Category: Events

Design Movie Night Tonight 7-9 PM in LA 279

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STAnDD (Supporting the Advancement of Diversity in Design) is excited to announce that we are hosting a design movie night tonight (Wednesday, May 17) from 7 pm to 9 pm in Lawrence Hall, room 279! Open doors at 6:30 pm.

We are inviting students from all AA&A majors, faculty, and local design professionals to this end-of-the-year social.

Come join us in a screening of Temple Grandinfree pizza from Falling Sky (including vegan and gluten-free from Sizzle Pie; while supplies last), and casual discussions about themes of the movie relating to design thinking and fields today with University of Oregon’s design community!

Southern Willamette Valley Natural Areas Through the Seasons

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The Eugene Natural History Society

and

Native Plant Society of Oregon, Emerald Chapter

present a free program: 

Southern Willamette Valley Natural Areas

Through the Seasons

Ed Alverson

Natural Areas Coordinator, Lane County Parks

Alverson wanted to see familiar landscapes from a different perspective, to expand the time scale, since different elements of the landscape operate on

different time scales. He took weekly photos of a dozen or more scenes of a particular site for an entire year, choosing a different site each year over ten years. His presentation of landscape changes at the rate of two seconds a week can change our conception of the passage of time.

Friday,  May 19,  2017

7:30 p.m., Room 100 Willamette Hall, UO Campus 

Co-sponsored by  the UO Science Library

Contact: Tom Titus  541-510-2500

http://pages.uoregon.edu/enhs

Undergraduate Research Symposium — Thursday, May 18

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I wish to invite you to the 7th annual Undergraduate Symposium, which will take place on Thursday, May 18 in the EMU. The Undergraduate Symposium debuted in 2011 with 69 presenters and 40 faculty mentors spanning 20 majors and four colleges, and in its seventh year has grown to 292 presenters and 177 faculty mentors spanning 60 majors and eight colleges!

Concurrent Oral Presentation Panels run from 10:00am-3:15pm, Creative Works Sessions from 3:30-5:00pm, and the Poster Session and ARC/FIG Sessions from 5:15-7:00pm. 

A catered reception will begin at 5:00pm in the EMU Ballroom Lobby with welcome remarks by the organizers and a brief keynote address by Benjamín Aleman, Assistant Professor of Physics. The reception offers a great opportunity to mingle and interact directly with student presenters.

The Symposium concludes at 7:00pm with the announcement of the award winners (with six different awards offered) and the presenter group portrait.

The full agenda, venue map, official program, and additional information are available at the Undergraduate Symposium website: http://undergradsymposium.uoregon.edu/

Together, let us celebrate the extraordinary research, creativity, and ingenuity of our undergraduates.

Together, let us celebrate the extraordinary research, creativity, and ingenuity of our undergraduates.

Opening May 20 | Dannielle Tegeder: TURBULENT CONSTELLATIONS

Carrie Secrist Gallery is happy to announce our first solo exhibition with gallery artist Dannielle Tegeder:
Dannielle Tegeder | TURBULENT CONSTELLATIONS
Opening reception: Saturday, May 20 from 5 to 8 PM
Exhibition dates:
May 20 – July 1, 2017 
Dannielle Tegeder’s newest body of work expands on her ever-evolving exploration of the systems that surround us. This exhibition presents a monumental mobile, an installation of over 70 works on paper, a series of large-scale drawings, video animations and sound. As a full body of work, oriented within the gallery space to encourage exploration and interpretation, the integration of formal concepts such as architecture and urban planning manifest through abstraction.
Encompassing the language of painting in the expanded field, Dannielle Tegeder’s artwork reconstitutes what painting means as a formal exercise in mark making by allocating particular strategies to the medium of drawing. The notion of “Drawing” then becomes delineated by introducing installation methods that further disrupt media-specific hierarchies: drawing to sculpture to installation to video to sound and back to drawing. Expanding and contracting these constructs, with the idea of drawing as a baseline, emboldens the interconnectedness between line, shape and color. Thus: drawing as sculpture as installation as video as sound.
SPECIAL EVENT
Matthew Evan Taylor
Saturday, June 24, 2017 at 4PM at Carrie Secrist Gallery
Composer and saxophonist Matthew Evan Taylor will present a site-specific performance in collaboration with Dannielle Tegeder on the occasion of TURBULENT CONSTELLATIONS. Taylor and Tegeder will also talk about their ongoing collaboration, this project and the history of sound and abstraction.
 
This event will be free and open to the public. 

Conference and plenary talk in honor of Judith Baskin 5/23-5/24

Conference

May 23rd, 9:00-3:30, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

May 24th, 9:00-3:30, Knight Library Browsing Room

Plenary Talk and Dessert Reception

“Distinguishing Egg White From Semen:

Rabbinic Forensics and the Medieval Afterlives of a Talmudic Passage”

A Plenary Talk By Dr. Judith Baskin,

Knight Professor for Humanities in the College of Arts and Sciences

May 24th

7:30pm

Ford Alumni Ballroom

Dessert reception to follow

You’re Invited! ShelterCare art event on campus

There’s a lively event happening on campus Thursday, May 18 that celebrates fine art and the strength of community, and I wanted share the information with your department.

Expressions: An Art Benefit for ShelterCare is an annual event held at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art.

Come and celebrate community and giving with:

  • A silent auction of exquisite local art;
  • Music by Manouche Noir;
  • Enticing raffle prizes;
  • Decadent hors d’oeuvres and refreshing drinks;
  • Live artist demonstration by Sarah Sedwick and Heather Halpern.

Proceeds will provide housing and services for community members who are homeless or on the verge of homelessness.

Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door.

Details and ticket information is available on the Facebook event page and on our website at sheltercare.org/expressions.

I hope you can join us!

Associate Professor of Art Ron Jude will launch a new book entitled “Nausea” in London on May 19th.

Associate Professor of Art Ron Jude will launch a new book entitled “Nausea”
in London on May 19th. He will be signing books in the bookshop at The
Photographers’ Gallery at 5:00 pm, followed by a conversation with curator
and writer David Chandler at 6:30 pm. “Nausea” is Jude’s third book with
London-based publisher MACK.
“Nausea”—taken from the title of Sartre’s 1938 existential novel—is a
body of photographs that registers the interiors of public schools in Baton
Rouge, Louisiana and Atlanta, Georgia. Departing from mere documentation,
however, Ron Jude lures us into peering through windows, doorways and
crevices of walls into empty classrooms and corridors, as we become
increasingly conscious of the perils of our own gaze.
David Chandler is a writer, editor and curator in the fields of contemporary
photography, photographic history and the visual arts and is currently
Professor of Photography at the School of Art, Design and Architecture,
Plymouth University. He was curator at The Photographers’ Gallery from 1988
to 1995.
The Book Signing is free, the talk requires booking. £8/£5 Members &
Concessions.
The Photographers’ Gallery, 16 – 18 Ramillies St, London W1F 7LW
+44 (020) 7087 9300
There will be two additional book signings with Ron Jude on Saturday, May
20th at Photo London and Offprint London.
http://thephotographersgallery.org.uk/ron-jude-nausea

“Soft Structure” Fiber area weaving exhibition at EMU Adell McMillan

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Soft Structures
Erb Memorial Union Adell McMillian Gallery*
April 27 – June 5
Nilufar Amali // Lydia Bales // Keisha Cabudol // Alli Calhoun // Irene
Chau // Izzy Cho // Desi Colley // Haley Duhaime // Hector Escobar //
Linda Guo // Katey Harris // Sophie Jackman // Masaru Kiyota // Anna
Post // Tasha Proudfoot // Skye Sinclair // Emily Stark // Amelia
Thompson // Sam Wrigglesworth
“Soft Structures” is an exhibition of experimental and advanced weaving
work created by students enrolled in the Fiber area Winter 2017 courses
“Introduction to Fiber” and “Woven Structures.” From soft sculptural
forms and studies in color and smell, to designed objects, blankets and
yardage samples, “Soft Structures” looks simultaneously at the breadth
and depth weaving offers to students of all levels and backgrounds. The
exhibition is organized in partnership with Marissa Lee Benedict
(Instructor, Fiber & Sculpture, University of Oregon) and supported by
Jovencio de la Paz (Assistant Professor, Curricular Head of Fibers,
Department of Art). Special thanks to Suzanne Hanlon and the Visual Arts
Board for their exhibition assistance and expertise.
*Located on Floor 2 of the EMU, near the ballroom. Listed as “McMillan
Gallery” in elevator directory.

