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Google Books just won a decade-long copyright fight

Google Books wins case to continue to scan publications into its Books project.

The Supreme Court declined to listen to a case against Google for its Google Books project allowing them to continue to scan books into their databases.

According to the Washington Post, the Supreme Court declined to hear a challenge from authors who had argued that the Google Books project was “brazen violation of copyright law” which effectively ended the decade-long issue in Google’s favor.

Since the Supreme Court did not take up the case, the federal appeals court ruling from October, which found that the book-scanning program was considered fair use, will stand.

In 2011, there had been a settlement worked out between Google and The Authors Guild but it was later rejected by a district court judge. Subsequent hearings from the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals found that the efforts amounted to a “transformative” use of materials and that snippets from search findings did not amount to a “substantial substitute” for an original book.

Critics of the decisions made by the federal courts claim that this could weaken creators and their copyright by expanding fair use.

For more information, check out this article from the Washington Post.