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Posts under tag: Mars

May 12, 2015

Blue sunset over Mars as seen by the Curiosity rover

Martian Sunset as seen by the Curiosity Rover - May 2015
(Original article by NASA)
This was the first sunset observed in color by Curiosity.  The images come from the left-eye camera of the rover’s Mast Camera (Mastcam). The color has been calibrated and white-balanced to remove camera artifacts. Mastcam sees color very similarly to what human eyes see, although it is actually a little less sensitive to blue than people are.

Dust in the Martian atmosphere has fine particles that permit blue light to penetrate the atmosphere more efficiently than longer-wavelength colors.  That causes the blue colors in the mixed light coming from the sun to stay closer to sun’s part of the sky, compared to the wider scattering of yellow and red colors. The effect is most pronounced near sunset, when light from the sun passes through a longer path in the atmosphere than it does at mid-day.

Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, built and operates the rover’s Mastcam. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL designed and built the project’s Curiosity rover.

For more information about Curiosity, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl.

August 6, 2012

These Are the First Images from the Mars Curiosity Rover

Image of Mars from Land Rover landing August 5th 2012

The Mars Curiosity Rover has landed successfully! And here’s the first image, from the hazard cameras that will help it navigate through the surface of Mars. This is a phenomenal achievement. And here are the first images!

The image shows the shadow of the rover, securely positioned on the surface of the red planet. It seems like a boring image, but it’s extremely important. It means that everything is ok, that the rover is on firm ground and ready to start moving when Mission Control gives the order. It’s also the pinnacle of the landing, perhaps the most amazing achievement in planetary exploration after the Apollo missions.

More images will be coming in the coming days. The first horizon image should be coming any time now. The first high definition panorama, however, is a week away. Both should be amazing, showing a gigantic mountain: Aeolis Mons, commonly known as Mount Sharp,

Read more at Gizmodo.

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