Opening Reception | Friday, May 5, 6 – 8:00 P.M.

We have found ourselves facing a sobering reality of the fragile and
threatened support for the arts. As institutional directions are frequently
changing and budgets continually diminished, the very foundations of creative
venues and organizations have become easy prey. Institutional, community and
civic priorities are expressed – or dismissed – through financial
referendums. Currently, this is a global, national, and ultimately local
truth.
Functionally United will serve as the final curated exhibition for White Box.
On July 1, following the University of Oregon Art and Technology graduating
exhibition the doors will close for the last time. An important and
influential chapter for the Northwest’s arts community will officially come
to an end.
This final line-up of exhibiting artists is a testament to the impact, depth,
and reach White Box has had locally, across Oregon, and nationally. This is
not an exhibition where the spacious, room-to-breath aesthetic of displaying
work will be implemented, but rather will be a wall-to-wall, floor-to-ceiling
collection of incredible talent. A group that formed out of solidarity for
one of Portland’s iconic art venues, many have previously exhibited in the
gallery and all have experienced, influenced and provoked White Box in some
degree.
White Box at the University of Oregon in Portland has served as a visual
laboratory invested in the exploration and presentation of contemporary
critical inquiry in the visual arts since 2010. Located in the historic White
Stag Block in Portland’s Old Town Chinatown neighborhood, White Box has a
vibrant history of bringing together artists, students, faculty, and regional
and global communities to research and present contemporary issues in art and
design. This history and collection of exhibitions cannot be properly
represented in a statement. But, I am hopeful it will serve as a symbol of
White Box continuing to fuel individual artists as well as Oregon’s
artistic, social and civic communities long after the lights are off.
Please join us in saying farewell.
Cris Moss
WHITE BOX  |  Director and Curator
Exhibiting Artists
Intisar Abioto
Holly Andres
Corey Arnold
Avantika Bawa
Carla Bengston
Pat Boas
John Brodie
Karl Burkheimer
Bruce Conkle
Peter Campus
Shelby Davis
Modou Dieng
David Eckard
Kristy Edmonds
Damien Gilly
MK Guth
Jesse Hayward
Sean Healy
Daniel Heffernan
Daniel Heyman
Craig Hickman
Laura Hughes
Malia Jensen
Todd Johnson
Kristin Kennedy
Elizabeth Malaska
Jenene Nagy
Liz Obert
Julia Oldham
Suzanne Opton
Melody Owens
Wendy Red Star
Patrick Rock
Crystal Schenk
Heidi Schwegler
Storm Tharp

Spring Professional Development Workshops

May 5 | Guerilla Promotion to Build Your Audience

1:00-3:00 PM | WOW Hall

Turn yourself into a promotional powerhouse to fuel your artistic practice. With overwhelming diversity of artists and platforms, it seems harder than ever to distinguish yourself and build an audience. Take a deep dive into everything you need to know to stand out in the crowded entertainment and media landscape. Presented by Rich Hobby, Marketing and Public Relations Manager, Hult Center for the Performing Arts. Register here

May 19 | Craft and Communicate Your Brand: Panel Discussion

1:00-3:00 PM | WOW Hall

Developing a strong brand is key to making your promotion efficient and effective. Learn from our panel of music professionals about how to build an authentic brand identity that tells your evolving story, defines your purpose, and propels you forward. This workshop features a panel of accomplished musicians, composers, sound engineers, and producers with varying informed perspectives: Halie Loren, Tim McLaughlin, Tony Glausi, and Thaddeus Moore of Sprout City Studios. Led by author/artist Vicki Amorose. Register here

June 2 | Venue Booking and Contracts: Panel Discussion

1:00-2:30 PM | Networking Reception at 2:30 PM | WOW Hall

This workshop will prepare you to think proactively about networking and visibility, negotiating contracts, and securing performances at venues of all sizes. It will guide you through best practices and the do’s and don’ts of the industry from the venue perspective. Hear directly from a panel of booking professionals from The Community Center for the Performing Arts/WOW Hall, HiFi, Hult Center, and The Shedd Institute. Join us for a reception immediately after the workshop. Register here

REGISTER TODAY:  http://lanearts.org/workshops/

All workshops are held at the Community Center for the Performing Arts/WOW Hall. Participants may sign up for an individual workshop for $20, or attend the full series for a discounted price of $50. 

Presented in partnership with the City of Eugene Cultural Services Division and the University of Oregon School of Music and Dance. A special thank you to title sponsor Pacific Continental Bank.

Laugh Your Panties Off! @ Killjoy Collective

Please join Killjoy Collective on Friday May 5 from 6:00 – 9:00 pm for Laugh Your Panties Off, a donation drive event benefitting the Salvation Army Female Emergency Shelter! We will be collecting donations of new underwear, bras, and feminine hygiene products. Panty drive!

Comic and artist Katie Piatt will be hosting the event with other special guests making us laugh all night with screenings of RuPaul’s Drag Race in between. Donate your new underpants!

Amanda Wojick at Elizabeth Leach Gallery

Amanda Wojick, Small Black Painting , 2017, acrylic and cotton on linen, 10 x 8.5″

Preview Reception:
May 3, 6 – 8 pm

First Thursday Reception:
May 4, 6 – 8 pm

May 4 – 27, 2017

Amanda Wojick
Cutouts and Collage

Paintings and Sculpture


Amanda Wojick is an artist based in Eugene, Oregon who creates inventive, brightly colored artworks that accentuate the handmade process. Cutouts and Collage features new sculptures and paintings that highlight Wojick’s idiosyncratic artmaking practice and dynamic visual vocabulary.

Wojick’s work merges highly personal and symbolic traces from the cultural space of the home, with imperfect geometry and wobbly patterns. Her latest creations are inspired by small freehand paper cutouts and other everyday materials found within the space that she lives. Using layers of unexpected texture, vibrant colors, and surprising arrangements, she creates unique hybrids that intermingle elements of painting, sculpture, and collage.

The exhibition features multicolored standing sculptures, stacked wooden wall pieces, and intimately-sized paintings flecked with gold, gingham fabric or painted polka dots. Every one of Wojick’s imaginative new artworks are enlivened by her inventive use of surface, scale and materiality.

Amanda Wojick received a MFA from Bard College and from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, and a BA from Colgate University. She has had recent exhibitions at Stene Projects (Stockholm, Sweden), Ucross Art Gallery (Sheridan, WY), Disjecta, (Portland, OR), and the The Art Gym, (Marylhurst, OR). Past exhibitions include Gridspace, (Brooklyn, NY), Buffalo Arts Studio (Buffalo, NY), Portland Art Museum (Portland, OR), Tacoma Art Museum (Tacoma, WA), Susan Hobbs Gallery, (Toronto, Canada), Whatcom Museum (Bellingham, WA), Jordan Schnitzer Museum at the University of Oregon (Eugene, OR), and Sun Valley Center for the Arts (Ketchum, ID) among others. Her work is included in the permanent collection of Portland Art Museum, Tacoma Art Museum and many private collections.

ELIZABETH LEACH GALLERY
417 NW 9th
Portland, Oregon 97209
503.224.0521
www.elizabethleach.com

FRIDAY: AHA Graduate Research Symposium, Art and Politics

Please join us TOMORROW for the 13th Annual Art History Association Graduate Research Symposium!

We are also pleased to announce an Undergraduate panel featuring papers by three of our art history students: Marianna Finke, Michelle Bynum, and Madeline Jenkins!

All presentations will be held in the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Papé Reception Hall and are open to the public. Coffee and tea will be served. A full list of all presenters and paper topics is attached.

10:00 Welcome

10:15-11:15 Undergraduate Panel: Art & Identity

11:15-12:30 Graduate Panel: Art & Activism

12:30-2:00 Lunch

2:00-3:30 Graduate Panel: Art & Propaganda

The event will conclude with a reception at 4:30pm and keynote lecture delivered by Dr. Nizan Shaked on “Conceptualism and the Political Referent,” at 5:30pm in LA115. We invite all students, faculty, and staff to attend this exciting lecture.

