Amir Nezamdoost – SLL Young Lighter of the Year and Richard Kelley Grant

Amir Nezamdoost, UO Architecture PhD and ESBL graduate research fellow, was selected as a finalist for the prestigious SLL Young Lighter of the Year 2017 competition. Nezamdoost is one of three young researchers shortlisted for the international award – the finalists’ presentations and announcement of the winner to follow at the LUX Awards at ExCel in London in November.

For more information on the competition: SLL Young Lighter 2017

 

Additionally, Nezamdoost received the Richard Kelley Grant for 2016 – an award established by the New York Section

of the Illuminating Engineering Society in 1980. “The purpose is to recognize and encourage creative thought and activity in the use of light. Award(s) are granted to the person(s) who preserve and carry forth Richard Kelly’s ideals, enthusiasm and reverence for light.” – IESNYC

For more information on the Richard Kelly Grant: IESNYC

Congratulations to Amir for success in his lighting research!

 

Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg Launches Campus Impact Course

ESBL director Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg has launched a course through University of Oregon Allied Arts and Architecture entitled “Campus Impact: Comfort + Energy.” This course, open to both graduate and undergraduate students, offers the unique opportunity to collaborate with staff from the University of Oregon Campus Planning Design and Construction in a number of projects to improve the level of building performance and human comfort on campus.

“The University of Oregon Campus Planning and Facilities Management (UO Facilities) staff has agreed to support this class through substantive investment of human resources.  Together withUO Facilities, we have developed a suite of project categories and defined specific projects forstudent team analysis.  The focus will be placed on the studentbased team research and detailed analysis and evaluation of the sustainable design systems and building performance in quantitative terms; and qualitatively through interviews, transcriptions, and comfort questionnaires. We will submit our work to peer reviewed journals and conference proceedings and will present our results and manuscripts to UO Facilities.”

-Van Dem Wymelenberg

 

Mhuireach Awarded A&AA Dissertation Fellowship 2017-2018

Congratulations to Gwynne Mhuireach for winning a Dissertation Fellowship from the School of Architecture & Allied Arts at the University of Oregon!  Her working dissertation title is: Toward a Mechanistic Understanding of Relationships Between Airborne Microbial Communities and Urban Vegetation: Implications for Urban Planning and Human Well-being.  Mhuireach holds an M.Architecture (2012) from the University of Oregon and a B.S. in Biology (Ecology and Evolution Track, 1999) form the University of Washington. She is presently a Graduate Research Fellow at the Energy Studies in Buildings Laboratory and BioBE Center at University of Oregon.  Her anticipated graduation is June 2018.

Recent publication: Urban greenness influences airborne bacterial community composition

Dissertation Abstract: Variation in exposure to environmental microbial communities has been implicated in the etiology of allergies, asthma and other immune-related disorders. In particular, exposure to a high diversity of microbes during early life, for example through living in highly vegetated environments like farms or forests, may have specific health benefits, including immune system development and stimulation. In the face of rapidly growing cities and potential reductions in urban green space, it is vital to clarify whether and how microbial community composition is related to vegetation. The purpose of my proposed research is to identify plausible but under-explored mechanisms through which urban vegetation may influence public health. Specifically, I am investigating how airborne microbial communities vary with the amount, structural diversity, and/or species composition of green space for 50 sites in Eugene, Oregon. My approach combines geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing data with passive air sampling and culture-independent microbial sequencing.

Committee members:

  • Dr. Bart Johnson, Professor of Landscape Architecture (Major Advisor & Committee Chair)
  • Dr. Jessica Green, Professor of Biology (Co-Advisor)
  • Roxi Thoren, Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture (Core Member)
  • Dr. Deb Johnson-Shelton, Education/Health Researcher, Oregon Research Institute (Core Member)
  • G.Z. Brown, Professor of Architecture (Institutional Representative)