’m trying to get back into as a way to finance my education. What’s really cool is how, every day, what I’m covering in my LTS classes can be turned right back around and applied in my AEI Oral Skills class. Some of it is trial and error, but I think that’s necessary for any type of learning.

  • What are you most interested to learn or do in the LTS program?

I’m most excited to learn about how to be a “great” teacher. I’ve always studied my teachers, taking mental note of what makes them great in my opinion, so I’m curious to discover what are those elements for successful teaching, according to the research and practice in the field.

 
Video Blog Update!
We checked in with Devon to see what else she’s learned from participating as a GE for the AEI over the past few terms. Watch here to see how her experience has progressed until now!

 

 

 

 

October 5, 2016
by LTSblog
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Faculty spotlight: Kaori Idemaru

idemaru

What is your position at UO?

I am Associate Professor of Japanese Linguistics in East Asian Languages and Literatures (EALL).  But my research and teaching cover other languages, including Korean and English.

How are you connected to LTS and LTS students?

My department and LTS often share students in various ways.  We have many concurrent degree students who are pursuing both Linguistic and EALL degrees.  I also send my students to take LTS courses, and LTS students take my courses.  Also one of LTS graduates, Yukari Furikado-Koranda, is now a colleague of mine in my department!  It’s wonderful to work with her. You can see more about the collaboration between EALL and LTS here.

What is a current research project you are working on?

I am working on a project that looks at characteristics and constraints of speech learning, and another that looks at how people use voice to sound polite.

What do you enjoy most about working with graduate students?

I really enjoy working with grad students discussing and designing interesting and innovative research methods to address their research questions.

 

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