Arts & Cultural Equity

Arts & Cultural Equity: Current Examples and Relevant Strategies brings together arts and cultural workers, managers, educators, and students to share current insights, experiences, and practices around equity and leadership within arts and culture organizations. Presenters will represent the range of equity work within Oregon-based arts and cultural organizations and groups. Our goal is for everyone to walk away with approaches to sharpen our collective work around these practices. Presenters include:
  • Eloise Damrosch // Executive Director, Regional Arts & Culture Council
  • Phillip Hillaire //  Board Member, Regional Arts & Culture Council
  • Andre Middleton // Director of Equity & Digital Inclusion, Open Signal
  • Roya Amirsoleymani // Director of Community Engagement, Portland Institute for Contemporary Art; Arts Workers for Equity
  • Kathleen Holt // Associate Director/Editor, Oregon Humanities Magazine
  • Toni Tabora-Roberts // Founder and Chief Esper, Esper House; Arts Workers for Equity
This event additionally celebrates the 20th anniversary of  CultureWork: A Periodic Broadside for Arts & Culture Workers. CultureWork is a timely work-place oriented publication of the UO’s Center for Community Arts & Cultural Policy, serving arts and cultural management practitioners by publishing commentaries, advisories, and case studies about trends and practices in community arts, cultural policy, arts and education, and arts management.
This forum is free and includes lunch. Coffee and registration will begin at 9:00a. Please RSVP here by Friday, May 5 at 5:00p PST. Please contact ccacp@uoregon.edu with any questions.
Presented by the UO’s Center for Community Arts & Cultural Policy (CCACP) in collaboration with the University of Oregon Arts and Administration Program (AAD) and with special support from the Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) and Oregon Humanities.

Save the date! 2017 Pierson Lecture: Thursday, May 18, 3:30-5:00 in Gerlinger Lounge

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You are invited to attend the 2017 Stan and Joan Pierson Lecture, an annual event hosted by Department of History at the University of Oregon. This year, we’re honored and delighted to welcome Dyan Elliott, the Peter B. Ritzma Professor of the Humanities and Professor of History at Northwestern University. Elliott is the author of many books and articles on women, sexuality, and mysticism in medieval Europe, most recently The Bride of Christ Goes to Hell: Metaphor and Embodiment in the Lives of Pious Women, 200-1500 (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012). 
 
Elliott will give a presentation titled “Back to the Future: Scandal, Pederasty, and the Medieval Church.” This year’s Pierson Lecture will take place on Thursday, May 18, in the Gerlinger Lounge at 3:30-5:00 pm. The lecture is free and open to the public. There will be a reception in Gerlinger Lounge immediately following the lecture.

FRIDAY: AHA Symposium Keynote Lecture “Conceptualism and the Political Referent”

Nizan Shaked, PhD, will deliver the keynote address for the 13th Annual Art History Association Graduate Research Symposium on Friday, April 28, 2017.

Shaked’s lecture will present key ideas from her forthcoming book The Synthetic Proposition: Conceptualism and the Political Referent in Contemporary Art. She’ll examine the impact of social movements—including civil rights, Black power, student, feminist, and sexual liberation—on conceptualism and its legacies in the United States between the late 1960s and the 1990s. Shaked will discuss the turn to political reference in practices originally concerned with philosophically abstract ideas and trace key strategies in contemporary art today to the reciprocal influences of conceptualism and identity politics.

RECEPTION • 4:30-5:30pm • Lawrence Hall

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Conceptualism and the Political Referent • 5:30-6:30pm • 115 Lawrence Hall

This event is free and open to all students, faculty, and staff.

Hamstock Event and Art Walk

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Please see attachment linked above.

My name is Victoria Delon and I am the Financial Representative of Hamilton West Residence Hall part of the University of Oregon Housing Department. I am part of a Hall Government Association for Hamilton West and as a Hall we are organizing a music festival event at the end of this Spring term, June 3rd precisely.

As part of this annual event, we have decided on a new addition to the festival, an ‘Art Walk’. This Art walk would be an occasion for students to expose their art, whether it be photography, design, or painting, on grids that would be posted on the lawn, where the festival would take place (which is situated in front of Hamilton Residence Halls).

Hamstock will take place June 3rd from 4 – 8 PM. It is a free access event for all students

I am the contact for submissions and my email address is on the poster: vdelon@uoregon.edu.

Picture This! 🎨🃏 Live Animated Comedy at the Bridgetow

Picture This! at the 10th annualBRIDGETOWN COMEDY FESTIVAL

PORTLAND: After a 2 year hiatus, Picture This! is finally returning to #PDX for the 10th annual Bridgetown Comedy Festival!!

COMEDY BY:
Guy Branum (Talk Show the Game Show, The Mindy Project)
Nico Santos (Superstore, Chelsea Lately)
Chris Fairbanks (Conan, Punching Henry)
Sonia Denis (Comedy Central Comics to Watch)
Mike Lebovitz (Last Comic Standing)
Andie Main (SF Sketchfest)

ANIMATION BY:
Mike Hollingsworth (Bojack Horseman)
Shane Hosea
Carolyn Main 
& more!

HOSTED BY: Brandie Posey (Lady to Lady)

FRIDAY 5/5
Doors 8:30pm, Show 9pm
$15 at the door or get your festival pass HERE
at the Paris Theatre
6 SW 3rd Ave
Portland, OR 97204

RSVP for PRESS COMPSwith sammvarela@gmail.com

Pacific Northwest Preservation Field School

The Pacific Northwest Preservation Field School is hosting an info session on Wednesday April 26 at 12:15 p.m. in Lawrence Hall Rm 206.

The field school is an unforgettable preservation adventure– a great collaborative experience that brings together practitioners, students, craftspersons, and academics to engage in hands-on work. Come learn about our upcoming summer project at the Fenn Ranger Station in the Nez Perce National Forest, Idaho. We will be documenting a culutral landscape, restoring CCC-era masonry, and peeling back layers of siding to reveal historic material hidden underneath. More information can be found at hp.uoregon.edu/pnwfs.

All are welcome to join in for a  brief presentation followed by Q&A. We’ll talk scholarships, job opportunites, camp sites, power tools, hot springs, and more! Lunch is provided.

Support Local Arts this Earth Day!

Get ready for the best art party in Eugene! The Emerging Leaders in the Arts Network (ELAN) invites you to join us for our 8th Annual Beats & Brushstrokes fundraiser on Saturday, April 22 from 7:00p-11:00p at Sam Bonds Brewing Co. + Barn Light East on 8th Avenue. There will be free food, participatory art projects with Eugene Printmakers and OSLP Arts & Culture, local visual and performing artists, a silent auction and more!
Performances include:

LloronaMC PlaedoPat Waters, Reggae Rob,Jonathan Corona Duo,Integrated Arts Platform,West African Cultural Arts Institute
All proceeds support the Emerging Leaders in the Arts Network, including $1 of every beer sold. I truly hope you can attend our event, we would love your support.

Please contact me with any questions and I look forward to seeing you on Saturday!

Best,

Lauren Nichols
Public Relations Chair
Emerging Leaders in the Arts Network
Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Blog
lnichols@uoregon.edu

 

FREE Photography Critique Forum at Maude Kerns Art Center

Maude Kerns Art Center Presents

Free Photography Critique Forum

With Members of the Carrefour Photography Collective

Saturday, April 22, 1:00 – 4:00 pm

This is an opportunity to have your photographic efforts reviewed by the current exhibitors in “On the Road”: Edward Beier, Michael Eichwald, Stephanie Luke, and Harvey Spector. These four photographers make up the Carrefour Photography Collective. Each artist has practiced photography for forty years or more. They will participate in a panel discussion about their individual experiences and will engage in a critique of images. Audience participation and feedback is encouraged.

This is a free workshop. You are invited to bring one or two of your digital images on a thumb drive (or similar device). The images will be enlarged and projected for easy viewing. This is a way to gain insight into your photographic process and a chance to learn how to improve your skills within an encouraging environment.

Please contact the Art Center to sign up: 541-345-1571 or email exhibits@mkartcenter.org.

This message is being posted because it may be of interest to University of Oregon art students.  Neither the UO nor the Department of Art make any representations or endorsements regarding the content of the message or its originator.  Any questions or comments about the message should be directed to the originator of the message and not to the Department of Art.

Special Arts After Hours 2017

Please join us for a SPECIAL Arts After Hours 2017.

 

THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 2017

5 to 7pm  •  Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

 

This promises to be an amazing opportunity to learn about the arts and cultural activities happening in our community and view the Museum’s permanent and special exhibitions, including “Pour it On! Watercolors from the West.” Museum curators will be on hand to provide guided tours.

