Tag Archives: file

Link & File: WCET, OLC, and UPCEA Partner on Higher Ed Act for the 21st Century Learner

Three key organizations in the field of online learning have partnered together to produce a two-page handout that summarizes emerging issues, in the hopes that those concerns can be addressed in the upcoming reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. This partnership hopes to create “a unified voice on pending federal regulations for today’s higher education students.”

Read more on the WCET blog, or view the handout below.

File: 7 Things You Should Know About The Evolution of the Transcript

A comprehensive overview of recent efforts to transcript digital badges, competencies, internships, and other non-traditional sources of educational experience.

Efforts are under way to capture a broader range of learning experiences and create frameworks to curate them, providing a more holistic view of student learning.

File: Stories from Students in Their First Semester of Distance Learning

This unique study used video diaries to collect data on student experiences as first-term distance learners.

Learner stories reveal many shades of grey to the “soft factors” of what it means to be a distance learner and provide a unique insight into the complexity of studying from a distance.

File: Educational Technology and Faculty Development in Higher Education

This report looks across EDUCAUSE Core Data Service (CDS) and ECAR resources to tell the story about how faculty use technology, how students experience technology, and how institutional practices support educational technology. Together, the findings from these sources provide a three-dimensional perspective for how technologies in the teaching and learning environment are used by faculty, consumed by students, and supported by institutions.

Dahlstrom, Eden (2015). Educational Technology and Faculty Development in Higher Education. EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research, EDUCAUSE.

File: 7 Things You Should Read About Copyright in Online Education: Perspectives and Models

A collection of key resources and documents on copyright concerns vis-a-vis online courses. Includes a contribution from UO’s Andrew Bonamici. A useful companion piece that supports local efforts to assist faculty with this topic.

The resources in this issue explore the changing landscape of copyright in academic settings, with particular attention to the role that technology plays in the use of intellectual property in higher education.

Diaz, Attardo, Bonamici, Eke, Guevara, Hoas, McDaniel, O’Neill, and Stoute (2015). 7 Things You Should Read About Copyright in Online Education: Perspectives and Models. EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative, EDUCAUSE.

File: 7 Things You Should Know About Leading Academic Transformation

A summary of the areas of highest relevance for administrators interested in expanding their institution’s academic profile in ways that are both intellectually innovative and fiscally responsible.

Many factors are involved in leading academic transformation, including a focus on stakeholder-centered design, relevance of credentials, and the strategic use of technology. Academic transformation has the potential to restore higher education’s sustainability and bring renewed levels of excellence and student achievement.

Morris & Smith (2015). 7 Things You Should Know About Leading Academic Transformation. EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative, EDUCAUSE.

File: Against the Natural Order of Things: Why E-Learning Refuses to Take Off

A well-written and comprehensive overview of the pitfalls of advocating for technological change without due consideration of faculty expertise. Highly recommended.

This helps to explain why many predictions of the future fail: not because the technology itself will not materialize, but because the people doing the predictions are not experts in the situations or domains they are aiming to affect. They develop tools without watching the way people work. This is why their visions strike us as funny, odd, or even offensive. And it’s why, when a technologist tries to tell a designer, a doctor, or a teacher “you will work like this in the future,” they laugh.

Baldwin, Jonathan. “‘Against the Natural Order of Things’: Why E-Learning Refuses to Take Off.” In Centennial Conversations: Essential Essays in Professional, Continuing, and Online Education. UPCEA, 2015.

Infographic: Student Mobile Workspaces

A visual overview of student reliance on mobile devices versus institutional and faculty priorities for learning.

94% of higher education leaders agree that students should have access to applications and data anywhere, on any device, but 55% said their institution does not provide this level of access to students today.

Link/File: ECAR Study of Faculty and IT (2015)

The second annual Study of Faculty and Information Technology (2015) has been released by the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research. Customized results for UO are also available.

Interestingly, faculty in this study believe that IT may not have the funding or capacity to manage change as well as it could, suggesting potential for powerful, combined advocacy for appropriate technology investment. e greatest value of a study like this is not the conclusions it reaches but the campus conversations it begins.

LINK/FILE: A Different Vision of the Bachelor’s Degree

Op ed blog post commending a November 2015 report from New America entitled “Flipping the Paradigm: Why We Need Training-Based Pathways to the Bachelor’s Degree and How to Build Them” which advocates “flipping” the bachelor’s degree path to “start with applications and work upwards towards theories.”

We build degrees that move from the broad and general at the beginning — the theory, the survey — to the specific at the end. That structure pretty much guarantees that initial encounters with large and sweeping theories will be shallow at best, since they lack both context and a sense of why they matter. By the time students get to specifics, they’ve left the big questions behind. If they return to the big questions later, it’s despite, rather than because of, the way we’ve organized degrees. They rarely get the benefit of coming back to the big questions with the benefit of context, and that’s our failure.

Download the PDF of “Flipping the Paradigm: Why We Need Training-Based Pathways to the Bachelor’s Degree and How to Build Them” by Mary Alice McCarthy. November 2015.

Matt Reed. A Different Vision of the Bachelor’s Degree. Inside Higher Ed. November 12, 2015.