Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg receives NEEA Award for Innovation

The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) Board of Directors awarded Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg the Leadership in Energy Efficiency Award for Innovation. Kevin was nominated for his work in daylighting design research, education, and engagement—work that represents many collaborations over almost two decades, and for which Kevin extends his gratitude to many great colleagues.

“Our work in the field of daylight design is first and foremost about creating high quality indoor environments for people to live, work, and play within. The fact that the energy efficiency community, that is often focused on energy savings, has recognized this work as innovative is very rewarding. It is so important to balance energy priorities with human experiential priorities, and I believe there is value in explore the synergy among these two goals.”

While accepting the award, Kevin acknowledged NEEA’s unique impact and global reach, attributing his own success in part to the organization’s generosity. NEEA supported Kevin during his graduate studies at the University of Washington, and he has worked alongside the organization for nearly two decades, while at the University of Idaho and University of Oregon. He expresses his deep gratitude for NEEA’s continuous support of students in this area of study in the ESBL at University of Oregon. Thank you to NEEA for this prestigious award, and congratulations to Kevin for his accomplishments!

For more information on the award, view the press release on NEEA.org.

Amir Nezamdoost – SLL Young Lighter of the Year and Richard Kelley Grant

Amir Nezamdoost, UO Architecture PhD and ESBL graduate research fellow, was selected as a finalist for the prestigious SLL Young Lighter of the Year 2017 competition. Nezamdoost is one of three young researchers shortlisted for the international award – the finalists’ presentations and announcement of the winner to follow at the LUX Awards at ExCel in London in November.

For more information on the competition: SLL Young Lighter 2017

 

Additionally, Nezamdoost received the Richard Kelley Grant for 2016 – an award established by the New York Section

of the Illuminating Engineering Society in 1980. “The purpose is to recognize and encourage creative thought and activity in the use of light. Award(s) are granted to the person(s) who preserve and carry forth Richard Kelly’s ideals, enthusiasm and reverence for light.” – IESNYC

For more information on the Richard Kelly Grant: IESNYC

Congratulations to Amir for success in his lighting research!

 

Dristi Manandhar responds to Nepal Earthquake

Dristi Manandhar is a second-year graduate architecture student at University of Oregon who has been working at the Energy Studies in Buildings Laboratory. But her inspiring story goes far beyond her experiences in the classroom.

On April 25, 2015, Manandhar was with her family at home in Kathmandu, Nepal when a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck. Manandhar was fortunate to lead her parents and younger sister to safety outside. The earthquake resulted in more than 8,000 dead, 21,000 injured, 40 percent of the country’s infrastructure damaged and nearly 505,000 homes destroyed. Manandhar was fortunate to remain safe with her family and see her home only moderately damaged, despite the disastrous effects of the earthquake.

In response to the devastation around her, Manandhar joined the Nepal Engineering Association to assess more than 300 homes’ safety and structural integrity. Dismayed by how helpless she felt telling people that their homes were no longer safe, Manandhar changed her approach. She and six architecture alumni from her university joined forces to design an emergency shelter, using the name Aashraya, Sanskrit for shelter.

The Aashraya team with a finished emergency shelter

The team quickly designed with a dome-like shelter inspired by Eli Kretzmann’s Pakistan flood relief shelters. Aashraya shared the plans and was able to help create over 2,300 shelters in 45 days across Nepal. The domes are both economical and resilient to Nepal’s harsh weather conditions.

At University of Oregon, Manandhar has become the first Nepal Scholarship recipient and a member of the International Cultural Service Program, an international student group that connects students from around the world with community events and engagement opportunities. As a graduate architecture student, she has been researching sustainable design, particularly passive heating and cooling methods in buildings at the Energy Studies in Buildings Laboratory.

After the past two years away, Manandhar will graduate from the UO in Spring 2017 and plans to return home to pick up where she left off.

Read the full story by Chakris Kussalanant.