 

Participating Arts Organizations include:

 

  • Ballet Fantastique
  • Delgani String Quartet
  • Emerald Art Center
  • Eugene Ballet Company
  • Eugene Symphony Association
  • Eugene-Springfield Youth Orchestras
  • Hult Center for the Performing Arts
  • Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
  • Lane Arts Council
  • Oregon Bach Festival
  • Oregon Supported Living Program
  • Radio Redux
  • Refuge Music Therapy
  • Shelton McMurphey Johnson House
  • Vino and Vango
  • WordCrafters of Eugene

 

Iris wines, Ninkasi beer, hors d’oeuvres, door prizes, and more!

CLICK HERE to register.


This message is being posted because it may be of interest to University of Oregon art students.  Neither the UO nor the Department of Art make any representations or endorsements regarding the content of the message or its originator.  Any questions or comments about the message should be directed to the originator of the message and not to the Department of Art.

HOPES[23] Conference

Wow what an exciting first day of HOPES yesterday! We have another great line up for you today of speakers, panels, and workshops to kick off the second day of the 23rd annual HOPES Conference. The schedule is as follows:
Tea in Native American Urbanism a workshop by Alan Waxman (registration is open on our website) from 10:00-12:00 in LA 286
Roundtable Discussion and Lunch with Alex Miller sponsored by PODS from 11:00 AM to 12:30 in LA 277
“Toward an Urban Ecology” a lecture by Gena Wirth from 12:00 to 1:00 in LA 115
“Soil! What it is and How it Works” a lecture by James Cassidy from 6:00 to 7:00 in LA 278
Thirsty? The Politics of Water a HOPES moderated panel discussion from 7:00-8:00 PM in LA 206
Dinner Gathering catered by Falling Sky in the Wilcox Hearth from 8:00 – 9:00 PM
*additional scheduling information can be found on our website  https://hopes.uoregon.edu/
Registration is still open for one of our Saturday Workshops, SHAPE DIS-PLACE. Led by Nancy Cheng, Mariah Rajabzadeh, and Mohsin Marizad, students will create tent and wall configurations using as little material as possible. All materials are supplied for you, all you need to bring is your imagination and willingness to try something new! More information on SHAPE DIS-PLACE can be found on our website or in one of the HOPES[23] passports.
Don’t forget, for each event you attend you receive a stamp and four stamps gets you a HOPES[23] t-shirts! T-shirts will be given out every night at our Dinner Gatherings.

Free lecture: Pythons of the Sea: Natural History of the Nemertean Worm

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The Eugene Natural History Society

Presents a Free Lecture:

Pythons of the Sea:

Natural History of the Nemertean Worm

 Svetlana Maslakova

Associate Professor of Biology

Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, University of Oregon

Nemertean worms are some of the ocean’s strangest carnivores, both in colorful body designs and prey capture techniques. Known as ribbon worms or proboscis worms, many are aggressive hunters that spear their prey. Dr. Maslakova is one of the few experts on nemerteans in the world. She will talk about the biology of this fascinating but understudied phylum of marine invertebrates, including their predatory habits, larval development, and diversity.

Friday, 21 April 2017

7:30pm, Room 100 Willamette Hall,

UO Campus

Co-sponsored by the UO Science Library

Contact: Tom Titus (541) 484-4477

Website: http://pages.uoregon.edu/enhs/

 

The 23rd annual HOPES Conference

The 23rd annual HOPES Conference is finally here! We have an exciting
line up of lectures, panels and workshops to announce. Today’s schedule
includes:
“Fabricating Landscapes” a lecture by Karen M’Closkey at 12:00 PM in LA
279
“Decolonial Landscape Architecture” a lecture by Alan Waxman at 1:00 PM
in LA 286
“Displacement: Case Studies from the Field” where Alex Miller, James
Miller, and Alan Waxman will be presenting their work followed by a
short discussion at 4:00 PM in LA 206
“Design Thinking in Displacement” a lecture by Andrew Cusack at 6:00 PM
in LA 206
“Divided Cities: Modern Gentrification” a panel led by STAnDD at 7:00 PM
in LA 206
  Dinner Gathering catered by Falling Sky tonight in the Hearth at 8:30
PM.
*additional scheduling information can be found on our website
Don’t forget to grab one of our passports and get your stamps at any
event you attend, four stamps gets you a HOPES t-shirt.

Commodities, Traders: Ron Jude and Milton Rogovin April 8 – May 26, 2017 Gallery Luisotti, Santa Monica, CA

Gallery Luisotti is pleased to announce Commodities, Traders, a two-person
exhibition of photographs by Ron Jude and Milton Rogovin. Jude’s series of
color photographs Executive Model, which depicts closely cropped views of
men’s backs in formal business attire in several financial districts, is
paired with Rogovin’s highly specific black and white photographs of coal
miners and their families from around the world. For this unlikely
presentation of artists from different generations, Rogovin’s photographs
will be arranged around the main part of the gallery primarily by region and
Jude’s photographs will be placed in a borderline claustrophobic line along
the back wall of the gallery behind the front desk. This spatial arrangement
heightens the readings of the individuals on view—visible and engaged as
opposed to turned away and mysterious. The exhibition comes at a turbulent
and unpredictable time in American life when the workers of shrinking
industries are being made questionable promises by the president while
financial markets are performing at record highs.
Jude’s Executive Model portrays its subjects in an opaque manner. This
opacity corresponds to the vagaries of high level financial trading to those
outside the world of finance. Jude made the work by following businessmen,
usually unnoticed, around Wall Street and its correlates around the country.
The men loom large in the frame, matching the partial views of skyscrapers
around them. Jude’s project echoes Vito Acconci’s Following Piece (1969),
and in the repetition of the business suit, typologies by the Bechers. There
is a narrow range of individuality that these men express, usually marked by
the presence or absence of pinstripes, slightly different haircuts, and
shades of fabric between dark navy and black. As unidentifiable as these men
are, the viewer has little idea as to what they actually do. The
unaccountability takes on an eerie dimension.
The differences between the two projects are numerous, in form and content,
but those differences belie the deep connections between the lives of coal
miners and those who work in the financial sector. Curiously, despite the
contemporary feel of Jude’s work, it was made in the early 1990s, shortly
after Rogovin had concluded photographing miners and other workers in the
late 1980s. This contiguity of timing speaks to a kind of break or passing
between types of economies, from a market of industrial products to a market
of information or even financial products themselves. 1980 marked the year of
peak coal industry employment in the United States and the beginning of
accelerated neo-liberalization under President Ronald Reagan. While the
government is often seen as antagonizing the coal industry, any examination
of the matter makes it clear that coal is simply being outperformed and
undercut by natural gas on the commodities market. Despite all appearances
and the changes in the industries shown, Rogovin’s miners are linked by the
market to Jude’s anonymous moneymen.
The exhibition will open on April 8 and will run through May 26, 2017. For more information about the exhibition or artists, please call (310) 453-0043.
http://galleryluisotti.com/exhibitions-current/

OPEN SHELF LIBRARY: THE STACKS

The Museum of Contemporary Art Denver is pleased to present an exhibition
curated by Derrick Valezquez, on view now through September 2017.
“We accumulate knowledge in stacks. Libraries store books in dense networks
of shelves called “stacks,” where each shelf holds information, research,
and stories. Museums and galleries keep their art in “stacks”—racks,
cubbies, and drawers. Artists often make piles of their work and materials.
The Stacks is an archive of art objects ranging from salvaged painted walls
from a recently closed DIY art space in Denver to new artworks made to be
shown on shelves and in drawers that resemble card catalogues. This
accumulation of material is the product of ongoing research into the
intersecting facets of creative communities in Denver and studio practices
across the country. The works engage with the idea of the archive and the
aesthetic of the library.”
Works by:
Amna Asghar
Sierra Montoya Barela
Marco Cousins
Cory Feder
Adam Gildar
Stephan Herrera
Jovencio de la Paz
Raúl Romero
Thomas Scharfenberg
Colin Ward
Patrice Renee Washington

World Music Series: De Cajón Project

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World Music Series: De Cajón Project

Saturday, April 15 at 7:30pm 
7:30 p.m., Beall Concert Hall, Frohnmayer Music Building

DE CAJóN Project is a community arts organization based in Seattle, WA dedicated to educating populations about the cultural contributions of Peruvians of African descent. As a movement we facilitate music and dance workshops; offer lectures and residencies; perform widely throughout the Pacific Northwest with our company; and build inter-cultural and inter-generational communities through art. We actively support similar efforts in Peru and collaborate with other individuals and groups that use art as an empowering tool for change.

$12 general admission, $8 students and seniors
Tickets are available at the door or in advance from the UO Ticket Office, 541-346-4363.

Art and Politics: 13th Annual Art History Association Student Research Symposium

The University of Oregon’s Department of the History of Art and Architecture announces its 13th Annual Graduate Student Research Symposium: Art and Politics on Friday, April 28, 2017.

Student Presentations, JSMA Papé Reception Hall

10:00-11:15am Welcome and Undergraduate Session: Art and Identity

11:15am-12:45pm Graduate Morning Session: Art and Activism

12:45-2:00pm Lunch Break

2:00-3:30pm Graduate Afternoon session: Art and Propaganda

3:30pm Closing Remarks

Keynote Address, Lawrence Hall 115

4:30-5:30pm Reception (outside of LA177)

5:30-6:30pm Keynote Address by Nizan Shaked (California State University, Long Beach): Conceptualism and the Political Referent

 

All events are free and open to the public.

UO Music in Poetry Symposium: April 7th & 8th

Symposium poster PDF_for public-12t24ddMusic in Poetry Poetry in Music (symposium program) (002)-1osg2va

Please see links above for more information.

Tomorrow and Saturday: April 7th & 8th at the Collier House across from Friendly Hall and the EMU, starting at 9am both days:

On April 7th and 8th we will be holding an extraordinary event on the UO campus: “Music in Poetry, Poetry in Music: an Interdisciplinary Symposium on German Art Song”—a two-day conference, followed by an evening of song performances and readings (Liederabend).   The symposium comprises interpretive analyses of poetic texts in musical settings from the romantic period through the modernism of the Second Vienna School, presented by invited outside speakers as well as faculty and graduate students of the UO School of Music and Dance and Department of German and Scandinavian.  Please join us for this rare opportunity to explore the complex works of this very rich tradition.

Cosponsored by the European Studies Department, the German Studies Committee, The School of Music and Dance, the Department of German and Scandinavian, CAS, OHC, and DAAD.

The Art Gym presents The Lost Chord, a solo exhibition by Jack Ryan

 
Ryan is an interdisciplinary artist living in the Pacific Northwest. His practice
uses sculpture and sound as a conduit to explore culture. Ryan’s history of
working with collaborative groups is longstanding and influences the way he
thinks about authorship. He credits the artists, curators, musicians, and
writers involved with helping shape the work in the exhibition.
Jack Ryan is the co-director of Ditch Projects in Springfield, OR, the
director of Pacific Sky Exhibitions in Eugene, OR, and is a co-founder of
Fugitive Projects based out of Nashville, TN. He has exhibited in venues such
as The IMAFY (Cairo Egypt); Dublin Electronics Arts Festival (Ireland);
Maison Laurentine (Paris); Ausstellungsraum Klingental (Basel, Switzerland);
American University Museum (Washington DC); The Hirshhorn Museum and
Sculpture Garden (Washington D.C); MICA (Baltimore); and Syracuse University.
Ryan twice attended the Banff Centre as a fellow and last summer attended a
residency at Djerassi funded by The Ford Family Foundation. This last year he
has presented projects at the University of California as well as venues in
Nashville, Indianapolis, Connecticut, New Jersey, and Chicago. In 2015 he was
awarded The Hallie Ford Fellowship and jointly received the Precipice Fund
administered by Portland Institute for Contemporary Art (PICA) as part of the
Regional Regranting Program of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts
with lead support from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the
Calligram Foundation/Allie Furlotti. Last summer he was included in the 2016
Portland Biennial curated by Michelle Grabner.
The Art Gym is supported by the Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation, the
Collins Foundation, the Oregon Arts Commission, and the National Endowment
for the Arts. The Art Gym’s publication fund is supported by the Harold &
Arlene Schnitzer CARE Foundation and Linda Hutchins and John Montague. Other
individuals and businesses provided additional support. Jack Ryan also
received support from the Oregon Arts Commission and The Ford Family
Foundation for work in this exhibition and publication.

Redefining Women in Tech

Today technology is much more than just computer science and engineering; it
is embedded in our everyday lives and careers. We want to make the
conversation more inclusive. Join us.
The topic for this event:
STEM to STEAM: Exploring the intersection of Arts + Tech
Panel discussion featuring amazing local women from the arts/tech scene.
Get connected to local Arts and Tech resources.
Meet others and share ideas.
Connect with local professionals.
RSVP and follow event for details!
Event details also available on
This event is open all people interested in our topic and discussion.
Redefining Women in Tech are professionals and students emphasizing openness
and creativity with technology

The Points of Departure A solo exhibition of new work by Tannaz Farsi

Dates:  March 22-April 29
Artist Talk: March 22 at 5PM in Delkin Hall
Opening Reception: March 22, 6-7PM

Next week is Lindfield’s spring break. The gallery will be open Monday March 27-Friday March 31 by appointment (please email jzarkovi@linfield.edu). We will have regular Saturday hours April 1, 12-5PM

Linfield Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of newly created work by Eugene-based artist Tannaz Farsi. The exhibition is on view from March 22 to April 29.  An artist talk will be held at Delkin Hall in the Vivian Bull Music Center on March 22 at 5PM followed directly by a reception. Drinks and light refreshments will be served.

ABOUT THE EXHBITION

In an ambitious new solo exhibition, Tannaz Farsi weaves together three works that articulate different moments within the history of Iranian visual culture. Exploring the semiotic richness of specific traditional iconographies, the artist sets their interpretation as a reflection upon the present.

The Points of Departure features a series of large scale works, including an expansive linear structure drafted from a 15thcentury drawing of a polygonal and star pattern found in The Topkapi Scroll, an architectural booklet attributed to the central or western region of Iran. While some examples of the scroll patterns can be found in existing buildings, the scroll was most likely a booklet of potential forms due to a lack of direct examples found in remaining architecture of the time. The artist became interested in the specific lineage of these patterns as a historical code and as a means of entering a speculative relationship around scientific, political and aesthetic means of power specific to time and place within the region.

In the second work, the artist has collected the names of Iranian women, historical and contemporary, to create a visible and accountable document of women’s public intellectual labor in Iran and abroad. The font that she created for the alphabet is influenced by a stacking square form that was introduced in the 10th century as a system of measurement in Arabic calligraphy. This means of creating a “proportioned script” was used to create consistency and repeatability of text. This work is counterposed with the image of the artist’s hand with a remnant of a column collected at Persepolis, the dynastic center of the Achaemenid kings and a site that lacks physical representation of women within its monuments and relief sculptures.

Finally, the exhibition includes an arrangement of 1,000 live tulips. The tulip is a potent and complex symbol in Iranian culture, having been used to represent martyrdom, renewal and opposition. Planted specifically for The Points of Departure at the turn of spring equinox, the tulips move through their cycle of regeneration, to grow, bloom and change throughout the exhibition.

For over a decade, the artist has been working in a variety of media to create powerful installations and projects that address the politics of nationhood and diasporic identity. Linfield Gallery is commemorating Farsi’s work by publishing a significant catalog that brings together documentation of her previous work alongside images from The Points of Departure and includes two newly-commissioned essays.

This exhibition is sponsored by the Lacroute Art Series and the Department of Art and Visual Culture. The Lacroute Arts Series at Linfield College is made possible by the generosity of Ronni Lacroute, Linfield College trustee and arts benefactor. The series, sponsored by the Lacroute Arts Fund at Linfield College, is dedicated to helping the college present art events and activities for the campus and community. It provides programs featuring artists in the areas of music, art and visual culture, and theatre and communication arts.

Additional support comes from the Ford Family Foundation as well as the Yamhill County Cultural Coalition, which includes funding from the Oregon Cultural Trust and the Oregon Community Foundation.

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Using the language and history of sculpture, installation, and conceptual art practices, Tannaz Farsi’s work highlights and re-presents objects and images that contextually start from a collective experience found in the current news or within the milieu of our cultural archive. Central to the work is the notion of fragmentation, structural blindness and individual agency. She works with materials and forms that are easily recognizable, using our familiarity to tease out a common language that is at once analytical and physical and allows for a complexity of meaning to develop through arrangement, organization and form. The work is project based and her studio practice crosses a range of mediums such as sculpture, photography, printmaking, and digital media. As an artist, she is interested in the friction that is instigated within the mixing of these conventions – whether it is an aesthetic structure that informs a political commentary or an attempt to bring an irrational idea or an idea that does not have definitive form into a physical structure.

Her work has been exhibited at venues including Portland Institute of Contemporary Art, Portland; Disjecta Contemporary Art Center, Portland; Pitzer College Art Galleries, Claremont, CA; Tacoma Art Museum, Tacoma, WA; the Urban Institute of Contemporary Art, Grand Rapids, MI; Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts, Wilmington; and The Sculpture Center, Cleveland, OH. She has been granted residencies at Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, Ucross Foundation, the McDowell Colony and the Santa Fe Art Institute. Her work has been supported through grants and awards from the Oregon Arts Commission, National Endowment for the Arts, University of Oregon and the Ford Family Foundation where she was named a Hallie Ford Fellow in 2014. Born in Iran, Farsi lives and works in Eugene, where she is on the faculty at the University of Oregon.

ABOUT LINFIELD GALLERY 

Exhibitions of regional, national and international stature are on view throughout the academic year in the 1,500 square foot space at Linfield College. Patrons can expect challenging shows that exemplify diverse approaches to the practice of contemporary visual art. All exhibits are free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday from noon to 5 p.m. The gallery is located in the James F. Miller Fine Arts Center on the Linfield College campus. To reach the gallery from 99W, turn east on Keck Drive at the McMinnville Market Center in south McMinnville. Turn right at the first street onto Library Court. The art gallery is located in the second building on the left, Building B. Parking is available on the street and in the lot west of Nicholson Library. For more information, call 503.883.2804

Music in Poetry, Poetry in Music: an Interdisciplinary Symposium on German Art Song

Please save the dates of April 7th and 8th for this extraordinary upcoming event on the UO campus: “Music in Poetry, Poetry in Music: an Interdisciplinary Symposium on German Art Song”—a two-day conference, followed by an evening of song performances and readings (Liederabend).   The symposium comprises interpretive analyses of poetic texts in musical settings from the romantic period through the modernism of the Second Vienna School, presented by invited outside speakers as well as faculty and graduate students of the UO School of Music and Dance and Department of German and Scandinavian.  Please join us for this rare opportunity to explore the complex works of this very rich tradition.

More information/publicity to be distributed soon.

Cosponsored by the German Studies Committee, The School of Music and Dance, the Department of German and Scandinavian, CAS, OHC, and DAAD.

Music in Poetry, Poetry in Music: An Interdisciplinary Symposium on German Art Song

Friday and Saturday, April 7 and 8

Collier House

Free and open to the public

Friday, April 7, 9:15am-12pm

Revising and Musicalizing Goethe’s “Ein Gleiches”

Dorothee Ostmeier, University of Oregon Goethe’s “Ein Gleiches” in Concrete Poetry

Stephen Rodgers, University of Oregon Recomposing Two Musical Settings of Goethe’s “Ein Gleiches” in Romantic Style

Chi (Iris) Wang, University of Oregon Remixing Two Musical Settings of Goethe’s “Ein Gleiches” with Electronic Media

Friday, April 7, 2-4:45pm

Schubert: Motion, Ending, End

Chelsea Wright, University of Oregon Motion in Music, Music in Motion: Musical Forces in Die schöne Müllerin

Yonatan Malin, University of Colorado Boulder Poetic Endings and Song Endings in Müller and Schubert’s Winterreise

Susan Youens, University of Notre Dame Reentering Mozart’s Hell: Schubert’s “Gruppe aus dem Tartarus”

Saturday, April 8, 9-10:45am

The Mendelssohns: Nature and Rhythm in Art Song

Amanda Lalonde, Mount Allison University Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel and the Wilderness at Home

Harald Krebs, University of Victoria Flawed or Felicitous? An Investigation of Declamation in Mendelssohn’s Lieder

Saturday, April 8, 11am-12:45pm

The Schumanns: Translating Between Literature and Music

Alexis Smith, University of Oregon Schumann “Sounds Like” Hoffmann: Kreisleriana Op. 16 and the Possibility of Intersemiotic Translation

Beverly Taflinger, University of Oregon  “Sie wie als Mädchen noch schwärmt”: Music and Text in Clara Schumann’s Heine Songs

Saturday, April 8, 3-4:45pm

Brahms and Schoenberg: Structures of Eros and Anxiety

Virginia Hancock, Reed College Brahms’s Bard

Jack Boss, University of Oregon Schoenberg’s Erwartung as Leitmotivic Opera

 

 

Aphotic Sums by artist Jovencio de la Paz

The Alice would like to welcome you to the opening of the exhibition Aphotic
Sums by artist Jovencio de la Paz, Saturday the 18th of March, 5-7pm.
“Using traditional colonial American textile processes including overshot
weaving and hand rug-punching, the soft works in this exhibition exist
between a variety of external pressures. As commodity, as Americana, as
witness to a dark, Colonial past embedded and encoded in fabric both physical
and social, these lengths of cloth are formal explorations and reverse
stratigraphy, patterns and processes displaced in time and history. The
structures at the core of these textiles, the binary “over and under” of
woven fabric, evoke other assumed binaries: blackness and whiteness, high and
low culture, the public and the domestic, the political and the poetic. In
the absence of chroma, these works deal in stark contrasts, and situate
themselves in the turbulent place where the soft world of cloth confronts the
hard edge of the political.”
Jovencio de la Paz is an artist, writer, and educator. His work explores the
intersection of textile processes such as weaving, dye, and surface design as
they relate to broader concerns of ancient technology, language,
codification, community, and identity. Interested in the ways transient or
ephemeral experiences are embodied in material, de la Paz looks to how
knowledge, stories, and memories are transmitted through society in space and
time, whether semiotically by language or haptically by made things. He is
currently Assistant Professor and Curricular Head of Fibers at the University
of Oregon.
Jovencio de la Paz received a Masters of Fine Art from the Cranbrook Academy
of Art (2012) and a Bachelors of Fine Art in Fiber and Material Studies from
the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2008). He has exhibited his work
both nationally and internationally, most recently at ThreeWalls, Chicago,
IL; The Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland, OR; Carl & Sloan Contemporary
Art, Portland, OR; 4th Ward Projects, Chicago, IL; SPACE Gallery, Portland,
ME; The Sculpture Center, Cleveland, OH; SPACE Gallery, Portland, ME; SOIL
Gallery, Seattle, WA; Roots & Culture Contemporary Art Center, Chicago; The
Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago; MessHall, Chicago; Uri Gallery, Seoul, South
Korea. among others. He regularly teaches at schools of art, craft, and
design throughout the country, including the Ox Bow School of Art in
Saugatuck, Michigan, the Haystack Mountain School of Craft in Deer Isle,
Maine, and the Arrowmont School of Craft in Tennessee. He is also a
co-founder of the collaborative group Craft Mystery Cult, established in
2010.

The Amazing Evolutionary Innovations of Pipefish, Seahorses and Seadragons

Flier March 2017-waeg7i

The Eugene Natural History Society

presents a free program: 

The Amazing Evolutionary Innovations

of Pipefish, Seahorses and Seadragons

Bill Cresko, Professor of Biology and

Associate Vice-President for Research, University of Oregon

Dr. Cresko will talk about pipefish, seahorses, and seadragons, a subfamily of closely related small fish with unusual and dramatically different body forms. His photographs are fabulous. First he will focus on the reproductive biology of these fishes. It’s the males that get pregnant! The males of some species have brood pouches where the embryos are stored as they develop. In other species the embryos adhere to the surface of the male’s body. In the last part of his talk Cresko will get at how gene activity during early development leads to radically different shapes later on.

Friday,  March 17,  2017

7:30 p.m., Room 100 Willamette Hall, UO Campus 

Co-sponsored by  the UO Science Library

Contact: Tom Titus  541-510-2500

http://pages.uoregon.edu/enhs

Call for Submissions – Men’s Story Project

The Men’s Story Project is part of a national network with the focus of male-identified individuals “sharing stories in public that challenge notions of masculinity for everyone’s benefit.”

This year’s event will be held on May 26th and 27th in the Global Scholars Hall. We are currently reaching out to male-identified individuals in the Eugene area and asking they consider submitting a 5-7 minute story (monologue, poem, dance, song, etc.) that relates to the theme of the project. A submission does not guarantee the story being chosen. Stories should focus on the masculinity and how it affects or has affected you or those around you. The deadline for submissions is March 20, 2017.

For inspiration or examples of projects, please check out clips from our 2015 event here:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzFOnAKa5wj6TJftvGgRn5A

Please email uomcmsp@gmail.com to ask questions or submit your entry. We hope you consider and submit a story for the event!

Sonic Spectres & the Object Hereafter

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Campus Lecture:  March 7, 6:30-8:00 pm, Lawrence 166

Kristen Gallerneaux, PhD Candidate, Art Practice, University of California San Diego / Curator of Communications & Information Technology, The Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation

Sonic Spectres & the Object Hereafter

In this multimedia lecture, Kristen Gallerneaux will share selections from her forthcoming publication High Static, Dead Lines: The Sonic Spectre and the Object Hereafter. Gallerneaux describes the hypothetical “sonic spectre” as being hitched at the hip with the history of objects: trees rigged up to the wireless heavens, a fax machine used to decode the language of hurricanes, an edible “radio pill,” voices on MASER beams, a failed computer factory/echo-chamber in the desert—a broadcast ghost that hijacked a television station to terrorize a city.

Utilizing her background as a writer, artist, and museum curator, Gallerneaux reactivates the emotional and physical histories of communication technologies and charged landscapes. In a series of “object lesson” vignettes, she will explore various boundary objects that benefit from a multidisciplinary approach—blending folklore and material culture studies with media archeology and experiments in sonic exploration.

Bio: 

Kristen Gallerneaux is a media historian, folklorist, and artist. She is also the Curator of Communication and Information Technology at The Henry Ford Museum, where she continues to build upon one of the largest historic technology collections in North America. In 2011, she graduated with a masters in Folklore from University of Oregon, and is PhD ABD in the Art Practice: Art History, Media Theory, and Criticism program at University of California, San Diego.

In 2016, she was invited to be a Future Thought speaker at MoogfestThe Synthesis of Art, Technology & Music, and also spoke at Unsound Krakow. She has written for the Barbican Center, ARTnews, and the Quietus. Her forthcoming book, High Static, Dead Lines: Sonic Spectres & the Object Hereafter will be released in October 2017 via Strange Attractor Press and distributed by MIT Press in the US. She has published on wide-ranging topics like mathematics in midcentury design, the visual history of telepathy research, the world’s first mousepad, and car audio bass battles in Miami.

ELAN presents “Creative Conversations”

Emerging Leaders in the Arts Network (ELAN) is inviting students &
faculty to participate in our upcoming event – Creative Conversations.
This interactive and engaging event will bring together individuals and
groups who are working to cultivate arts and culture programs, events,
and collaborations in Eugene.
Facilitated by Colette Ramirez, Community Events Manager for City of
Eugene Cultural Services Division, Creative Conversations will engage
participants in a series of rotating, roundtable discussions about
challenges and opportunities that individuals and organizations are
facing to cultivate arts and creative projects at the UO, Eugene and
beyond.
WHAT | Creative Conversations
WHEN | Wednesday, March 8th @ 5:30 PM
WHERE | Hop Valley Brewing Barrel Room, 990 W 1st Ave, Eugene, OR 97401
COST | FREE! Food is provided / Cash bar available
This is a unique opportunity for students, faculty, community leaders,
campus organizations, community organizations, and student groups to
network and come together for a collaborative discussion around arts and
culture programming and leadership in Eugene. We encourage participants
to share programming ideas, challenges you might be facing, and what
you’re all about!
Your presence is highly valued and integral to the success of this
collaborative event. We would love to have you and your team join us! We
have reserved a private space at Hop Valley Brewing and will be
providing food for all attendees + a cash bar is available. An RSVP is
appreciated but not required.
For more information please see our Facebook Event Page:
If you have any questions, please contact us at elan@uoregon.edu. We
hope to see you soon!

2017 CSWS Northwest Women Writers Symposium: featuring Ayana Mathis

2017 CSWS Northwest Women Writers Symposium: featuring Ayana Mathis

  • March 3 Light reception 2:30 – 3 p.m. JSMA Ford Lecture Hall
  • March Panel with Ayana Mathis: 3:00 – 4:30 p.m. JSMA Ford Lecture Hall
  • March 3 Keynote talk with Ayana Mathis: 6 – 8 p.m. Downtown Eugene Public Library

Free & open to the public

6th annual CSWS Northwest Women Writers Symposium

“Women and Work: Stories of the Great Migration”

printable flyer PDF

Oprah’s interview with Ayana Mathis

The acclaimed, bestselling author Ayana Mathis will deliver a keynote lecture and participate in a panel discussion focused on her celebrated novel The Twelve Tribes of Hattie, at the 6th annual CSWS Northwest Women Writers Symposium, “Women and Work: Women’s Stories of Work and the Great Migration.”

Ayana Mathis

Ayana Mathis

Mathis’s debut novel, The Twelve Tribes of Hattie, was a New York Times Bestseller, a 2013 New York Times Notable Book of the Year, a Boston Globe Best Book of the Year, and an NPR Best Books of 2013. This novel was long-listed for the IMPAC Dublin International Literary Award, nominated for a 2013 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and was chosen by Oprah Winfrey as the second selection for Oprah’s Book Club 2.0. Mathis teaches at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

March 3 Keynote talk: “The Twelve Tribes of Hattie,” with Ayana Mathis
6 – 8 p.m. Downtown Eugene Public Library, 100 W. 10th (10th & Olive), Eugene, OR  97401

Ayana Mathis will deliver a keynote talk, offer a Q&A session, and sign books.

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March 3 Panel with Ayana Mathis: 3:00 – 4:30 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA), Ford Lecture Hall, 1430 Johnson Lane, UO campus
(Light reception: 2:30 – 3 p.m.)

The Twelve Tribes of Hattie”—This panel will focus on the Great Migration and the work of women through the lens of  Ayana Mathis’s novel The Twelve Tribes of Hattie. The panel will feature Mathis reading portions of her novel, with comments by community educators and University of Oregon faculty.

Panelists include:

  • Marjorie Celona, UO Creative Writing Program, is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and the author of Y: A Novel (winner of France’s Grand Prix Littéraire de l’Héroïne for Best Foreign Novel).

    Sharon Luk, UO Department of English, teaches courses in African American Literature and Asian American Literature and studies in race and ethnicity.

    Mo Young, Equity and Access Coordinator, Lane County

    Moderator: Michelle McKinley, Director, CSWS; Bernard B. Kliks Associate Professor, School of Law

From the Lyceum Agency: “The Twelve Tribes of Hattie is the multi-generational story of one family, part of the Great Migration of African-Americans who left the South to escape hatred and oppression and seek opportunity in the North. An intimate portrait captured in twelve luminous narrative threads, The Twelve Tribes of Hattie opens in 1923, when fifteen-year-old Hattie Shepherd flees Georgia and settles in Philadelphia, hoping for a chance at a better life. Instead, she marries a man who will bring her nothing but disappointment and watches helplessly as her firstborn twins succumb to an illness a few pennies could have prevented. Hattie gives birth to nine more children whom she raises with grit and mettle and not an ounce of the tenderness they crave. That lack of love, as well as other travails, causes suffering to ripple through the generations.

“Isabel Wilkerson, writing in The New York Times, concludes that though the Great Migration forms the backdrop for the plot, The Twelve Tribes of Hattie is really the story of ‘a mother’s loss and the toll it takes on her and her children, their feeble attempts to escape their lives and the costs borne by every one of them.’”

Hosted by the Center for the Study of Women in Society at the University of Oregon in cooperation with Eugene Pubic Library, this symposium is generously cosponsored by Oregon Humanities Center’s Endowment for Public Outreach in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities; UO Libraries; Creative Writing Program; Departments of English and Ethnic Studies; the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art; and the Comparative Literature journal.

Former U.S. Geological Survey seismologist to speak at UO on 3/9/17

Lucy Jones examines human response to natural disasters

The Oregon Humanities Center presents a lecture by Lucy Jones, a public voice for earthquake science and earthquake safety. Jones will offer ideas about how we might better prepare for and respond to catastrophic natural occurrences in her lecture titled “The Fault Lies Not in Our Stars: Why Natural Disasters Become Human Catastrophes” on Thursday, March 9, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. in 156 Straub Hall on the UO campus.
 
Lucy Jones is the founder of the Dr. Lucy Jones Center for Science and Society, with a mission to foster the understanding and application of scientific information in the creation of more resilient communities. She is also a Research Associate at the Seismological Laboratory of Caltech, a post she has held since 1984. Working with both the public and private sectors, Jones seeks to increase communities’ ability to adapt and be resilient to the dynamic changes of the world around them. The aim is to understand and communicate where the greatest vulnerabilities lie and what actions can be taken to reduce the risk that are the most cost-effective. Jones recently completed 33 years of federal service with the U.S. Geological Survey.
Jones has been active in earthquake research for decades, furthering earthquake risk reduction through seismological research and integrated disaster scenarios. She developed the first major American earthquake drill, the Great ShakeOut.
 
The lecture is free and open to the public. For information, or for disability accommodations, contact ohc@uoregon.edu or (541) 346-3934.

Center for the Advancement of Sustainable Living “Talk and Tour”

The Center for the Advancement of Sustainable Living will be hosting a “Talk and Tour” this week, and invite everyone to come, listen and participate. 
 
The talk will take place at 5:15pm, Wednesday, March 1 in Lawrence rm. 286. The tour will be at his residence from 1 to 2pm on Saturday, March 4 (more specifics at the talk on March 1).  
 
Jan Spencer is a local community member, social and environmental activist and advocate for green culture and economy. He has been transforming his property into a permaculture landscape for over 15 years, demonstrating a solution to suburbia that thrives on home grown food.

Jan is very interested on convergence of economics, permaculture, human potential, urban land use, care for the environment and social uplift. He has traveled to over 30 countries on four continents and continues to contribute his efforts of living a sustainable lifestyle toward his local community in Eugene.

 
The title of his talk is: “Creating Green and Resilient Homes, Neighborhoods, Economy and Culture.”  We would love to see as many people there as possible. 
 
For more information about Jan and his Permaculture journey, see www.suburbanpermaculture.org

The University of Oregon Theatre Program presents: New Voices!

The University of Theatre Program presents: New Voices!

New Voices is comprised of two separate plays: “The Fruit Stand,” by Sravya Tadepalli and “On the Street Where We Used to Live,” by Cora Mills.

Both plays are the chosen winners of the “New Voices” playwriting competition and the winners are both University of Oregon students.

Show Information:

Price Range: 

$10 Adult | $8 Seniors 65+ | $8 UO Faculty/Staff | $8 Non-UO Students | Free for UO Students

Tickets: tickets.uoregon.edu
Location: 
Hope Theatre– Eugene (Miller Theatre Complex, University of Oregon)
Event Dates: 

Thursday, March 9, 2017 – 8:00pm

Friday, March 10, 2017 – 8:00pm

Saturday, March 11, 2017 – 8:00pm

Thursday, March 16, 2017 – 8:00pm

Friday, March 17, 2017 – 8:00pm

Saturday, March 18, 2017 – 8:00pm

Sunday, March 19, 2017 – 2:00pm

Both titles will be featured each night!

 

Q&A with the director Joseph Gilg:

  1. Why did you choose these plays?

These plays chose me; after many years organizing and overseeing the production of the New Voices plays the department asked if I would come back from my retirement to direct this year’s selections for that program. It is a pleasure for me as I love working on new plays and with young playwrights.

  1. In your estimation, what makes the play commercial?  To whom will this play most appeal?

The first play is a topical, “torn from the headlines” story called The Fruit Stand. It is a fictionalized conversation that takes place in the Governor’s Office in Columbia, South Carolina the day after the Charleston Church Shootings. The Governor, Nikki Haley, is getting advice from her Chief Aide and two state congressional leaders on what the official response to the shootings should be. The issue is topical and the event has recently been in the news again due to the trial and sentencing of Dylann Roof and the nomination and confirmation of Nikki Haley as the US Ambassador to the United Nations.

The second play is called On the Street Where We Used to Live and is a good, old-fashioned haunted house story on the surface. Underneath it explores issues of relationships and mental health and the nature of friendship. It is a compelling story that will keep the audience on the edge of their seats.

  1. Are there any special effects or theatrical elements that are compelling?

The setting for The Fruit Stand will be projected with significant sound and visual effects.

On the Street Where We Used to Live takes place in a raging mid-west thunderstorm with a tornado watch in effect.

  1. What do you think the public should know about this play?

There is not much about the plays that will need pre-knowledge. These are new plays- world premieres- written by students at the UO. In that sense it will be a novel experience for all involved.

  1. Are there any personal tie-ins or connections between this play and you or the cast that would make an interesting “human interest” story?

Because The Fruit Stand is so current and Nikki Haley very much in the news we feel a strong connection to the story and the characters.

UO Peace Corps Events Week 7 and 8

Upcoming Peace Corps events Week 7 and 8:

  1. Application Workshop: February 24, 2017. 12-1:30pm Career Center, Hendricks Hall room 220. Make your application stand out from the rest. Attend this hands on resume and interview workshop to learn how to browse Volunteer openings, find the right program, and strengthen your resume and behavioral interviewing skills. You will have an opportunity to ask questions about service, learn steps you can take to improve your chances, and gain valuable tips to guide you through the application process.
  1. In Celebration of Peace Corps Week 2017: Family Far and Wide. March 1, 2017. 5-7pm. EMU Spruce Room. This open event held on Peace Corp’s 56th birthday will highlight the hospitality of host counties from Nepal to Senegal through the eyes of Peace Corps Volunteers. Come between 5-7pm to enjoy snacks while engaging with local Returned Peace Corps Volunteers and watch a short film about hospitably around the world. For more information, contact Nicolette Ulrich at pcorps@uoregon.edu. Flyer below:

ELAN Creative Conversations Invite

Emerging Leaders in the Arts Network (ELAN) would like to extend an
invitation to the A&AA community to take part in our upcoming event-
Creative Conversations. This interactive and engaging event will bring
together individuals and groups who are working to cultivate arts and
culture programs, events, and collaborations in Eugene.
Facilitated by Colette Ramirez, Community Events Manager for the City of
Eugene Cultural Services Division, Creative Conversations will engage
participants in a series of rotating, roundtable discussions about
challenges and opportunities that individuals and organizations are
facing to cultivate arts and creative projects at the UO, Eugene and
beyond.
WHAT | Creative Conversations
WHEN | Wednesday, March 8th @ 5:30 PM
WHERE | Hop Valley Brewing Barrel Room, 990 W 1st Ave, Eugene, OR 97401
COST | FREE! Food will be provided / Cash bar available
This is a unique opportunity for students, faculty, community leaders,
campus organizations, community organizations, and student groups to
network and come together for a collaborative discussion around arts and
culture programming and leadership in Eugene. We encourage participants
to share programming ideas, challenges you might be facing, and what
you’re all about! Problem solve, workshop strategies, and connect with
others who are working to encourage innovative, relevant arts and
culture programming and participation at the UO and our surrounding
community!
Your presence is highly valued and integral to the success of this
collaborative event! We have reserved a private space at Hop Valley
Brewing and will be providing food for all attendees + a cash bar is
available. An RSVP is appreciated but not required.
If you have any questions, please contact Emerging Leaders in the Arts
Network at elan@uoregon.edu.

Conference Companion 2017

eramics Monthly and Pottery Making Illustrated presents The Portland, Oregon 2017 Conference Companion to serve our readers’ needs and interests while attending the NCECA conference. The Companion will be helpful in navigating the Portland area and getting the most out of the conference experience. Additionally, there will be articles, interviews, and tips and techniques to give readers a reason to keep and reference the publication again and again.

 

The Conference Companion will be available online to our 107,000 ceramicartsdaily.orgusers prior to the conferenceand print copies will be distributed at our booth at the NCECA conference.  The investment for a full page color ad in this publication would be $1,310; the investment for a quarter page color is $555.  Please see yellow highlights to download last year’s publication, rates are below as well.

 

The Conference Companion will be available online to our 107,000 ceramicartsdaily.org users prior to the conference, and print copies will be distributed at our booth at the NCECA conference.

– Mona

 

Space reservations end February 10  with
art due Monday, February 13.

Call me at 614-794-5834 or email me at mthiel@ceramics.org
to reserve your space.

 

What to Expect…

The Portland, Oregon 2017 Conference Companion will include a number of helpful maps and navigation tips for getting around Portland to see exhibitions and other clay-related highlights. Readers will also get floor plans for the conference hotels and convention center.

We will also have restaurant suggestions from local ceramic artists and arts administrators to make it easier to find great places to relax and grab a bite while you’re out visiting shows or taking a break from the lectures and demos.

HOPES[23] Meeting

Hopes23 Meeting Posters (2)-1cyrh8u

Just a reminder HOPES will be meeting tonight 2/15 in Lawrence 206 at 6:00 pm. As we are getting closer to the conference date, we will be announcing confirmed speakers, beginning to formulate panel topics, and discussing various workshops and events that will take place throughout the conference. If you are interested in getting involved in HOPES[23] or are just curious about what we are up to, please stop by or email me at mlittle7@uoregon.edu. Also, feel free to check our various social media pages @hopesconference or our website: hopes.uoregon.edu for meeting and conference updates.